Asadullah Jan

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Asadullah Jan
Born 1985 (age 28–29)
Swahbi, Pakistan
Citizenship Pakistan
Detained at Guantanamo
Alternate name Asad Ullah
ISN 47
Charge(s) No charge (held in extrajudicial detention)
Status Repatriated 16 July 2003

Asadullah Jan is a citizen of Pakistan who was held in extrajudicial detention in the United States's Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba.[1] His Guantanamo Internment Serial Number was 47. Joint Task Force -- Guantanamo analysts estimate he was born in 1981. But he says he was only sixteen when he was captured in 2001.

Joint Task Force Guantanamo analysts assert he is a citizen of Pakistan. He said he was a child of Afghan refugees, who was born in Pakistan.

Joint Task Force Guantanamo analysts assert his name was "Asad Ullah". But in interviews with reporters with the McClatchy News Service in 2008 he said his name was "Asadullah Jan".

He was repatriated 16 July 2003.[2]

McClatchy News Service interview[edit]

On June 15, 2008 the McClatchy News Service published a series of articles based on interviews with 66 former Guantanamo captives.[3] Asadullah Jan was one of thee former captives who had an article profiling him.[4][5][6][7][8][9]

Asadullah Jan explained that he was returning from a visit to relatives in Zormat when he was stopped at a checkpoint in Kohat, Pakistan and apprehended around the time of Ramadan, 2001.[9][10] He was held in Pakistan, for approximately a month before his first interrogation by Americans.

His first interview was by a woman and two men, in civilian clothes, at the Pakistani jail.[9]

His interpreter said they were with the CIA, although they didn't identify themselves. He told his McClatchy interviewer their questions surprised him—apparently Pakistani security officials had told them he was a son of Osama bin Laden. The CIA officials had him transferred to US custody in the Kandahar detention facility. Guards beat him brutally upon his arrival, and routinely beat him and other captives, while he was detained there. His interrogators however never beat him. He described the conditions in the camp as primitive:

"We were sitting on the ground, in winter, with no blanket. I had bruises on my body from the beating; my bones hurt."[9]

Asadullah Jan told his interviewer he personally saw a guard drop a Koran into a latrine.[9]

Asadullah Jan told his interviewer he was plagued by memories of Guantanamo, that mention of the USA would bring back troubling recollections.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006". United States Department of Defense. Retrieved 2006-05-15. 
  2. ^ OARDEC (2008-10-09). "Consolidate chronological listing of GTMO detainees released, transferred or deceased". Department of Defense. Archived from the original on 27 December 2008. Retrieved 2008-12-28. 
  3. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 15, 2008). "Guantanamo Inmate Database: Page 3". Miami Herald. Retrieved 2008-06-17.  mirror
  4. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 18, 2008). "U.S. hasn't apologized to or compensated ex-detainees". Myrtle Beach Sun. Retrieved 2008-06-18.  mirror
  5. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 15, 2008). "Pentagon declined to answer questions about detainees". McClatchy News Service. Archived from the original on 15 June 2008. Retrieved 2008-06-20.  mirror
  6. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 16, 2008). "Documents undercut Pentagon's denial of routine abuse". McClatchy News Service. Archived from the original on 19 June 2008. Retrieved 2008-06-20.  mirror
  7. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 19, 2008). "Deck stacked against detainees in legal proceedings". McClatchy News Service. Archived from the original on 20 June 2008. Retrieved 2008-06-20.  mirror
  8. ^ Tom Lasseter (June 16, 2008). "U.S. abuse of detainees was routine at Afghanistan bases". McClatchy News Service. Archived from the original on 20 June 2008. Retrieved 2008-06-20.  mirror
  9. ^ a b c d e f Tom Lasseter (June 15, 2008). "Guantanamo Inmate Database: Asadullah Jan". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on 20 June 2008. Retrieved 2008-06-16.  mirror
  10. ^ Ramadan coincided with November in 2001.

External links[edit]