Arun-class lifeboat

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Arun Class Lifeboat
Class overview
Builders: 52-01/2, 54-03 William Osborne, Littlehampton
Others, hulls moulded by Halmatic Ltd. Fitted out by :-
William Osbourne
Halmatic
W.A Souter
Fairey Marine
Berthon Boat Co.
Robsons
Operators: RNLI FLAG.png Royal National Lifeboat Institution
Preceded by: Waveney
Succeeded by: Severn
Cost: £128,000 (52-01) – £640,000 (52-46)
Built: 1971–1990
In service: 1971–2008
Completed: 46
Retired: 46
Preserved: 1
General characteristics
Displacement: 32 long tons (33 t)
Length: 52 ft (16 m) or 54 ft (16 m)
Beam: 17 ft (5.2 m)
Draught: 5 ft (1.5 m)
Propulsion: 52-02 to 52-14: 2 x 460 bhp Caterpillar D343 6-cylinder
52-15 to 52-46: 2 x 485 bhp Caterpillar 3408TA V-8
Speed: 18.5 knots (21.3 mph)
Range: 250 nautical miles (460 km)
Complement: 6

The Arun-class lifeboat was a fast all-weather lifeboat designed by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) for service at its stations around the coasts of the United Kingdom and Ireland. They were operated by the RNLI between 1971 and 2008. Many have been sold to see further service in the lifeboat and coastguard services of other countries.

The class takes its name from the River Arun in Sussex, England.

History[edit]

The RNLI's first lifeboat capable of speeds in excess of 10 knots (12 mph) was the 14 knots (16 mph) Waveney-class introduced in 1967. This was based on an American design, but in 1971 it was supplemented by the Arun-class which was designed by the RNLI and gave vastly improved accommodation and increased the speed to 18.5 knots (21.3 mph).[1]

The first prototype boat entered service at St Peter Port in 1972 but moved on to Barry Dock where it was stationed until 1997. Two more boats were introduced in 1973 and 1974 and then full production started in 1975 although small numbers of Waveney-class boats were still built until 1982. By 1990, 46 Arun-class boats had been launched. The following year saw the launch of the first 25 knots (29 mph) Severn- and Trent-class boats.[2]

The three prototype boats were withdrawn between 1994 and 1997, the third of which then went on display at the National Lifeboat Museum. The production series boats were taken out of regular service between 1998 and 2007. While a few have found new uses around the coast of Great Britain, the majority have been sold to other lifeboat operators around the world, predominantly in China, Finland and Iceland[2] and some further boats were built new for service in Canada and Greece.[3] Those travelling long distances go as deck cargo on larger ships but those going to closer harbours are generally sailed across under their own power. The first boat to go to Iceland, the Richard Evans, was loaded as deck cargo on a container ship but was washed overboard during the passage – the only Arun to have been lost at sea.[4]

Design[edit]

The design was developed for the RNLI by J.A. MacLachlan working for naval architects G.L. Watson of Glasgow. Initially proposed with 'chines' along the hull to disperse the spray and improve stability when underway at speed, this caused a high deck above water which proved difficult when trying to get people aboard from the water, so the chines were dispensed with on the second boat and the deck curved down nearer the water.[5] The first three boats were built with wooden hulls[6] and were respectively 51 feet 7 inches (15.72 m), 52 feet (16 m) and 54 feet (16 m) long, the extra length due to a rounded transom. All differed in superstructure design, 52-01 having a raked back superstructure front with the flying bridge at the after end. 52-02 introduced forward raked wheelhouse windscreens, had a unique wheelhouse side window pattern and retained the aft mounted flying bridge. On 52-03, the flying bridge was moved to the forward end of the wheelhouse, the front of which was rounded. From 54-04, the forward flying bridge was standardised and the forward raked wheelhouse windscreens were reintroduced. The side windows were recessed fron the superstructure sides. 54-04 had a Glass Reinforce Plastic hull and this was standardised for future boats. 54-04 to 54-07 retained the rounded transon but from 52-08 a square transom was reintroduced. The final external change came with 52-11 which had flush sided forward wheelhouse windows and this was a feature of all subsequent boats.In 1986 52-030 (ON 1100) became the only steel hulled Arun. It was regarded as the best of the class for seakeeping, although the slowest.[citation needed] The GRP hulls were moulded in blue material in the outer skin. After a while it was found that water was accumulating in the fibreglass which added up to 2 tons to the weight. The boats had the coloured layer stripped off and replaced by a new one made with clear gel which reduced the amount of water absorbed.[5]

