Arnolt Bronnen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Arnolt Bronnen
Born (1895-08-19)19 August 1895
Vienna
Died 12 October 1959(1959-10-12) (aged 64)
East Berlin
Occupation Playwright
Theatre director
Nationality Austrian
Literary movement Expressionism
Notable work(s) Parricide (1922)

Arnolt Bronnen (19 August 1895 - 12 October 1959) was an Austrian playwright and director.

Life and career[edit]

Bronnen was born in Vienna, Austria. His father was Jewish and his mother was Christian.[1] Bronnen's most famous play is the Expressionist drama Parricide (Vatermord, 1922); its première production is notable, among other things, for being that from which Bronnen's friend, the young Bertolt Brecht in an early stage of his directing career, withdrew, after being taken to hospital with malnutrition and the actors of the cast, led by Heinrich George, walked out on him.[2] According to The Cambridge Guide to Theatre, the "erotic, anti-bourgeois, black expressionism" of the play "caused a sensation" when it was eventually performed.

Bronnen also wrote Birth of Youth (Geburt der Jugend, 1922) and Die Excesse (1923).[3] After having collaborated on film treatments and various theatrical projects together, in 1923 Bronnen and Brecht co-directed a condensed version of Pastor Ephraim Magnus (a nihilistic, Expressionist play, according to The Cambridge Guide, "stuffed with perversities and sado-masochistic motifs") by Hans Henny Jahnn.[4] Later in his life he wrote reportage plays.[3]

Bronnen signed the Gelöbnis treuester Gefolgschaft, a "vow of most faithful allegiance" to Adolf Hitler in 1933;[5] after the Second World War he became a communist.[3]

Bronnen died in East Berlin and is buried in the Dorotheenstadt cemetery.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Menorah Journal 19 (1930) 170.
  2. ^ Willett and Manheim (1970, viii) and Thomson (1994, 26).
  3. ^ a b c Banham (1998, 132).
  4. ^ Banham (1998, 553), Sacks (1994, xviii), and Willett and Manheim (1970, viii).
  5. ^ 88 "writers", from Letters of Heinrich and Thomas Mann, 1900-1949, Weimar and Now: German Cultural Criticism 12, University of California Press 1998, ISBN 0-520-07278-2, pp. 367–68.
  6. ^ Taylor (1980, 65).

Sources[edit]

  • Banham, Martin, ed. 1998. The Cambridge Guide to Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge UP. ISBN 0-521-43437-8.
  • Sacks, Glendyr. 1994. "A Brecht Calendar." In The Cambridge Companion to Brecht. Ed. Peter Thomson and Glendyr Sacks. Cambridge Companions to Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-41446-6. pp. xvii–xxvii.
  • Taylor, Ronald. 1980. Literature and Society in Germany, 1918–1945. Harvester studies in contemporary literature and culture 3. Brighton, Sussex: Harvester Press / Totowa, New Jersey: Barnes & Noble. ISBN 9780389200369.
  • Thomson, Peter. 1994. "Brecht's Lives." In The Cambridge Companion to Brecht. Ed. Peter Thomson and Glendyr Sacks. Cambridge Companions to Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-41446-6. p. 22–39.
  • Willett, John and Ralph Manheim. 1970. "Introduction." In Collected Plays: One by Bertolt Brecht. Ed. John Willett and Ralph Manheim. Bertolt Brecht: Plays, Poetry and Prose Ser. London: Methuen. ISBN 0-416-03280-X. pp. vii–xvii.