Array Networks

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Array Networks
Type Private
Industry Security and Application Delivery
Founded 2000
Headquarters Milpitas, California
Products SPX Series SSL VPN, APV Application Delivery Controllers
Website Official website

Founded in 2000, and headquartered in Silicon Valley, California, Array Networks is a global technology company that addresses problems related to securely delivering enterprise applications to end users.

Array takes a hardware-based approach to deliver enterprise applications, including SPX series SSL VPN enterprise platforms,[1][2] APV Series Application Delivery Controller Enterprise Platforms,[3] and Net Cert PKI Certificate Management Solutions.

SPX series SSL VPN enterprise platforms[edit]

Array's SPX series products are enterprise class SSL VPNs that cover the full range of SSL based remote access from Network Level access (called Layer 3 VPN) to Web based access. The SPX series Universal Access Controllers address internal access,[4] WiFi access, desktop access, site-to-site access, partner access and customer access.[5]

WiFi Access[edit]

For example, hardware platforms can be configured with software called WiFiProtect for secure wireless LAN access and segmented WiFi access across hotspots. WiFiProtect runs on Array's SPX Universal Access Controller hardware and incorporates technologies that support Wi-Fi.

For example, software directs machines coming onto the network via wireless access points to a portal where they present credentials. Guest users are required to go through a virtual LAN that provides limited access. Identity-based wireless access is used for “guest sponsorship” for partners, guests and employees. Enterprise users access the network through any standard browser.[6]

Site-to-site SSL VPN connectivity (“SiteDirect”) eliminates network exposure and limits access to specific applications or subnets.[7]

Remote Desktop Access[edit]

For remote desktop access and control, DesktopDirect allows users to remote desktops from a standard web browser.[8] DesktopDirect can remotely boot up PCs that are in the “off” or “standby” states.

To access a remote desktop, self-registration starts with a user in the office, sitting at the PC that will be controlled remotely. The user browses to a specific URL to access the registration portal. The user logs in upon seeing a prompt for credentials, enters the hostname and description of the desktop PC, and registration is complete.

Remote control of the office PC starts with the user sitting away from the office, at a remote PC. The user browses to a specific URL, known as an access portal, and again logs in upon a prompt for credentials. A list of registered office PCs is then displayed, so the user can select which office PC to view and control. The user then logs into and controls the office PC.

This is possible from any browser and Internet-attached computer. DesktopDirect only delivers the presentation layer remotely. This minimizes bandwidth consumption and increases support for concurrent users.[9]

Application Delivery Controllers and Server Load Balancers[edit]

The Array Networks (AppVelocity) APV Series consists of Application Delivery Controllers for SSL acceleration, load balancing and traffic management at layers 2- 7 for enterprise data centers and Web sites. The APV Series is available on a variety of platform sizes, uses 60% less power and cuts response time by 50%.[3]

In 2009, Array launched an upgraded application delivery controller for enterprises and service providers using Web 2.0 applications, multimedia services and hosted cloud-centric applications.[10]

References[edit]

External links[edit]