Armourers and Brasiers' Company Prize

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The Armourers and Brasiers' Company Prize is sponsored by the Worshipful Company of Armourers and Brasiers and awarded biennially by the Royal Society "for excellence in materials science and technology" and is accompanied by a £2000 gift. [1] The medal was first awarded in 1985 to Michael F. Ashby "in recognition of his outstanding contributions to materials science, first for identifying the mechanism underlying and by modelling theoretically a number of phenomena of great importance to the materials engineer".

List of recipients[edit]

Year Name Rationale Notes
1986 Michael F. Ashby "in recognition of his outstanding contributions to materials science, first for identifying the mechanism underlying and by modelling theoretically a number of phenomena of great importance to the materials engineer, and second for pioneering the important concepts of deformation and fracture maps which display in a single field the area of dominance of specific flow and fracture mechanisms."
1988 Kenneth H. Jack "in recognition of his outstanding work on ceramics, in particular that on sialons and their subsequent applications"
1991 Wiiliam Bonfield "in recognition of his pioneering and innovative work in biomaterials, in particular in developing the concept of a hydroxyapatite reinforced polymer composite'"
1993 Jan Edgar Evetts "in recognition of his many significant contributions to the study and application of superconducting materials, amorphous magnetic alloys and multi-layered materials"
1993 James Derek Birchall "in recognition of his outstanding work on inorganic materials including the development of strong ceramic fibres and high strength macro-defect-free cement."
1995 Michael James Goulette "n recognition of his outstanding work in the field of gas turbine materials and the development of new super alloys and advanced composites such as titanium matrix composites and ceramic matrix composites"
1997 Harry Bhadeshia "in recognition of his outstanding work in the field of solid state phase transformation in steels, in particular for his research into the bainite transformations and for his invention of a carbide-free bainitic steel with enhanced wear and fracture resistance."
1999 David Pettifor "in recognition of his outstanding work in the development of phenomenological structure maps for binary and pseudo-binary alloys known as the 'Pettifor Maps', and his vision and leadership in establishing the Materials Modelling Laboratory at Oxford with its strong links to industry and recognised as an international flagship laboratory for modelling"
2001 John Hunt "in recognition of his outstanding and wide-ranging and definitive theoretical and experimental research on solidification of materials, and for his contributions to industrial casting processes."
2003 Derek Fray "in recognition of his outstanding contribution to work in the fields of extractive metallurgy and materials chemistry, in particular for his leading role in the development of the FCC process for the reduction of titanium and other metals from their oxides, and for his promotion of links with industry and other organisations interested in its exploitation"
2005 John Kilner "in recognition of his work in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs). His fundamental work has been focused on the control of oxygen transportation in ceramic materials, and most recently in applying this in his development of solid oxide fuel cells"
2007 Alan Windle "in recognition of his work in the areas of liquid crystalline polymers, computational modelling, and carbon nanotubes" -
2009 Anthony Kinloch "in recognition of his outstanding work in adhesion science and technology"
2010 Philip Withers "in recognition of his pioneering use of neutron and hard x-ray beams to map stresses and image defects in industrial scale components and devices." [2]
2012 Jenny Nelson "for her theoretical insight into the many factors affecting the fabrication and performance of organic photovoltaics, which has led to the rational design of these devices and related photodetectors based on organic semiconductors." -

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Armourers & Brasiers’ Company Prize (1984)". Royal Society. Archived from the original on 30 August 2010. Retrieved 2010-08-15. 
  2. ^ "Royal Society award for research on material stresses". Science and Technologies Facilities Council. Retrieved 15 August 2010.