Arkansas Army National Guard and the Global War on Terrorism

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The history of the Arkansas Army National Guard and the Global War on Terrorism begins with the expanded use of the National Guard for overseas duties as the United States reduced the size of the active army in an attempt to realize a "Peace Dividend" at the close of the "Cold War". Beginning in the 1990s Arkansas National Guard unit's experience increased Operations Temp and overseas training opportunities. In the late 1990s Arkansas National Guard units began deploying as part of peace keeping operations in the Balkans and in support of ongoing operations in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. Following the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, the National Guard became deeply involved in the Global War on Terrorism, with units deploying to guard infrastructure such as Arkansas Nuclear One and airports as part of Operation Noble Eagle. The Guard initially replaced regular army units on missions such as Middle East peace keeping in order to free these units for combat operations. With the 2003 Invasion of Iraq, the Arkansas National Guard began deploying for combat operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

Overseas training opportunities[edit]

Members of Battery B, 5th Battalion, 206th Field Artillery train with a Honduran Army artillery section in June 1990

39th Brigade units conducted numerous overseas training rotations throughout the 1980s and early 1990s.[1]

  • 1988, two batteries of the 5th Battalion, 206th Field Artillery conduct annual training in Honduras, Companies B and C, 2-153 IN conduct Annual Training in Great Britain as a part of Operation "Glo Worm/Rattlesnake", at Camp Crickhowell, Wales, hosted by members of the 5th Battalion, The Light Infantry.[1]
  • 1990, Company A, 1–153rd and Company C, 3rd Battalion, 153rd Infantry, along with the entire 5–206th Field Artillery conducted Annual Training in Honduras as part of the National Guard Bureau's Overseas Training Program. Company C, 1–153rd IN conducted Annual Training in the United Kingdom.
  • 1991, 1–153rd Infantry deployed with selected members of 2–153rd on a SOUTHCOM rotation to the Jungle Operations Training Center (JOTO) at Fort Sherman, Panama.[1]
  • 1992, Companies A, B and C, 2–153rd Infantry conduct Annual Training in Honduras in three separate rotations.[1]

Reorganization of 1996[edit]

The Arkansas National Guard was directed to reorganize, consolidate and restation units effective 30 September 1996 as follows:[2]

New Unit Former Unit Station
Det 1, HQ and HQ Company, 2nd Battalion, 153rd Infantry Battery A, 5th Battalion, (105mm)(Towed) 206th Artillery Wynne
Det 1, Company A, 2nd Battalion, 153rd Infantry Battery C, 5th Battalion, (105mm)(Towed) 206th Artillery Harrisburg
Company C (Minus Det 1), 2nd Battalion, 153rd Infantry Battery B, 5th Battalion, (105mm)(Towed) 206th Artillery Forrest City
Det 1, Company C, 2nd Battalion, 153rd Infantry Company C, 2nd Battalion, 153rd Infantry Brinkley
HQ and HQ Service Battery (Minus Det 1 (Fire Support)), 1st Battalion, 206th Field Artillery HQ and HQ Detachment, 217th Maintenance Battalion Russellville
Det 1, HQ and HQ Service Battery (Fire Support), 1st Battalion, 206th Field Artillery Det 1, HQ and HQ Service Battery (Fire Support), 5th Battalion, 206th Artillery North Little Rock
Battery A, 1st Battalion, 206th Field Artillery Battery A, 1st Battalion, 233rd Air Defense Artillery Morrilton
Battery B, 1st Battalion, 206th Field Artillery Battery B, 1st Battalion, 233rd Air Defense Artillery Paris
Battery C, 1st Battalion, 206th Field Artillery Battery C, 1st Battalion, 233rd Air Defense Artillery Dardanelle
Det 2, HQ and HQ Company, 39th Infantry Brigade HQ and HQ Service Battery, 5th Battalion, 206th Artillery (105mm)(Towed) West Memphis
Det 1, 239th Engineer Company HQ and HQ Battery, 1st Battalion, 233rd Air Defense Artillery Booneville
Det 1, Troop E, 151st Cavalry Det 1, Company C, 2nd Battalion, 153rd Infantry West Helena

SFOR 9[edit]

