Arlington Reservoir (Arlington, Massachusetts)

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Arlington Reservoir
Arlington Reservoir, ArlingtonMA - IMG 2695.JPG
Arlington Reservoir (Arlington, Massachusetts) is located in Massachusetts
Arlington Reservoir (Arlington, Massachusetts)
Location Arlington, Massachusetts
Coordinates 42°24′52″N 71°11′34″W / 42.41444°N 71.19278°W / 42.41444; -71.19278Coordinates: 42°24′52″N 71°11′34″W / 42.41444°N 71.19278°W / 42.41444; -71.19278
Built 1920s
Architect Frederick F. Low
Architectural style Classical Revival
MPS Arlington MRA
NRHP Reference #

85002676

[1]
Added to NRHP September 27, 1985

The Arlington Reservoir is a large water storage tank located on Park Circle in Arlington, Massachusetts. It was constructed by the Metropolitan Water Works (now MWRA) between 1921 and 1924 in the Classical Revival style, to provide water storage for Northern Extra-High Service area, consisting of Lexington and the higher elevations of Belmont and Arlington.[2] It is an exact copy of the rotunda from the Samothrace temple complex in Greece.

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.

History[edit]

In 1895, the Town of Arlington constructed a 550,000 gallon standpipe at this location.[3] However, after Arlington joined the Metropolitan Water District in 1899, the tank soon proved to be inadequate to supply other nearby towns, and was only used to regulate water pressure in the area.[4] The current 2,000,000 gallon tank,[5] contained within a stone rotunda, was built between 1921 and 1924 by Crane Construction Company, with William E. Foss as chief engineer.

In the Community[edit]

On September 7, 2014, Luminarium Dance Company created a community arts event celebrating 90 years since the Arlington Reservoir's completion. Roughly 300 locals attended the event entitled "Night at the Tower," showcasing a live dance performance on the lawn combined with colossal video projections on the tower. This was the first event of its kind to be held at the Arlington Reservoir,[6] and included 75 Arlington-inspired images created by local youth and adults over the past decade by the Arlington Center for the Arts. "Night at the Tower" was created and led by Luminarium Artistic Director and Arlington local Merli V. Guerra and was supported in part by a grant from the Arlington Cultural Council, a local agency, which is supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency.[7]

References[edit]

See also[edit]