Asarina

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Asarina
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Lamiales
Family: Plantaginaceae
Genus: Asarina
Species

See text.

Asarina is a genus comprising 16 species of strongly sprawling or twining perennials, native to Mexico, southwestern USA, and southern Europe. Originally placed in the Scrophulariaceae (figwort family), they have more recently been moved to the Plantaginaceae (plantain family).[1] Leaves are often triangular, toothed, downy and hairy with twining flower stalks. Flowers are attractive trumpet-shaped with broad green sepals and pale throat-spotted corolla in varying sizes, resemble snapdragons, and may be white, yellow, pink, purple, and shades in between. Some species are often placed in the genus Maurandya.

Cultivation[edit]

They are grown as annuals in cold climates but are longer lasting in warmer climates. They need a warm sheltered position in cool climates or can be grown in the conservatory. Grow in any reasonably fertile well-drained soil and water well in summer. Good for spilling over walls and banks. They prefer to be pruned in winter as they flower more heavily on new growth. New cultivars of this plant are regularly being released from North America and Europe. Propagate from seed and cuttings.

Species[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stevens, Peter F. (2001 onwards), List of Genera in PLANTAGINACEAE, Angiosperm Phylogeny Website, Version 10, retrieved 2010-11-27 
  • Ellison, Don (1999) Cultivated Plants of the World. London: New Holland (1st ed.: Brisbane: Flora Publications International, 1995)
  • Graf, Alfred Byrd (1986) Tropica: color cyclopedia of exotic plants and trees for warm-region horticulture—in cool climate the summer garden or sheltered indoors; 3rd ed. East Rutherford, N.J.: Roehrs Co
  • Lord, Tony (2003) Flora : The Gardener's Bible : More than 20,000 garden plants from around the world. London: Cassell. ISBN 0-304-36435-5
  • Botanica Sistematica