In March 2001, Company D, 1–153rd and Company D, 3–153rd deployed to Bosnia as part of the Multinational Stabilization Force (SFOR), Security Force Nine in order to assist with the enforcement of the mandate of the United Nations Mission in Bosnia and Herzegovina (UNMIBH).[3] The companies were attached to 3rd Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division for the deployment as part of Task Force Eagle. They performed presence patrols outside Forward Operating Base Morgan and Camp McGovern, and participated in the consolidation of weapon storage sites. The soldiers also guarded the sites.[4]

Operation Southern Watch[edit]

Company B, 2nd Battalion, 153 Infantry, and B Company, 3rd Battalion, 153rd Infantry of the 39th BCT were activated for Operation Southern Watch, May through September 1999.[4] B/2-153 deployed to Kuwait while Company B, 3-153 deployed to Prince Sultan Air Base, Saudi Arabia. 39th Brigade soldiers provided security at Patriot Missile Batteries during these deployments. The mission lasted a total of seven months, and was the first "pure" National Guard effort in the region. Company C, 1st Battalion, 153rd Infantry carried on the 39th's role in Operation Southern Watch when they replaced B/2-153 IN in September 1999.[3]

Global War on Terrorism[edit]

Conflict/OPN Unit Date activated #Activated
Operation Iraqi Freedom 296th Medical Company 10 February 2003 117
1123rd Transportation Company 11 February 2003 167
39th Infantry Brigade 12 October 2003 2,850
HHD, 2–114th Air Traffic Control 5 December 2003 54
Company C, 212th Signal Battalion 13 October 2004 138
Bravo Battery, 1–142nd FA 2 August 2005 152
25th Rear Area Operations Center 17 September 2005 49
77th Aviation Brigade (449th, 185th, 111th) 1 April 2006 258
2/142 Fires Brigade (HHC, A, B) 13 July 2006 323
875th Engineer BN 19 July 2006 387
Charlie Battery, 1–142nd FA 6 January 2007 152
213th Area Support 2 July 2007 78
HHC 871st Troop Command 9 June 2007 29
39th Infantry Brigade 2 January 2008 3,320
216th Military Police 2 January 2008 105
1123rd Transportation Company 2 January 2008 112
224th Maintenance Company 2 January 2008 137
1038 Engineer Company 2 January 2008 110
217th Support Battalion (Fires) 2 January 2008 486
Operation Noble Eagle 212th Signal Battalion 5 June 2003 262
Company A, 875th Engineer Battalion 15 March 2003 98
224th Maintenance Company 15 March 2003 215
HHSB, 1, 142nd FA 13 March 2004 122
25th Rear Area Operations Center 7 February 2003 49
OAF Company B, 935th Corps Support Battalion 30 January 2003 131
216th Military Police Company 4 October 2002 124
2nd Battalion, 142nd Field Artillery Brigade 3 September 2002 280
Operation Enduring Freedom 216th Military Police Company (duty at GTMO) 16 July 2003 95
Det 1, 70th MPAD (duty at GTMO) 8 August 2003 10
1036th Engineer Company (SAPPER) 7 November 2009 95
1037th Engineer Company (MOB AUG) 7 November 2009 95
Arkansas Agricultural Development Team 1 (AR-ADT1) 3 February 2010 64
KFOR 5B Company D, 114th ATS 12 October 2003 19
KFOR 7 Alpha Battery, 1–142nd FA 17 June 2005 140
KFOR13 (Kosovo) HHC 1 BN 114th Aviation 11 April 2010 57
DET 1, CO F, 2nd BN 238th Aviation 11 April 2010 20
SFOR 15 (Bosnia) Detachment 1, 149th Aviation Company 5 February 2004 15
MFO (Sinai) 2nd Battalion, 153rd Infantry 8 October 2001 628
SFOR 15 (Bosnia) Company D, 3rd Battalion, 153rd Infantry 3 February 2001 85
Company D, 1st Battalion, 153rd Infantry 3 February 2001 85
Operation Southern Watch (Saudi Arabia) Company B, 3rd Battalion, 153rd Infantry 28 May 1999 136
Operation Southern Watch (Kuwait) Company B, 2nd Battalion, 153rd Infantry 28 May 1999 136
Company C, 1st Battalion, 153rd Infantry 25 September 1999 136

Operation Jump Start[edit]

