Arrington Dixon

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Arrington Dixon
Born Arrington Dixon
United States
Occupation Politician
Political party
Democratic
Spouse(s) Sharon Pratt Kelly (1967–82)
(divorced)
Children 2

Arrington Dixon is an African American former city council member and chairman of Washington, D.C. In 2008, he was D.C.'s male representative on the Democratic National Committee[1] and a thus a superdelegate to the Democratic National Convention. He ran for reelection as national committeeman in the September 2008 Democratic primary but was defeated by Vincent Orange, 56 to 44 percent.[2]

He was also appointed by Mayor Barry to serve as a public member of the National Capital Planning Commission. He was married to former D.C. mayor Sharon Pratt Kelly before she served as mayor (1991–1995).

Council of the District of Columbia[edit]

In November 1974, Dixon was chosen to represent Ward 4 when voters elected the first members of the Council of the District of Columbia, the legislature of the city's new home rule government.[3] The initial term for the Ward 4 seat, like those for half the council seats, was only 2 years, to provide for staggered council elections in later years,[4] but in 1976 Dixon was reelected to a full 4-year term.[3]

In 1978, council chairman Sterling Tucker ran for mayor rather than seeking reelection.[5] Dixon, who was halfway through his Ward 4 term, decided to run for council chairman and won. He served 4 years. In 1982 he ran for reelection but was defeated in the Democratic primary by David A. Clarke.[5]

More than a decade later, Dixon returned to the council as an at-large member for a few months in 1997 when he was chosen in August by the District of Columbia Democratic State Committee to replace Linda Cropp, who had vacated her at-large seat to become chairman.[6] The appointment lasted only until a December special election, in which he was defeated by then-Republican David Catania.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ District of Columbia Democratic State Committee. "About Us". Retrieved 2008-08-10. 
  2. ^ District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics (2008-09-10). "Primary Election, 2008, Election Night Unofficial Results". Archived from the original on 11 September 2008. Retrieved 2008-09-12. 
  3. ^ a b District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. "Historical Elected Officials: Ward 4 Member of the Council of the District of Columbia". Archived from the original on 2008-07-16. Retrieved 2008-07-20. 
  4. ^ District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. "Historical Elected Officials: Length of Initial Terms Following First Home Rule Election". Archived from the original on 2008-07-16. Retrieved 2008-07-21. 
  5. ^ a b District of Columbia Board of Elections and Ethics. "Historical Elected Officials: Chairman of the Council of the District of Columbia". Archived from the original on 2008-07-16. Retrieved 2008-07-20. 
  6. ^ "Arrington Dixon to Fill Vacancy Left by Cropp on D.C. Council". The Washington Post. 1997-08-16. p. D06. Retrieved 2008-07-22. 
  7. ^ Williams, Vanessa (1997-12-03). "Republican Wins Seat on D.C. Council; Catania Upsets Dixon Amid Low Turnout". The Washington Post. p. C01. Retrieved 2008-07-22. 

External links[edit]

Council of the District of Columbia
First Ward 4 Member, Council of the District of Columbia
1975 – 1979
Succeeded by
Charlene Drew Jarvis
Preceded by
Sterling Tucker
Chairman of the Council of the District of Columbia
1979 – 1983
Succeeded by
David A. Clarke
Preceded by
Linda W. Cropp
At-Large Member, Council of the District of Columbia
1997
Succeeded by
David Catania