List of demon lords

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This a List of Demon lords in the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. In the 2nd Edition, the demon lords were known as "Abyssal lords".

Contents

Abraxas[edit]

Abraxas
Game background
Title(s) The Unfathomable
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Magic words, arcane secrets, talismans
Domains Chaos, Evil, Knowledge, Magic, Protection (in Armies of the Abyss)
Superior None
Design details

Abraxas, known as the Unfathomable, is the demon lord of magic words, arcane secrets, and talismans, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Abraxas dwells on the 17th layer of the Abyss, known as Death's Reward.

Abraxas was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[1] Abraxas received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2] Abraxas received further description in the fourth edition book Demonomicon (2010).[3]

In Armies of the Abyss (2002) by Erik Mona, Abraxas is known as the Supreme Unknown and described as resembling a bare-chested man with the head of a rooster and a lower body made of writhing snakes. His areas of concern are listed as magic, occult lore, and dangerous secrets. In this book, Abraxas is the head of a twisted cult based loosely on historical Gnosticism, teaching that the gods are evil tyrants who have imprisoned souls in mortal bodies, while the true world of pure spirit, the Pleroma, lies beyond. In the world of Armies of the Abyss this is portrayed as a devious lie on the part of Abraxas, whose Abyssal layer is actually a trap for his deluded followers. Souls that come to Abraxas's realm experience ten years of bliss before being annihilated and devoured by the Abyss, fueling Abraxas's power. While Abraxas's cult is deliberately offensive to the gods, they experience little prosecution as they are for the most part blameless ascetics who make their living selling protective charms.[4]

Abraxas appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 2: Lords of Chaos (2010), on page 9.[5] In Lords of Chaos (2010) by James Jacobs, Abraxas is known as the Master of the Final Incantation and described as having the head of a deformed bird and two vipers in place of his legs. His portfolio is given as forbidden lore, magic, and snakes. As in Armies of the Abyss, Abraxas's realm is called the Pleroma here, and it is said to be a superficially pleasant and beautiful realm whose true appearance is masked by illusions. Abraxas rules from the spiral city of Diovengia, which is filled with demons, libraries, and serpents and guarded by mariliths. Instead of the chaste ascetics of Armies of the Abyss, however, his cultists in this book are drow and keepers of forbidden lore who maintain a notorious library and tattoo their greatest secrets on their bodies.[6]

Adimarchus[edit]

Adimarchus
Game background
Title(s) Demon Prince of Madness
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, Adimarchus is a Demon lord. He is known as the "Demon Prince of Madness", not because he claimed sovereignty over insanity, but primarily for his current state of mind.

Adimarchus made his debut in Dungeon #116 (November 2004) in the adventure Asylum, which is the finale of the Shackled City adventure path. Adimarchus' ultimate fate (whether he lives or dies) depends on what happened in the adventure.[7] Adimarchus received further details in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2]

Adimarchus has two forms. The first may be what he looked like when he was a Celestial, that of a pale purple-skinned hairless humanoid with razor sharp metallic wings. Golden tattoo-like patterns shift across his chest. His other form is that of a lithe humanoid with ash-black skin and four tentacles protruding from his back that end in lamprey-like maws. Adimarchus can switch between these two forms at will. To destroy Adimarchus is like fighting two separate creatures; killing just one form but not the other does not slay him. Damage sustained in one form is not carried over to the other. As a result of his celestial origins, any spells or spell-like abilities with the good descriptor treats Adimarchus as if his alignment were good.

Adimarchus makes his home on Occipitus, the 507th layer of the Abyss, which was once part of Celestia. Even though the layer is technically abandoned with the imprisonment of Adimarchus, no petty demon lords or similar beings have stepped in take over. Because Occipitus itself incorporated part of Celestia, most demons avoid the layer. Occipitus resembles a great basin surrounded by steep mountains. The center of the basin is a mountain that resembles a half-buried skull. The grounds of Occipitus have a strange organic look and feel, resembling warm, damp, grayish-red flesh. In fact, the ground cannot be dug into, it has to be cut open in chunks. There are parts of Occipitus that remain a bastion of good because of its former presence on Celestia.

Adimarchus was a fallen celestial. It is not known how or why he fell from grace, but what is known is that he eventually led an army of demons to invade the upper plane of Celestia. The angels of Celestia repelled the invasion by casting part of Celestia (along with Adimarchus and the invading demonic horde) into the Abyss, specifically, the 507th layer known as Occipitus.

Despite his defeat, Adimarchus incorporated the wreckage of Celestia into the layer, and in doing so he became the ruler of Occipitus, becoming a demon lord in the process. Adimarchus went on to build an empire in the Abyss, eventually coming into conflict with Graz'zt. Shortly afterwards, Adimarchus disappeared.

It turned out that an aasimar paladin named Athux went to Occipitus on a quest to redeem Adimarchus's soul. Athux fought his way through the layer and into the throne room of the fallen celestial/ demon prince. The two fought practically to a standstill until Adimarchus gained the upper hand and sundered Athux's weapon. Adimarchus would have killed Athux but in a rare moment of compassion sparked by his celestial nature could not bear to do it. Instead, Adimarchus kept Athux prisoner and attempted to seduce him to the side of Evil. Athux, on the other hand, fueled in Adimarchus a hatred against demonkind. A friendship actually bloomed between the two former arch-foes, thus causing some of Adimarchus's minions to turn against him.