Main article: Operation Jump Start

In December 2006, the Arkansas National Guard deployed two 70 man companies for service on the southwest border in support of Operation Jump Start.[5][6] The operation was a joint operation between the Arkansas Army National Guard and the Arkansas Air National Guard. The primary army troop providers were the 39th Infantry Brigade Combat Team and the 35th Aviation Brigade. The 39th IBCT supplied to 70 man companies for service near Deming, New Mexico. The 35th Aviation Brigade supplies pilots and crews from the 1st Battalion, 114th Aviation to fly surveillance missions along the border area between Texas and Mexico.[6]

Organization of the Aviation Brigade[edit]

The Arkansas Army National Guard was authorized by National Guard Bureau in Memo NGB-ARF-T Organizational Authority Number 203-03 to create the Headquarters and Headquarters Company Aviation Brigade of the 35th Aviation Brigade in order to provide command and control to the state's aviation assets. Later, in 2006 the HHC Aviation Brigade, 35th Infantry Division was reorganized as the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 77th Theater Aviation Brigade by NGB Memo NGB-ARF-T Organizational Authority Number 26-06.

Reorganization of 2005–2006[edit]

In 2005 and 2006, as a part of the United States Army's transition to a new modular force, which focused on shifting from a division centric force to a brigade centric force, the Arkansas Army National Guard once again underwent a re-organization. This redesign of the army was intended to make the force more easily deployable by making brigades more self-contained and less dependent on support organizations at the division level. Major changes in each Major Subordinate Command included:

39th Brigade Combat Team:

142nd Field Artillery:

  • Activation of the 217th Support Battalion.
  • Activation of Battery F, (Target Acquisition)

87th Troop Command:

  • Deactivation of the 212th Signal Battalion.

Along with this reorganization came a significant re-stationing of several units within the state of Arkansas.

Significant state missions[edit]

The 39th BCT, 142nd Fires Brigade and the 87th Troop Command activated 50 man County Recovery Teams under state control in order to support Ice Storm Recovery Operations in northern Arkansas,[7] in Sharp County, Arkansas, between 30 January to 6 February 2009.

Operation Katrina[edit]

After Hurricane Katrina hit Louisiana in August 2005, elements of the Arkansas National Guard deployed to New Orleans by C-130s from the Little Rock Air Force Base to support the relief and recovery efforts as part of Operation Katrina.[8] Under tactical control of the Louisiana National Guard, Arkansas soldiers were given the mission of providing security and food and water to an estimated 20,000 people at the New Orleans Convention Center on 2 September.[9] By the afternoon of 3 September, all individuals staying in and around the Convention Center had been evacuated. The mission of the Arkansas Soldiers in Louisiana grew to the point that at one time the State Task Force was responsible for working with local officials in 14 parishes. Elements of the Arkansas National Guard stayed deployed in Louisiana until February 2006.

Arkansas National Guard Fallen Soldiers[edit]

This list is intended to include those Arkansas National Guardsmen who died while on duty in support of combat operations during the Global War on Terrorism. This list may be shorter than the lists included in various unit histories because those lists include soldiers who were not Arkansas National Guardsmen prior to mobilization, but may have been attached or assigned later. Arkansas' 39th Infantry Brigade Combat Team suffered a total of 33 casualties during its 2004–2005 deployment, however only 15 of these soldiers were Arkansas National Guardsmen.

Operation Iraqi Freedom 2004[edit]

  • Captain Arthur L. Felder of Lewisville, Age 36. Killed in Action, 24 April 2004
  • Chief Warrant Officer Patrick W. Kordsmeier of North Little Rock, Age 49. Killed in Action, 24 April 2004
  • Staff Sergeant Billy J. Orton of Carlisle, Age 41. Killed in Action, 24 April 2004
  • Staff Sergeant Stacey C. Brandon of Hazen, Age 35. Killed in Action, 24 April 2004
  • Specialist Kenneth Melton of Batesville, Age 30. Killed in Action, 25 April 2004
  • Staff Sergeant Hesley Box of Nashville, Age 24. Killed in Action, 6 May 2004
  • Sergeant First Class Troy Leon Miranda of Wickes, Age 44. Killed in Action, 20 May 2004
  • Sergeant Russell L. Collier of Harrison, Age 48. Killed in Action, 3 October 2004
  • Sergeant Ronald Wayne Baker of Cabot, Age 34. Killed in Action, 13 October 2004
  • Sergeant Michael A. Smith of Camden, Age 24. Died of Wounds, 26 November 2004

