Ars Nova (American band)

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Ars Nova
Origin New York, USA
Genres progressive rock, classical rock Psychedelic Rock
Labels Elektra
Atlantic
Past members Wyatt Day
Jon Pierson
Maury Baker
Giovanni Papalia
Bill Folwell
Jonathan Raskin
Sam Brown
Jimmy Owens
Art Koenig
Warren Bernhardt
Joe Hunt

Ars Nova was an American progressive rock band that performed and recorded from 1967 to 1969.[1] The original core of the group comprised two former students from Mannes College in New York City - Wyatt Day (guitar, keyboards, vocals), who wrote or co-wrote most of the band's songs, and Jon Pierson (trombone, vocals).[2]

They recorded two albums. The first was a 1968 self-titled album for the Elektra label, on which the personnel comprised Day, Pierson, Maury Baker (organ, percussion), Giovanni Papalia (lead guitar), Bill Folwell (trumpet, bass, vocals), and Jonathan Raskin (bass, guitar, vocals). The band was signed to Elektra by Paul Rothchild, who produced their self-titled album in Los Angeles, with additional songwriting by Greg Copeland and released in April 1968.[3] However, the band split up after a disastrous performance supporting The Doors at the Fillmore East in mid-1968, about the same time as they were hyped with a profile in Life magazine.[1][2][4]

Day and Pierson then formed a new version of the band, with guitarist Sam Brown, trumpeter Jimmy Owens, bassist Art Koenig, keyboardist Warren Bernhardt and drummer Joe Hunt. They recorded a second album, Sunshine & Shadows, which was released on Atlantic in 1969.[5]

Discography[edit]

ALBUMS

  • Ars Nova (April 1968)
  • Sunshine and Shadows (June 1969)

SINGLES

  • "Pavane for My Lady" / "Zarathustra" (April 1968)
  • "Fields of People" / "March of the Mad Duke's Circus" (September 1968)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Allmusic: Ars Nova
  2. ^ a b Mick Houghton, Liner notes for Forever Changing: The Golden Age of Elektra Records 1963-1973, p.35
  3. ^ Roxon, Lilian: Lilian Roxon's Rock Encyclopedia (Grossett and Dunlap, Universal Library Edition, 1971) ISBN 0-448-00255-8
  4. ^ "The Ups and Downs Along the Rocky Road of Rock". Life. June 28, 1968. Retrieved January 19, 2013. 
  5. ^ Technicolor Web of Sound: Ars Nova