Arthur Getagazhev

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Arthur Getagazhev
Native name Артур Гатагажев
Nickname(s) Emir Abdullah (Ubaydullakh)
Born (1975-11-09)November 9, 1975
Mary, Turkmen SSR
Died May 24, 2014(2014-05-24)
Sagopshi, Ingushetia[1]
Allegiance Caucasus Emirate
Commands held Vilayat Galgaycho
Battles/wars North Caucasus Insurgency

Arthur Getagazhev (Russian: Артур Гатагажев), also known as Emir Abdullah or Ubaydullakh,[2] was an Islamist militant leader in the Russian North Caucasus republic of Ingushetia.

Active in the Insurgency in Ingushetia from at least 2009[3] , Getagazhev was credited for many attacks in Ingushetia including the assassination of the Ingushetia head of security Akhmet Kotiev.

Following the killing of Dzhamaleyl Mutaliyev (alias Emir Adam) by Russian security forces on 21 May 2013, Doku Umarov, leader of the Caucasus Emirate, appointed Getagazhev as the head of the Vilayat Galgaycho rebels.[3][4] Getagazhev was among 7 killed during a raid by security forces on the village of Sagopshi on 24 May 2014.[1]

Aftermath[edit]

On 6 July 2014 Russian special forces prepared an ambush near the morgue where the body of Arthur Getagazhev was located. The intelligence reported that Ingush rebels will try to recover the body of the slain leader. The intelligence was correct. Radio Free Europe (section specializing in the Caucasus), reports that in the middle of the day 2 Ingush rebels attacked the ambush, killed 7 and wounded 4 Russian FSB and spetsnaz officers for less than 40 seconds. After which the rebels left the scene unharmed.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Bokov: "Emir of Ingushetia" Getagazhev identified among casualties of special operation". Caucasian Knot. 24 May 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2014. 
  2. ^ "Ingush Insurgency Commander Affirms Support For Embattled Cleric". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. 2013-08-01. Retrieved 2013-08-01. 
  3. ^ a b "Rebels in Ingushetia Target Police Under New Jammat Leadership". Jamestown Foundation. 20 March 2014. Retrieved 20 March 2014. 
  4. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAqn1CTbfYs
  5. ^ "War in Ingushetia continues".