The large watertight cabin gave it self-righting capability. Two survivor cabins are situated below decks where first aid and emergency equipment is stowed. The hull is divided into 26 watertight compartments as protection against sinking should it be holed. There is also a flying bridge above the main cabin with an auxiliary steering position which can be used when additional height or visibility is required during an operation. The boat won a Design Council award in 1982.[6]

Two Caterpillar D343 460 hp (340 kW) diesel engines were fitted to boats up 52-14, subsequent boats being fitted with two Caterpillar 3408TA 485 hp (362 kW) . Fuel tanks have 620 gallon capacity which gives an operating range of 250 nautical miles (460 km).[6]

RNLI fleet[edit]

ON[a] Op. No.[b] Name Built In service Principal stations Further use
1018 52-01 Arun 1971 1972–1997 Barry Dock Commercial use at Dundee
1025 52-02 Sir William Arnold 1973 1973–1997 St Peter Port Pleasure boat at Cork
1037 54-03 Edward Bridges (C.S. No. 37) 1974 1975–1994 Torbay Preserved at Chatham Historic Dockyard
1049 54-04 Tony Vandervell 1976 1975–1999 Weymouth Finland
1050 54-05 B.P. Forties 1975 1975–1998 Aberdeen Iceland
1051 54-06 The Gough Ritchie 1976 1976–1998 Port St Mary Chile
1052 54-07 City of Bradford IV 1976 1977–1987
1991–1998
Humber
Tobermory
Ship's tender in Sweden
1053 52-08 Joy and John Wade 1977 1977–2001 Yarmouth Iceland
1056 52-09 Spirit of Tayside 1978 1978–1999 Broughty Ferry Australia
1057 52-10 Solidan 1978 1978–1997
1997–2001
Lerwick
Relief fleet
Iceland
1058 52-11 Elizabeth Ann 1979 1979–2001 Falmouth Australia
1059 52-12 Walter and Margaret Couper 1979 1979–2001 Campbeltown Finland
1061 52-13 George and Olive Turner 1980 1980–2000 Tynemouth Iceland
1062 52-14 Edith Emilie 1980 1980–1999 Pilot boat at Montrose
1067 52-15 Hyman Winstone 1980 1980–1985
1985–1998
1998–2002
Relief fleet
Ballycotton
Relief fleet
Madeira
1070 52-16 Richard Evans (C.S. No. 39) 1981 1981–2000
2000–2003
Portrush
Relief fleet
Sold to Iceland but wrecked during delivery.
1071 52-17 Sir Max Aitken 1981 1981–2001 Trip boat on the River Crouch
1073 52-18 Robert Edgar 1981 1981–1997
1997–2002
St Mary's
Relief fleet
Pleasure boat in New Zealand
1076 52-19 Marie Winstone 1981 1981–1994
1995–2002
Fishguard
Torbay
Finland
1077 52-20 Duchess of Kent 1982 1982–2002 Madeira
1078 52-21 The Davina and Charles Matthew Hunter 1982 1982–2001
2001–2003
Mallaig
Relief fleet
Iceland
1081 52-22 Ralph and Bonella Farrant 1982 1982–1994
1994–1999
1999–2003
Relief fleet
Fenit
Relief fleet
China
1082 52-23 Margaret Frances Love 1982 1983–1996
1997–2003
Valentia
Barry Dock
China
1085 52-24 Mabel Alice 1982 1983–2003 Penlee Trip boat at Portishead
1086 52-25 A.J.R. & L.G. Uridge 1983 1983–2003 Finland
1092 52-26 St Brendan 1984 1984–2001 Rosslare Harbour Fishing boat at Holyhead
1093 52-27 Charles Brown 1984 1984–2005 Buckie China
1098 52-28 Sir Max Allen II 1984 1984–1999
1999–2004
2004–2005
Stornoway
Longhope
Relief fleet
China
1099 52-29 The Joseph Rothwell Sykes and Hilda M 1984 1984–1998
1998–2002
Stromness
Relief fleet
Finland
1100 52-030 Snolda 1986 1986–1998
1998–2007
Aith
Relief fleet
Iceland
1103 52-31 Newsbuoy 1984 1984–2004 Faroe Islands
1106 52-32 Keith Anderson 1985 1985–1999
1999–2003
Newhaven
Relief fleet
China
1107 52-33 City of Belfast 1985 1985–2003 Donaghadee China
1108 52-34 Margaret Russell Fraser 1984 1986–2004 Calshot Iceland
1113 52-35 City of Dublin 1986 1986–2003 Howth Iceland
1118 52-36 Roy and Barbara Harding 1987 1987–1997
1997–2004
Galway Bay
Castletownbere
Iceland
1123 52-37 Kenneth Thelwall 1987 1987–1997
1997–2003
2003–2004
Humber
Holyhead
Relief fleet
China
1134 52-38 City of Glasgow III 1987 1987–2005 Troon Iceland
1135 52-39 Mickie Salvensen 1988 1988–1998
1998–2006
Kirkwall
Relief fleet
Iceland
1136 52-40 City of Plymouth 1987 1988–2004 Plymouth Iceland
1143 52-41 Ann Lewis Fraser 1988 1988–1998
1998–2003
2003–2004
Barra Island
Tobermory
Relief fleet
China
1144 52-42 Murray Lornie 1988 1989–2005 Lochinver Iceland
1149 52-43 The Queen Mother 1989 1989–2009 Thurso Sold to the Montevideo Pilot Association, Uruguay as Ederra 4[7]
1150 52-44 Hibernia 1989 1989–2007 China
1159 52-45 Mabel Williams 1990 1990–1998
1998–2007
Ballyglass
Relief fleet
China
1160 52-46 Duke of Atholl 1990 1990–2007 Iceland
  1. ^ ON is the RNLI's Official Number of the boat.
  2. ^ Op. No. is the RNLI's Operational Number of the boat carried on the hull.

