Armstrong Circle Theatre

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Armstrong Circle Theatre
Genre Anthology drama
Presented by Nelson Case (1950–1951)
Joe Ripley
(1952–1953)
Bob Sherry
(1953–1954)
Sandy Becker (1954–1955)
John Cameron Swayze (1955–1957)
Douglas Edwards (1957–1961)
Ron Cochran (1961–1962)
Henry Hamilton (1962–1963)
Composer(s) Harold Levey
Will Schaefer
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 14
Production
Executive producer(s) David Susskind (1954–1960)
Producer(s) Selig Alkon
Jacqueline Babbin
Robert Costello
Hudson Faucett
George Lowther
Ralph Nelson
Henry Salomon
George Simpson
David Susskind
Running time 30 mins. (1950–1955)
60 mins. (1955–1963)
Broadcast
Original channel NBC
(June 1950–June 1957)
CBS
(October 1957–August 1963)
Picture format Black-and-white
Audio format Monaural
Original run June 6, 1950 (1950-06-06)  – August 28, 1963 (1963-08-28)

Armstrong Circle Theatre is an American anthology drama television series[1] which ran from 1950 to 1957 on NBC, and then until 1963 on CBS. It alternated weekly with The U.S. Steel Hour.

Synopsis[edit]

The series featured original dramas by noted writers, although sometimes comedies were shown. Its guidelines specifically called for the avoidance of violence. Originally a half-hour production, in 1955 the show expanded to an hour and began to emphasize dramatized versions of real-life contemporary events (including the sinking of the SS Andrea Doria and a documentary on the history of Communism in the Soviet Union. Upon moving to CBS, the show emphasized several Cold War topics, including espionage, Radio Free Europe and escapes from East Germany.[2]

Rod Serling wrote two episodes of the program. George Lowther was the producer for 62 episodes and wrote one.

Hosts and narrators[edit]

Guest stars[edit]

The series featured numerous guest stars including:

References[edit]

  1. ^ J.C. Maçek III (2012-08-02). "'American Pop'... Matters: Ron Thompson, the Illustrated Man Unsung". PopMatters. 
  2. ^ Gibberman, Susan. "Armstrong Circle Theatre". museum.tv. Retrieved 2009-04-10. 

External links[edit]