Asanowaka Takehiko

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Asanowaka Takehiko
朝乃若武彦
Asanowaka 2010.JPG
Personal information
Born Takehiko Adachi
(1969-12-11) December 11, 1969 (age 44)
Aichi, Japan
Height 1.76 m (5 ft 9 12 in)
Weight 144 kg (317 lb)
Career
Stable WakamatsuTakasago
Record 547-598-7
Debut March, 1992
Highest rank Maegashira 1
Retired May, 2005
Championships 1 (Jūryō)
1 (Makushita)
* Up to date as of May, 2008.

Asanowaka Takehiko (born 11 December 1969 as Takehiko Adachi) is a former sumo wrestler from Ichinomiya, Aichi Prefecture, Japan. His highest rank was maegashira 1. He is now a sumo coach.

Career[edit]

A former amateur sumo champion at Kinki University, he was recruited by ex-ōzeki Asashio (himself a former collegiate competitor) and joined Wakamatsu stable (later Takasago stable) in March 1992. He began as a makushita tsukedashi, meaning he could make his debut at the bottom of the third makushita division. He was promoted to the second jūryō division in January 1993 and captured the tournament championship in that division in November 1993 with a score of 11-4. Following a 9-6 in January 1994 he was promoted to the top makuuchi division in March of that year.

Asanowaka never managed to reach the titled san'yaku ranks or win a special prize. He was also unable to defeat any yokozuna and had only one win against an ōzeki (Takanonami in May 1997). Nevertheless, he fought in the top division off and on for ten years and his record of 346 wins there is the best amongst maegashira only wrestlers.[1] He was also very popular with tournament crowds. At the peak of his career he wore an outlandish bright yellow mawashi and would enliven the preliminaries by throwing the purifying salt in a manner that resembled an American football player scoring a touchdown.[2] He would also crouch extremely low to the ground when doing the warm up or shikiri. Eventually he was instructed by the Japan Sumo Association to tone these antics down and in his later years on the dohyō wore a black mawashi and was much more subdued.

Retirement from sumo[edit]

By 2004 Asanowaka was no longer able to hold his own in the top division, and after a disastrous 1-14 score in the jūryō division in March 2005, he announced his retirement the following month. He had not missed a single bout in his career.[3] He has remained in the sumo world as an elder, affiliated to the Takasago stable, and is now known as Wakamatsu Oyakata.

Fighting style[edit]

Asanowaka was of a short build for a sumo wrestler and had limited technique, relying heavily on slap-downs and sidestepping. He was a pusher-thruster, rarely fighting on the mawashi or belt. His most common winning kimarite was oshidashi (push out), followed by hiki-otoshi (pull down) and hataki-komi (slap down). He won only six career bouts by yori-kiri (force out) and was only credited once with a belt throw (an uwatenage in 2001).[4]

Personal life[edit]

Asanowaka married in February 2000 and his wife gave birth to a baby girl in September of that year. The couple's wedding reception was held in January 2001.[5]

Career record[edit]

Asanowaka Takehiko[6]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1992 x Makushita tsukedashi #60
5–2
 
East Makushita #42
5–2
 
East Makushita #23
7–0
Champion

 
East Makushita #4
4–3
 
West Makushita #2
6–1
 
1993 East Jūryō #11
10–5
 
East Jūryō #4
4–11
 
West Jūryō #12
9–6
 
East Jūryō #9
8–7
 
West Jūryō #8
9–6
 
West Jūryō #4
11–4–P
Champion

 
1994 East Jūryō #1
9–6
 
East Maegashira #15
9–6
 
East Maegashira #11
8–7
 
West Maegashira #5
6–9
 
West Maegashira #9
7–8
 
West Maegashira #12
8–7
 
1995 West Maegashira #10
9–6
 
West Maegashira #2
6–9
 
West Maegashira #5
5–10
 
West Maegashira #10
8–7
 
West Maegashira #3
4–11
 
West Maegashira #9
7–8
 
1996 West Maegashira #12
8–7
 
East Maegashira #5
4–11
 
East Maegashira #12
9–6
 
West Maegashira #9
8–7
 
East Maegashira #5
4–11
 
East Maegashira #11
9–6
 
1997 East Maegashira #5
5–10
 
East Maegashira #9
8–7
 
East Maegashira #4
5–10
 
East Maegashira #8
7–8
 
East Maegashira #10
7–8
 
West Maegashira #13
8–7
 
1998 East Maegashira #12
7–8
 
West Maegashira #15
8–7
 
East Maegashira #13
7–8
 
East Maegashira #16
8–7
 
West Maegashira #12
7–8
 
East Maegashira #15
6–9
 
1999 East Jūryō #2
9–6
 
East Maegashira #13
6–9
 
West Jūryō #3
8–7
 
West Jūryō #2
8–7
 
West Maegashira #14
9–6
 
East Maegashira #9
9–6
 
2000 West Maegashira #2
3–12
 
East Maegashira #8
8–7
 
West Maegashira #1
5–10
 
West Maegashira #3
5–10
 
West Maegashira #8
6–9
 
West Maegashira #11
6–9
 
2001 East Maegashira #14
8–7
 
West Maegashira #10
7–8
 
West Maegashira #11
7–8
 
East Maegashira #13
5–10
 
East Jūryō #4
8–7
 
West Jūryō #1
9–6
 
2002 West Maegashira #12
3–12
 
West Jūryō #5
10–5
 
West Maegashira #15
6–9
 
West Jūryō #2
9–6
 
West Maegashira #13
7–8
 
East Maegashira #15
5–10
 
2003 East Jūryō #5
8–7
 
East Jūryō #3
9–6
 
East Maegashira #15
8–7
 
East Maegashira #11
6–9
 
East Maegashira #14
6–9
 
East Jūryō #3
9–6
 
2004 East Maegashira #16
10–5
 
East Maegashira #11
5–10
 
West Maegashira #14
4–11
 
West Jūryō #3
5–10
 
West Jūryō #8
8–7
 
West Jūryō #6
4–11
 
2005 West Jūryō #11
9–6
 
West Jūryō #5
1–14
 
West Makushita #3
Retired
0–0–7
x x x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Makuuchi Win Leaders". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  2. ^ Panek, Mark (2006). Gaijin Yokozuna. University of Hawaii Press. p. 220. ISBN 0-8248-3043-1. 
  3. ^ "Asanowaka calls it a day in sumo". Japan Times. 2005-04-30. Retrieved 2008-05-01. 
  4. ^ "Asanowaka bouts by kimarite". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 12 October 2010. 
  5. ^ Kuroda, Joe (27 January 2001). "Sumo News - January 27, 2001". Sumo Mailing List. Retrieved 12 October 2010. 
  6. ^ "Asanowaka Takehiko Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-09-07. 

External links[edit]