Arthur (newspaper)

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Arthur
Type Student Newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Owner(s) Trent University Student Body
Editor Sara Ostrowska
Pat Reddick
Founded 1966
Headquarters

751 George St. N Peterborough, ON

Canada Canada
Circulation 3,000
Official website http://trentarthur.ca/

Arthur is a student newspaper of Trent University, based in Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. It has a circulation of 3000. Arthur is funded through a non-refundable levy from every full-time student at the university. Articles for Arthur are produced by a staff collective of paid staff and volunteer writers who meet weekly to plan the next issue in Sadleir House, the historic building which houses its office. The collective elects one or more chief editors who serve a term of one academic year in an administrative and editorial role. On March 26, 2013, Sara Ostrowska and Patrick Reddick were elected as co-editor-in-chiefs of Volume 48 (2013-2014).

Subject material[edit]

Arthur deals mainly with news related to the Trent and Peterborough communities, but also features arts, sports, national and world news and regular columnists.

Historically, Arthur has had a left-leaning political stance. In the past articles have focused on issues such corporate boycottism, socialism, LGBT rights, Canadian Aboriginal rights, feminism, corporate presence on campus, and accountability in university administration.

Origin of the name[edit]

The first editor in chief was Stephen Stohn, who gave the newspaper the unusual name Arthur. Many believed that he came up with the name because of the legend of King Arthur, since the Trent University crest appears to depict Excalibur rising out of the water, as in the King Arthur legend. The sword depicted is meant to be Samuel de Champlain's. The name arose from Stohn's love for the Beatles: in the Beatles' film A Hard Day's Night, George Harrison is asked what his hairstyle is called and simply replies "Arthur". Likewise when a friend asked what the student paper would be called, Stohn quipped "Arthur" and the name has carried on to this day.[citation needed]

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