Other fleets[edit]

Australia[edit]

Name RNLI ON Built Sold Station[2]
P V Danial Thain 1056 1978 1999 Port Stephens, New South Wales
P&O Nedlloyd Encounter 1058 1979 2002 Ulladulla, New South Wales

Canada[edit]

CCGS Spray

Ten 15.77 metres (51.7 ft) boats were built for the Canadian Coast Guard.[3] They were all built in Canada by Industrie Raymond Ltée, Sept-Iles QC; East Isle Shipyard Ltd., Georgetown PE; Hike Metals & Shipbuilbing Ltd., Wheatley ON, with aluminium hulls except for the GRP-hulled British-built prototype (CCGS Bickerton) which was built by Halmatic, Southampton.[citation needed] They are considered "high endurance" lifeboats staffed by a crew of four. The first vessels of this class were ordered in 1990.[8] The Canadian Coast Guard also maintains approximately three dozen smaller Cape class motor life boats.[9] They are considered "medium endurance" lifeboats.

Name Built Sold Station
CCGS Bickerton 1989 Bickerton East, Nova Scotia
CCGS Cap aux Meules 1996 Cap-aux-Meules, Iles de la Madeleine, Quebec
CCGS Clarks Harbour 1996 Port Hardy, British Columbia
CCGS Courtney Bay 1994 Saint John, New Brunswick
CCGS Sambro 1996 Sambro, Nova Scotia
CCGS Spindrift 1992 Louisbourg, Nova Scotia
CCGS Spray 1994 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
CCGS W.G. George 1994 Burgeo, Newfoundland and Labrador
CCGS W. Jackman 1994 Burin, Newfoundland and Labrador
CCGS Westport 1997 Westport, Nova Scotia

Chile[edit]

Name RNLI ON Built Sold Station Comments[2]
Capitan Eduardo Simpson Roth 1051 1976 1998 Valparaíso 54 ft (16 m) boat

China[edit]

Name RNLI ON Built Sold Station[2]
Huaying 390 1150 1989 2007 Waigaoqiao
Huaying 391 1159 1990 2007 Donghai
Huaying 392 1143 1988 2006 Shantou
Huaying 393 1081 1982 2004 Fuzhou
Huaying 394 1107 1985 2004 Dalian
Huaying 395 1106 1985 2004 Dalian
Huaying 396 1093 1984 2005 Shenzen
Huaying 397 1098 1984 2005 Zhangjiang
Huaying 398 1082 1982 2004 Donghai, Shanghai
Huaying 399 1123 1987 2004 Wenzhou, Zhejiang

