Arts NSW

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Arts NSW
Agency overview
Preceding Agency Communities NSW
Jurisdiction New South Wales
Headquarters 323 Castlereagh Street, Sydney
Minister responsible Hon. Troy Grant MP, Minister for Hospitality, Gaming and Racing, and Minister for the Arts
Agency executive Mary Darwell,
Executive Director
Parent Agency Department of Trade and Investment, Regional Infrastructure and Services
Child agencies Art Gallery of NSW
Australian Museum
Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences
Sydney Opera House Trust
State Library of NSW
Screen NSW
Website http://www.arts.nsw.gov.au/

Arts NSW is the Government of New South Wales's arts and cultural policy and development body. Arts NSW provides support to artists and key arts and cultural organisations through infrastructure and funding programs, and targeted strategies. Through their activities, Arts NSW works collaboratively with the NSW cultural institutions, the arts and cultural sector, and partners within government.

Arts NSW is part of the Department of Trade and Investment, Regional Infrastructure and Services (New South Wales) and works to: increase investment in the arts; support a positive business environment in NSW; and achieve excellence in client service and delivery.

Arts NSW is led by its Executive Director, Mary Darwell, who reports to the Deputy Secretary of the Department of Trade and Investment, Regional Infrastructure and Services, Angus Armour. The Secretary of the Department is Mark Paterson AO. Both the Executive Director for Arts NSW and the Secretary of the Department report to the Minister for Hospitality, Gaming and Racing, and Minister for the Arts, the Honourable Troy Grant MP.

Activities[edit]

Arts NSW works to build a dynamic and creative State which values artists and the State’s cultural heritage, as well as working to ensure that the State’s economy is strengthened by the capacity of creative industries to generate wealth and create jobs. This is achieved by providing an extensive range of support for the NSW arts sector, including policy development, infrastructure investment, strategic partnerships, and a revitalised arts funding program.

The NSW Government’s arts portfolio is divided into Arts NSW, Screen NSW and the NSW cultural institutions – the Sydney Opera House, the State Library of New South Wales, the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Australian Museum.[1]

The NSW performing arts sector includes 11 of Australia’s major performing arts organisations. These companies are internationally renowned and have a commitment to excellence in performance, working in the fields of dance, theatre, opera, orchestra and chamber music including The Australian Ballet, Australian Brandenburg Orchestra, Australian Chamber Orchestra, Bangarra Dance Theatre, Bell Shakespeare Company, Belvoir, Musica Viva Australia, Opera Australia, Sydney Dance Company, Sydney Symphony Orchestra, and the Sydney Theatre Company.[2]

Arts NSW provides support for major cultural festivals including the Biennale of Sydney, the Sydney Festival, the Sydney Film Festival, and the Sydney Writers' Festival;[3] and some of Australia’s leading visual arts organisations including the Artspace Visual Arts Centre, the Australian Centre for Photography, d/Lux/MediaArts, the Museum of Contemporary Art, and Object: Australian Design Centre.[4]

Arts NSW works collaboratively with artists and arts workers, the arts and cultural sector and partners within government to grow NSW creative industries.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Arts in NSW: State cultural institutions". Arts NSW. Government of New South Wales. 2014. Retrieved 13 June 2014. 
  2. ^ "The Arts in NSW: Major performing arts organisations". Arts NSW. Government of New South Wales. 2014. Retrieved 13 June 2014. 
  3. ^ "The Arts in NSW: Major festivals". Arts NSW. Government of New South Wales. 2014. Retrieved 13 June 2014. 
  4. ^ "The Arts in NSW: Visual arts and craft organisations". Arts NSW. Government of New South Wales. 2014. Retrieved 13 June 2014. 

External links[edit]