Ascending pharyngeal artery

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Ascending pharyngeal artery
Gray513.png
Ascending pharyngeal.PNG
Superficial dissection of the right side of the neck, showing the carotid and subclavian arteries.
Details
Latin Arteria pharyngea ascendens
Supplies Pharynx
Source
External carotid artery
Identifiers
Gray's p.557
Dorlands
/Elsevier
a_61/12155481
TA A12.2.05.010
FMA FMA:49497
Anatomical terminology

The ascending pharyngeal artery is an artery in the neck that supplies the pharynx.

It is the smallest branch of the external carotid and is a long, slender vessel, deeply seated in the neck, beneath the other branches of the external carotid and under the stylopharyngeus. It lies just superior to the bifurcation of the common carotid artery.

The artery most typically bifurcates into embryologically distinct pharyngeal and neuromeningeal trunks. The pharyngeal trunk usually consists of several branches which supply the constrictores pharyngis medius and inferior and the Stylopharyngeus, ramifying in their substance and in the mucous membranes lining them. These branches are in hemodynamic equilibrium with contributors from the internal maxillary artery. The neuromeningeal trunk classically consists of jugular and hypoglossal divisions, which enter the jugular and hypoglossal foramina to supply regional meningeal and neural structures, being in equilibrium with branches of the vertebral, occipital, posterior meningeal, middle meningeal, and internal carotid arteries (via its caroticotympanic branch, meningohypophyseal, and inferolateral trunks). Also present is the inferior tympanic branch, which ascends towards the middle ear cavity; it is involved in internal carotid artery reconstitution via the "aberrant carotid artery" variant. The muscular branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery is in equilibrium with the odontoid arcade from the vertebral artery.

Course[edit]

It arises from the back part of the external carotid, near the commencement of that vessel, and ascends vertically between the internal carotid and the side of the pharynx, to the under surface of the base of the skull, lying on the longus capitis.

References[edit]

This article incorporates text from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy.

External links[edit]