Armed merchant ship

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The term armed merchant ship may describe a number of similar ship modifications intended for significantly different missions. The term armed merchantman is generally used.

  • East Indiaman describes late 18th and early 19th-century sailing ships engaged in trade while carrying guns similar to contemporary warships.
  • Defensively Equipped Merchant Ships were civilian-manned cargo ships carrying a small number of military personnel to operate an anti-submarine gun and anti-aircraft machine guns during the world wars of the early 20th century.[1]
  • Auxiliary cruisers were cargo ships commissioned as naval vessels with a military crew, converted to carry the guns of a light cruiser, and sometimes used as Merchant raiders.[2]
  • Armed merchant cruisers were fast passenger liners commissioned as naval vessels with a military crew and converted to carry the guns of a light cruiser.[3]
  • Naval trawlers were fishing trawlers commissioned as naval vessels with a military crew and equipped for minesweeping or anti-submarine escort.[4]
  • Q-ships were small civilian ships commissioned as naval vessels with a military crew, but retaining their original appearance while carrying concealed anti-submarine weapons.[5]
  • Armed boarding steamers were merchant steamers converted by the United Kingdom for boarding enemy vessels.

Sources[edit]

  • Hague, Arnold (2000). The Allied Convoy System 1939-1945. Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-019-3. 
  • Lenton, H.T. and Colledge, J.J. (1968). British and Dominion Warships of World War II. Doubleday and Company. 
  • Morison, Samuel Eliot (1975). History of United States Naval Operations in World War II, Volume I The Battle of the Atlantic 1939-1943. Little, Brown and Company. 
  • Schmalenbach, Paul (1979). German Raiders. Naval Institute Press. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Hague 2000 pp.101-105
  2. ^ Schmalenbach 1979 pp.11-15
  3. ^ Lenton and Colledge 1968 p.265
  4. ^ Lenton and Colledge 1968 pp.403-404
  5. ^ Morison 1975 pp.281-286