When Adimarchus planned an assault on Graz'zt, Graz'zt himself conspired with Adimarchus's traitorous lieutenants. In the ensuing battle between the two hordes, Graz'zt captured Athux and imprisoned him in Carceri. Adimarchus abandoned his layer and his armies and went to Carceri to free Athux and, perhaps, finally seek redemption. He found Athux, stricken with insanity in an asylum called Skullrot, run by one of Graz'zt's minions, a lich-fiend named Dark Myrakul. Dark Myrakul offered Athux's freedom if Adimarchus himself would take his place in the asylum. Adimarchus readily agreed, and when Athux was freed, the truth came out.

Athux was pretending to be insane. In fact, he was pretending to be an aasimar paladin. Athux turned out to be a son of Graz'zt who had been manipulating Adimarchus from the very beginning. When Adimarchus realized the truth, his mind snapped. Adimarchus has been imprisoned in Skullrot ever since, and as the years went by, his hatred and insanity swelled until he transformed into two beings; one angelic, and one demonic.

Ahazu[edit]

Ahazu
Game background
Title(s) The Seizer
Home plane Abyss
Power level Vestige (former demon lord)
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio The Night, Abduction
Design details

Ahazu the Seizer is a demon lord that now functions as a vestige as a result of his self-imposed imprisonment in the Abyssal layer known as the Wells of Darkness.

Creative origins[edit]

His name and title of "the Seizer" is based on a demon in Semitic mythology. The mythological Ahazu is also associated with disease while the Dungeons & Dragons Ahazu downplayed this aspect. In Gary Gygax's Gord novel Come Endless Darkness, there was a character by the name of Talonclasp who was an ahazu-demon. He is described as a square-bodied creature with long lanky arms and huge talons.

Publication history[edit]

Ahazu was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[1]

Ahazu received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2] Ahazu played a role in the 2007 Savage Tide adventure path in Dungeon magazine #143 in the adventure "Tides of Dread",[8] and #148 in the adventure "Wells of Darkness".[9]

Description[edit]

Ahazu appears as a dark-skinned naked humanoid with bat-like wings, long thin arms, and an elongated head dominated with a mouth filled with needle-sharp teeth. Ahaz has long sharp talons and his legs appears to trail away into nothingness.

History[edit]

The demon lord Ahazu earned his title as The Seizer for his portfolios of the night and of abduction. Ages past, Ahazu stumbled upon the Abyssal layer that would become the Wells of Darkness. This layer apparently lies in an infinite void called Shattered Night. The layer itself is surrounded by a planar "membrane" that separates it from the void itself. Ahazu discovered that by digging shafts into the terrain of the layer itself, he can reach thin spots in the membrane which would act as "windows" to Shattered Night. After many years of digging (creating hundreds, if not thousands of shafts, or wells, as they eventually became), Ahazu finally found a planar tear that enable him to actually step into the void, which he did, never to return.

Ahazu's cult and followers eventually discovered that their patron can be contacted by pact magic and they built a fortress, called the Overlook, over the planar tear that Ahazu have stepped in. Ahazu demanded that his cult abduct other beings, dead or alive, and bring them to the layer in order to join him in the void of Shattered Night. His cult would place these beings near one of the windows/wells that Ahazu himself have dug, and Ahazu himself, as befits his title, would seize the creature through the well and into Shattered Night.

The cult soon made a fatal error in trying to capture and imprison Orcus, the Prince of the Undead. They launched an assault on his layer of Thanatos and was soundly defeated. In retaliation, Orcus' hordes swept the Wells of Darkness, destroyed Ahazu's surviving cult, and left the fortress of Overlook in ruins.

Years later, a coven of varrangoins discovered the ruins, Ahazu, and the nature of the layer itself. These canny new arrivals pledged their service to Ahazu, but instead of abducting prospective prisoners on their own, they offered to use the Wells of Darkness to imprison the enemies and undesirables of others in exchange for wealth, power and prestige.

Ahazu himself can free a prisoner (although he cannot free himself) through one of the wells, or create a binding pact with other beings that whisks a creature into Shattered Night based on certain conditions. Ahazu can also absorb the life essences of those who entered Shattered Night, hence lies his primary motive for his self-imposed imprisonment. Given enough life essences, Ahazu can emerge from the void as a true deity.

Ahrimanes[edit]

Ahrimanes
Game background
Title(s) Chief of the Cacodaemons
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Exiles, wanderers
Superior None
Design details

Ahrimanes, known as the Chief of the Cacodaemons, is the demon lord of exiles and wanderers, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Ahrimanes is named after Ahriman, the source of evil in the Zoroastrian faith. Ahrimanes dwells on the 452nd layer of the Abyss, known as Ahriman-abad.

