Arthur F Hebard

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Arthur F. Hebard
Born March 2, 1940
New York City, New York, U.S.A.
Fields Physics
Institutions University of Florida
Alma mater Stanford University

Arthur F. Hebard (born 2 March 1940) is Distinguished Professor of Physics at University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida. He is particularly noted for leading the discovery of superconductivity in Buckminsterfullerene in 1991.[1][2]

Art Hebard attended The Hotchkiss School and graduated with a BA in Physics from Yale University in 1962. He obtained his PhD from Stanford University in 1971. After a spell as a Research Associate at Stanford, he became a member of the Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Telephone Laboratories. He moved to the University of Florida as a Professor in 1996, and in 2007 was given the title of Distinguished Professor.

He is the author of more than 250 refereed scientific publications and 90 invited presentations, and has been issued with 10 patents. He was awarded the 2008 James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials by the American Physical Society.[3]

His research interests include thin-film physics, graphene, fullerenes and fullerene derived compounds, superconductivity, dilute magnetic semiconductors, magnetism in thin films and at thin film interfaces, interface capacitance, magnetocapacitance of complex oxides and semiconductors .[4] Notable recent work has been on the use of graphene for solar cells.[5]

He was married to the late Caroline Hebard and has four children and seven grandchildren.

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