Faroe Islands[edit]

Name RNLI ON Built Sold Station[2]
Ziska 1103 1984 2005 Klaksvik, Faroe Islands

Finland[edit]

Name RNLI ON Built Sold Station Comments[2]
Hebe 1086 1983 2003 Kemi Relocated in Hanko
Janne Malén 1099 1984 2002 Uusikaupunki
Mac Elliot 1049 1975 1999 Porkkala (1999-2008), Porvoo (2008-2013) 54 ft (16 m) boat, sold to Kronstadt,Russia
Russarö 1059 1979 2001 Hanko (2001-2013) sold to Kronstadt,Russia
Torbay 1076 1981 2002 Kaskinen

Greece[edit]

The Greek boats were built in Greece by MotoMarine with GRP hulls.[10] Ten are in service with the Hellenic Cost Guard.[11]

Iceland[edit]

Name RNLI ON Built Sold Station Comments[2]
Asgimur S Bjornsson 1057 1978 2002 Reykjavík
Bjorg 1053 1977 2002 Rif
Einar Sigurjonsson 1078 1982 2003 Hafnarfjörður
Jon Oddgeir[citation needed] 1061 1980 2000 Relief Reported for sale in 2008, previously Gunnar Fridriksson but replaced by ON 1160.
1070 1981 2003 Wrecked on passage to Iceland
Gunnbjorg 1118 1987 2004 Raufarhofn Replacement for ON 1070 lost on passage
Hafbjorg 1113 1986 2004 Neskaupstadur
Hannes Þ Hafstein 1050 1975 1999 Sandgerdi[citation needed] 54 ft (16 m) boat,previously Oddur V Gislason but replaced by 1100.
Hunabjorg 1136 1987 2005 Skagastrond
Ingibjorg 1108 1986 2006 Hornafjordur
Oddur V Gislason 1100 1986 2007 Grindavik Steel hull
Sigurvin 1144 198 2005 Siglufjordur
Sveinbjörn Sveinsson 1134 1987 2006 Vopnafjordur
Vordur II 1135 1988 2006 Patreksfjordur
Gunnar Fridriksson [citation needed] 1160 1990 2007 Isafjordur

Madeira[edit]

Name RNLI ON[2] Built Sold Station
Salvador do Mar 1067 1980 2003 SANAS
 ? 1077 1982 2003 SANAS

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wake-Walker, Edward (2008). The Lifeboats Story. Stroud: Sutton Publishing. pp. 59–63. ISBN 978-0-7509-4858-6. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Denton, Tony (2009). Handbook 2009. Shrewsbury: Lifeboat Enthusiasts Society. pp. 26–33. 
  3. ^ a b Leach 2011, pp. 34-35
  4. ^ Kipling, Ray; Kipling, Susannah (2006). Never Turn Back. Stroud: Sutton Publishing. p. 173. ISBN 0-7509-4307-6. 
  5. ^ a b Kipling, Ray; Kipling, Susannah (2006). Never Turn Back. Stroud: Sutton Publishing. pp. 85–87. ISBN 0-7509-4307-6. 
  6. ^ a b c Wake-Walker, Edward; Deane, Heather and Purches, Georgette (1989). Lifeboat! Royal National Lifeboat Institution. Shepperton: Ian Allan. pp. 38–41. ISBN 0-7110-1835-9. 
  7. ^ Leach 2011, p. 122
  8. ^ "Fishermen's union: Supports plan to move Coast Guard lifeboat". North Island Gazette. 1990-02-07. Retrieved 2009-09-13. 
  9. ^ "New vessels ordered for Canadian Coast Guard". Marine Log. 2009-09-03. Archived from the original on 2009-09-12. 
  10. ^ http://www.motomarine.gr/military/index.html
  11. ^ Hellenic Coast Guard

Bibliography[edit]

  • Leach, Nicholas (2011). Arun Lifeboats - An Illustrated History of the RNLI Arun lifeboats 1971-2009. Cudham, Kent, United Kingdom: Kelsey Publishing Group. ISBN 978-1-907426-21-6.