Operation Iraqi Freedom 2005[edit]

  • Specialist Jimmy D. Buie of Floral, Age 44. Killed in Action, 4 January 2005
  • Specialist Joshua S. Marcum of Evening Shade, Age 33. Killed in Action, 4 January 2005
  • Specialist Jeremy W. McHalffey of Mabelvale, Age 28. Killed in Action, 4 January 2005
  • Staff Sergeant William T. Robbins of Beebe, AR, HHC, 39th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Died at Camp Taji, Iraq, on 10 February 2005, of non-combat related injuries.

Operation Iraqi Freedom 2006[edit]

  • Specialist Derek James Plowman of Everton, AR, Battery C, 1st Battalion, 142nd Fires Brigade.

Died of non-combat related injuries on 20 July 2006 in Baghdad, Iraq.

Operation Iraqi Freedom 2007[edit]

  • Sergeant First Class John G. Brown, 43, of Little Rock, Ark., 1st Battalion, 185th Aviation Regiment (Air Assault), 77th Aviation Brigade, Camp Robinson, Ark.[10]
  • Major Michael V. Taylor, 40, of North Little Rock, Ark., 1st Battalion, 185th Aviation Regiment (Air Assault), 77th Aviation Brigade, Camp Robinson, Ark.
  • First Sergeant William T. Warren, 48, of North Little Rock, Ark., 1st Battalion, 185th Aviation Regiment (Air Assault), 77th Aviation Brigade, Camp Robinson, Ark.
  • Sergeant John R. Massey, 29, of Searcy, Ark., C Battery, 142 Fires Brigade, Ozark Ark.
  • Sergeant Erich Scott Smallwood, 23, of Truman, Ark., 1st Platoon, Company A, 875th Engineer Battalion, Jonesboro, Ark.

Operation Iraqi Freedom 2008[edit]

  • Sergeant First Class Anthony Lynn Woodham, Age 37, of Rogers, Ark., Heber Springs, Ark., died 5 July, at Camp Adder, Tallil, Iraq, from non-combat related injuries.
  • Specialist James M. Clay, Age 25, of Mountain Home, Ark.; Little Rock, Ark.; died 13 November 2008 in Anbar province, Iraq, of injuries sustained in a vehicle accident.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 1967–2002, 39th Infantry Brigade (Separate), The Arkansas Brigade, 35 Years of Excellence, A Brief History of the 39th Infantry Brigade (Separate)
  2. ^ National Guard Memorandum, NGB-ARF-IC (310-49C), Organization Authority Number 15-97
  3. ^ a b 1967–2002, 39th Infantry Brigade (Separate), The Arkansas Brigade, 35 Years of Excellence, Memorandum from BG Ronald S. Chastain
  4. ^ a b Global Security. Org, 3–153rd Infantry Battalion, Retrieved 22 January 2010,
  5. ^ Moore, Keith. "Arkansas Soldiers Keep Watch on New Mexico Desert". National Guard Bureau. Retrieved 31 December 2009. 
  6. ^ a b Heathscott, Chris. "Guard Leaders Get First Hand Look at Operation Jump Start". Arkansas National Guard Public Affairs Office. Retrieved 31 December 2009. 
  7. ^ Heathscott, Chris. "750 Guardsmen now supporting civil authorities in North Arkansas ~ Guard tasked with 71 missions in response to recent ice storm". Arkansas National Guard Public Affairs Office. Retrieved 31 December 2009. 
  8. ^ New Orleans: post-Katrina violence was exaggerated, Bill Wineburg, Retrieved 14 January 2010. http://ww4report.com/node/1131
  9. ^ Rainbows and Believers. Retrieved 15 January 2010.[dead link]
  10. ^ Stone, David, Joint Burial – 12 Crew & Passengers "Easy 40" ANC(Blackhawk crash 7 Jan to be buried at ANC), 6 October 2007|
  11. ^ Arkansas Online, Fallen Soldiers, accessed 9 September 2010, http://m.arkansasonline.com/warcasualties/

External links[edit]