Arthur Kellermann

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Arthur L. Kellermann (born 1955) is an American physician, epidemiologist, professor and Dean of the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.[1] Kellerman served as Director of the RAND Institute of Health and founded the department of emergency medicine at Emory University and the Center for Injury Control at Rollins School of Public Health. His writings include 200 publications on various aspects of emergency cardiac care, health services research, injury prevention and the role of emergency departments in providing health care to the poor.[2][3][4][5] Kellermann is known for his research on the epidemiology of firearm related injuries and deaths.[6]

Education[edit]

Kellermann received a Bachelor of Science with distinction in biology from Rhodes College (1976), an M.D. from the Emory University School of Medicine (1980), and an M.P.H. from the University of Washington School of Public Health (1985).

Career[edit]

Kellermann was a professor of emergency medicine and public health at Emory School of Medicine from1999 to 2010. He co-chaired the Institute's Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance, which produced six reports on "America's uninsured crisis: Consequences for health and health care" from 2001 to 2004.[2] At Emory, Kellermann served as the associate dean for health policy (2007-2010), the first chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine (1999-2007), and the director of the Emory Center for Injury Control at the Rollins School of Public Health (1993-2006). In 2007, Kellermann received John G. Wiegenstein Leadership Award by the American College of Emergency Physicians.[7]

From 2006 to 2007 he was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellow and joined the staff of the United States House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. In 2007 he was presented with the John G. Wiegenstein Leadership Award by the American College of Emergency Physicians.[3][7]

Kellermann was Chair in Policy Analysis at the RAND Corporation (2010-2013) and vice president and director at RAND Health (2011-2012). He co-chaired the Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, of which he is an elected member. Kellermann holds career achievement awards for excellence in science from the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, and the Injury Control and Emergency Health Services Section of the American Public Health Association.[2] Kellermann is a fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians and an elected member of the US National Academy of Sciences in the Institute of Medicine.

Research[edit]

Kellermann's work includes more than 200 scientific and lay publications on various aspects of advanced cardiac life support, health services research, injury prevention and the role of emergency departments in providing health care to the poor.[2][5] Kellermann is known for his research on the epidemiology of firearm-related injuries and deaths in the US. In a 1995 interview, Kellermann said he saw firearm injuries not as random, unavoidable acts but as preventable public health priority.[6] Kellermann's studies, which indicate an increased risk of mortality associated with gun ownership, have been attacked by gun-rights organizations and individuals, including the National Rifle Association.[8]

Kellermann published several high-profile studies on the topic of gun-related injuries. In 1986, he coauthored a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine finding that for every self-defense homicide via firearm, there were 43 suicides, criminal homicides, or accidental gunshot deaths.[9] He coauthored additional studies published in the New England Journal of Medicine identifying firearm ownership as a risk factor for both homicide and suicide in the home.[8][10][11][12][12][13]

Kellermann has published extensively in the areas of emergency medicine and public health, including studies of emergency cardiac care, use of diagnostic technologies in the emergency department, and on the use of progesterone as a treatment for traumatic brain injury.[14] He has also published research on the role of emergency departments in providing health care to the poor, the role of insurance, and the situation of the uninsured. In recent years, he has written about domestic preparedness to respond to different forms of terrorism.[15] Kellermann was instrumental in the planning and implementation of the American Heart Association's "Racing the Clock to Restart Atlanta's Hearts" initiative. He also played a role in the Institute of Medicine’s three-volume report on the Future of Emergency Care in the United States.[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Arthur L. Kellermann, MD, MPH". Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Retrieved February 23, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Arthur Kellermann, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.E.P.", Robert Wood Johnson Foundation National Advisory Committee
  3. ^ a b "Emory Center for Emergency Control Faculty"
  4. ^ "Curriculum Vitae, Arthur L Kellermann, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.E.P.", University of Texas System News 2007
  5. ^ a b "Art Kellermann Named New Director of RAND Health" (Press release). RAND Corporation Office of Media Relations. November 17, 2010. 
  6. ^ a b Thomas, John D. (Summer 1995). "Accidents Don't Happen". Emory University Magazine. 
  7. ^ a b "John G. Wiegenstein Leadership Award". American College of Emergency Physicians. 
  8. ^ a b Thompson, Bob (March 29, 1998). "Trigger Points". The Washington Post Magazine. 
  9. ^ Kellermann AL, Reay DT (1986). "Protection or peril? An analysis of firearm-related deaths in the home.". N Engl J Med 314 (24): 1557–60. doi:10.1056/NEJM198606123142406. PMID 3713749. 
  10. ^ Kellermann AL, Rivara FP, Somes G, Reay DT, Francisco J, Banton JG, Prodzinski J, Fligner C, Hackman BB (1992). "Suicide in the home in relation to gun ownership.". N Engl J Med 327 (7): 467–72. doi:10.1056/NEJM199208133270705. PMID 1308093. 
  11. ^ Kellermann AL, Rivara FP, Rushforth NB, Banton JG, Reay DT, Francisco JT, Locci AB, Prodzinski J, Hackman BB, Somes G (1993). "Gun ownership as a risk factor for homicide in the home.". N Engl J Med 329 (15): 1084–91. doi:10.1056/NEJM199310073291506. PMID 8371731. 
  12. ^ a b Johnson, Carrie (January 14, 2013). "Lack Of Up-To-Date Research Complicates Gun Debate". National Public Radio. 
  13. ^ Lupkin, Sidney (April 9, 2013). "CDC Ban on Gun Research Caused Lasting Damage". 20/20 (ABC News). 
  14. ^ Wright DW, Kellermann AL, Hertzberg VS, Clark PL, Frankel M, Goldstein FC, Salomone JP, Dent LL, Harris OA, Ander DS, Lowery DW, Patel MM, Denson DD, Gordon AB, Wald MM, Gupta S, Hoffman SW, Stein DG (2007). "ProTECT: a randomized clinical trial of progesterone for acute traumatic brain injury.". Ann Emerg Med 49 (4): 391–402, 402.e1–2. doi:10.1016/j.annemergmed.2006.07.932. PMID 17011666. 
  15. ^ Kellermann, Arthur (August 5, 2005). "Still Not Ready in The ER". Washington Post. 
  16. ^ "The Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System". Institute of Medicine. August 27, 2012.