Asa Kasher

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Asa Kasher
Asa Kasher
Born (1940-06-06) June 6, 1940 (age 74)
Jerusalem, Mandatory Palestine
Citizenship Israeli
Education Ph.D. in Philosophy, 1971, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Occupation Philosopher and linguist
Employer Tel Aviv University
Awards 2000 Israel Prize for philosophy

Asa Kasher (Hebrew: אסא כשר‎, born on June 6, 1940) is an Israeli philosopher and linguist working as a Professor at Tel Aviv University, Israel.[1]

Biography[edit]

Asa Kasher is the grandson of talmudist Menachem Mendel Kasher. He is noted for authorship of Israel Defense Forces's Code of Conduct.[2] He wrote an influential defense of Israel's 'law of return', justifying it as a form of affirmative action, following periods in which Jews were not allowed to immigrate to many countries.[3][4]

He also wrote about possible meanings to a Jewish and democratic state, the meaning of a Jewish collective and many other essays.[5] His essays on Jewish subjects are collected in a book titled Ruach Ish (Spirit of a Man), published in Hebrew by Am Oved publication house. He is also the editor of the philosophy journal Philosophia.[6] Kasher has contributed as well to the fields of psychology and ethics.

Awards[edit]

In 2000, Kasher was awarded Israel Prize for philosophy.[7][8]

Criticism[edit]

Uri Avnery criticised Kasher for arguing in favour of targeted killing by the IDF,[9][10][11] in those cases in which it knowingly fires on targets where civilians are present or nearby if enemy forces are also known to be present, and that "it is justified to kill a Palestinian child who is in the company of a hundred 'terrorists'" because the terrorists might kill children.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Yoram Hazony. The Jewish state: the struggle for Israel's soul. Retrieved August 28, 2011. 
  3. ^ Chaim Gans. The limits of nationalism. Retrieved August 28, 2011. 
  4. ^ Israel studies forum: an interdisciplinary journal, Volumes 22-23. Association for Israel Studies. 2007. Retrieved August 28, 2011. 
  5. ^ Raphael Cohen-Almagor. Israeli democracy at the crossroads. Retrieved August 28, 2011. 
  6. ^ Samantha Brennan, Robert Stainton (August 31, 2009). Philosophy and death: introductory readings. Retrieved August 28, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Israel Prize Official Site (in Hebrew) – Recipient’s C.V.". 
  8. ^ "Israel Prize Official Site (in Hebrew)- Judges' Rationale for Grant to Recipient". 
  9. ^ Seumas Miller (2009). Terrorism and counter-terrorism; ethics and liberal democracy. Blackwell Pub. Retrieved August 28, 2011. 
  10. ^ Gary D. Solis (2010). The law of armed conflict: international humanitarian law in war. Cambridge University Press. Retrieved August 28, 2011. 
  11. ^ Alan M. Dershowitz (2009). The Case Against Israel's Enemies: Exposing Jimmy Carter and Others Who Stand in the Way of Peace. John Wiley and Sons. Retrieved August 28, 2011. 
  12. ^ The Johnny Procedure, by Uri Avnery. July 18, 2009

External links[edit]