Arthur Livermore

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For the science educator, see Arthur H. Livermore.
Arthur Livermore
Arthur Livermore
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's At-Large district
In office
March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1821
Preceded by Daniel Webster
Succeeded by Thomas Whipple, Jr.
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's At-Large district
In office
March 4, 1823 – March 3, 1825
Preceded by Nathaniel Upham
Succeeded by Titus Brown
Member of the New Hampshire Senate
In office
1821–1822
Member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives
In office
1794–1795
Personal details
Born (1766-07-29)July 29, 1766
Londonderry, New Hampshire, U.S.
Died July 1, 1853(1853-07-01) (aged 86)
Campton, New Hampshire, U.S.
Resting place Trinity Churchyard, Holderness, New Hampshire
Citizenship US
Political party Democratic-Republican
Adams-Clay Republican
Spouse(s) Louisa Bliss Livermore
Relations Samuel Livermore
Edward St. Loe Livermore
Children Edward Livermore
Samuel Livermore
Horace Livermore
Profession Lawyer
Politician
Judge

Arthur Livermore (July 29, 1766 – July 1, 1853) was an American politician and a United States Representative from New Hampshire.

Early life[edit]

Born in Londonderry, New Hampshire, Livermore received classical instruction from his parents and also studied law. Later, he was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Concord in 1792 and then moved to Chester the following year.

Career[edit]

Livermore was a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives in 1794 and 1795 and the solicitor for Rockingham County 1796-1798. After moving to Holderness in 1798, he became an associate justice of the superior court 1798-1809 and chief justice 1809-1813.[1] He served as a presidential elector on the Federalist ticket in 1800 and as an associate justice of the New Hampshire Supreme Court 1813-1816.

Elected as a Democratic-Republican as United States Representative for New Hampshire to the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Congresses, Livermore served from March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1821. He served as chairman of both the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads (Fifteenth and Sixteenth Congresses) and the Committee on Expenditures in the Post Office Department (Sixteenth Congress). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1822 to the Seventeenth Congress. He served in the New Hampshire Senate in 1821 and 1822, judge of probate for Grafton County in 1822 and 1823.[2]

Livermore was elected as an Adams-Clay Republican representing New Hampshire to the Eighteenth Congress and served from March 4, 1823 – March 3, 1825. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1824. After leaving Congress, he was the chief justice of the court of common pleas 1825-1832, moved to Campton, New Hampshire in 1827, and was a trustee of Holmes Plymouth Academy 1808-1826.

Death[edit]

Livermore Died in Campton, Grafton County, New Hampshire, on July 1, 1853 (age 86 years, 337 days). He is interred at Trinity Churchyard, Holderness, New Hampshire.

Personal life[edit]

Livermore was the son of Samuel Livermore, and the brother of Edward St. Loe Livermore, both of whom served in the United States Congress. He married Louisa Bliss, daughter of Major Joseph Bliss.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Livermore, Arthur. The New Hampshire Register and Farmer's Almanac. New Hampshire. p. 22. 
  2. ^ Livermore, Arthur. Congressional serial set. United States. Government Printing Office. p. 812. 

External links[edit]


United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Daniel Webster
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's At-large congressional district

1817-1821
Succeeded by
Thomas Whipple, Jr.
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Nathaniel Upham
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Hampshire's At-large congressional district

1823-1825
Succeeded by
Titus Brown