Art director

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Art director is the title for a variety of similar job functions in theater, advertising, marketing, publishing, fashion, film and television, the Internet, and video games.[1]

General role and job description[edit]

Various artists may create or develop specific parts of an art piece or scene; but it is the charge of a sole art director to supervise and unify the vision. In particular, the art director is in charge of the overall visual appearance and how it communicates visually, stimulates moods, contrasts features, and psychologically appeals to a target audience. The art director makes decisions about visual elements used, what artistic style to use, and when to use motion.

One of the most difficult problems that art directors face is to translate desired moods, messages, concepts, and underdeveloped ideas into imagery. During the brainstorming process, art directors, co-workers, and clients are engaged in imagining what the finished piece or scene might look like. At times, an art director is ultimately responsible for solidifying the vision of the collective imagination while resolving conflicting agenda and inconsistencies between the various individual inputs.

Interfacing between information technologies and marketing activities[edit]

A coordination among the different professionals in the mentioned areas is wanted, under the supervision of an experienced leader who will decide the last characteristics of the final promotional products in the services companies. The art director activities and responsibility will avoid the possible loops in the development of the products, with some wasting of time and productivity, throughout the statement of some guidelines defining the most suitable features of that products.

In advertising[edit]

Despite the title, an advertising art director is not necessarily the head of an art department. In modern advertising practice, an art director typically works in tandem with a copywriter. The team usually works together to devise an overall concept (also known as the "creative" or "big idea") for the commercial, mailer, brochure, or other advertisement. The copywriter is responsible for the textual content, the art director for the visual aspects. But the art director may come up with the headline or other copy, and the copywriter may suggest a visual or the aesthetic approach. Each person usually welcomes suggestions and constructive criticism from the other. Ideally, the words and visual should not parrot each other; each should enhance or enlarge the other's meaning and effect.

Although a good art director is expected to have graphic design judgment and technical knowledge of production, it may not be necessary for an art director to hand-render comprehensive layouts (or even be able to draw), now that virtually all but the most preliminary work is done on computer.

Except in the smallest organizations, the art director/copywriter team is overseen by a creative director, senior media creative, chief creative director. In a large organization, an art director may oversee other art directors and a team of junior designers, image developers and/or production artists, and coordinates with a separate production department. In a smaller organization, the art director may fill all these roles, including oversight of printing and other production.

In film[edit]

An Art Director, in the hierarchical structure of a film art department, works directly below the production designer, in collaboration with the Set Decorator, and above the set designers. A large part of their duties include the administrative aspects of the art department. They are responsible for assigning tasks to personnel such as the Art Department Coordinator, and the Construction Coordinator, keeping track of the art department budget and scheduling (i.e. Prep/Wrap Schedule) as well as overall quality control. They are often also a liaison to other departments; especially Construction, Special FX, Property, Transportation (graphics), and Locations Departments. The Art Director also attends all production meetings and tech scouts in order to provide information to the set designers in preparation for all departments to have a visual floor plan of each location visited.

In the past, the title of Art Director was used to denote the head of the art department (hence the Academy Award for Best Art Direction ) which also included the Set Decorator. Now the Award includes the Production Designer and Set Decorator. On the movie Gone with the Wind, David O. Selznick felt that William Cameron Menzies had such a significant role in the look of the film, that the title Art Director was not sufficient and so he gave Menzies the title of Production Designer.[2] The title has become more common, and now Production Designer is commonly used as the title for the head of the Art Department, although the title actually implies control over every visual aspect of a film, including costumes.

In publishing[edit]

Art directors in publishing typically work with the publication's editors. Together, they work on a concept for sections and pages of a publication. Individually, the art director is mostly responsible for the visual look and feel of the publication, and the editor has ultimate responsibility for the publication's verbal and textual content.

In Japanese animation[edit]

In Japanese animation productions, the role of art director (美術監督, bijutsu kantoku) refers specifically to the background artist in charge of producing background art for the animation, either personally or by directing a team of artists.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://catandbee.onsugar.com/33-things-I-know-about-Art-Direction-19040343
  2. ^ Preston, Ward (1994). What an Art Director Does. Silman-James Press. p. 150. ISBN 1-879505-18-5. 

External links[edit]

  • ADG Art Direction Wiki Online community and knowledgebase relating to new and classic technologies relevant to the art of film design