Art doll

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For the articulated doll used by artists, see mannequin.
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Art dolls are objects of art, rather than children's toys, created in a wide variety of styles and media, and may include both pre-manufactured parts or wholly original works.

Creation[edit]

Art dolls production demand a wide range of skills and technologies, including sculpting, painting, and costuming.

Materials[edit]

A variety of media may be employed in the creation of an art doll, including fabric, paperclay, polymer clay, wax, wood, porcelain, natural or synthetic hair, yarn, wool, and felt.

Demand[edit]

One of a kind (OOAK) art dolls may command prices in the thousands of dollars; publications featuring established and emerging doll artists support collection, and artist groups, such as the National Institute of American Doll Artists, promote the art form. Art Doll Quarterly by Stampington & Company is one example of a print publication exclusively dedicated to engaging doll artists and collectors.

Work in high demand- such as the elaborate ball-jointed ceramic dolls of Marina Bychkova -fetch prices from $5,000 to $45,000, and are collected by the likes of Louis Vuitton designers.[1]

Events[edit]

2008's Melbourne Fringe Festival featured the work of Rachel Hughes and curator Sayraphim Lothian, amongst others.[2]

Controversy[edit]

In 2010, Facebook banned images of an art doll posted by Sydney jeweller Victoria Buckley; included were images of a semi-naked doll used to display jewellery in her shop window.[3] The doll was the work of Bychkova's.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sydney Morning Herald article "Now Facebook bans doll nipples", by Asher Moses, July 5, 2010 [1]
  2. ^ The Age newspaper article "Oh, you inscrutable doll," by Frances Atkinson 2008 [2]
  3. ^ Sydney Morning Herald article "Now Facebook bans doll nipples", by Asher Moses, July 5, 2010 [3]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]