Publication history[edit]

Ahrimanes was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[1]

Ahrimanes received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2]

Ahrimanes received further description in the fourth edition book Demonomicon (2010).[3]

Apocrypha[edit]

In The Book of Fiends (2003), Ahrimanes is a former planetar who fell from the Upper Planes before the creation of the mortal world. He considered the gods to be childish and capricious, and fomented rebellion against them. The gods banished Ahrimanes and his followers, using their servants, the still-angelic Baalzebul, Iblis, and Sariel, as instruments of their will. All three celestial beings would later follow Ahrimanes into exile after rebellions of their own.

Now an exile, Ahrimanes wandered the still-unformed cosmos for a thousand years until the creation of mortals and the subsequent rebellion of those who had once enforced the gods decrees (including Asmodeus, who Ahrimanes considered to be his heir). After laughing at the misfortune of his erstwhile tormentors, he finally ended his wanderings and established a realm of his own from which he does his best to corrupt mortals to send their souls on their own wanderings into the depths of the Lower Planes.

In this book, Ahrimanes is described as a naked nine-foot-tall humanoid with inky blue skin. His face is a knot of writhing larvae from which spews a swarm of flies.[10]

Aldinach[edit]

Aldinach
Game background
Title(s) Lady of Change
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Transformation
Design details

Aldinach, Lady of Change, is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Aldinach was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[1]

Aldinach received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2]

Description[edit]

Aldinach is a reclusive demon princess who delights in the perversion of the pure and innocent. She appears as a lithe humanoid woman with her face covered by an alabaster mask, and with polished mahogany skin and long fingers that end in needles. She uses these needles to inject putrid sap into her victims.[2]

Realm[edit]

Aldinach lives on the layer of Pazunia, from the fortress of Aldinach's Egg by the edge of the Grand Abyss. This towering structure is packed with grim laboratories, operating theaters, and hideous audience chambers draped in the skins of failed experiments. Guests who stay too long are fed to the Brethren, a score of chaos beasts who dwell in the Egg's uppermost Forbidden Chambers.[2]

Aldinach is one of several demon lords who claims a stretch of the Grand Abyss.[2]

Worshipers[edit]

Aldinach commands a growing cult on several Material Plane worlds that is concerned with the abduction of righteous holy figures or sacred beasts such as ki-rins or lammasus, which are taken to Aldinach's Egg to endure vile experiments which corrupt their nature and enslave them to Aldinach's whims. Those strong enough to survive Pazunia defend the territory within a mile of Aldinach's Egg.[2]

Other publishers[edit]

Aldinach appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 2: Lords of Chaos (2010), on page 10.[5]

Alrunes[edit]

Alrunes, known as The Soothing Spirit, covers the domains of Protection, sisterhood, and controls the 260th layer: Green Abyss, and was featured in Monster Manual 2. Alrunes is female.[citation needed]

Alvarez[edit]

Alvarez
Game background
Title(s) The Purging Duke, Inquisitor of the Tanar'ri (self-proclaimed)
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Inquisition, torture
Design details

Alvarez, known as the Purging Duke, is the demon lord of Torture and Inquisition, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Alvarez was first mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[11] Alvarez received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[12]

Description[edit]

Alvarez is a master of torture who searches the ranks of the tanar'ri incessantly for signs of the taint of Law. As a mere petitioner, he outwitted the nalfeshnee of Woe who judged him, and served as a maggot-loving chasme and then a powerful glabrezu assassin (for 3,000 years) before gaining a demonic form closely resembling his living one: a human man with oily blue-black hair. His clothing is immaculate, but a light of insanity burns in his eyes.

Relationships[edit]

Alvarez is famous for the brutalities he inflicts upon his own troops. Even demons fear his inventive torments.

Realm[edit]

Alvarez dwells on the 57th layer of the Abyss, known as Torturous Truth.

Alzrius[edit]

Alzrius
Game background
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Design details

Alzrius is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game. Alzrius is the Lord of the Flowing Flame, and rules layer 601 of the Abyss, Conflagratum. His physical form is actually a large pillar of flame, and when his armies go on a campaign, the leader of the armies carries a piece of Alzrius's body as a torch. He had a magic item, the flame amulet of Alzrius, in Polyhedron #135 (written by Erik Mona). Also, while not explicitly stated to be his, one of the armors from the article "Armor of the Abyssal Lords" (Dragon #270) is likely his, as it has a flame theme, and the article says no one knows which lord that armor is attributed to.

Alzrius was first mentioned in Hellbound: The Blood War (1996).[13] Alzrius received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[12]

Anarazel[edit]

Anzazel, the Daring Darkness who concerns himself with adventurers dwells on the 79 level, the Emessu Tunnels. He is listed in Monster Manual 2.

Ansitif[edit]

Ansitif
Game background
Title(s) The Befouler
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Corruption of religious sites and relics
Design details

Ansitif the Befouler is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.Ansitif is a demon lord who favored corrupting places of worship.[2] Ansitif is now a vestige who can be called by binders.[14] Ansitif and six tanar'ri allies joined long ago to hunt down the Malgoth, although after their victory they assassinated or imprisoned each other one by one.[2] Ansitif is imprisoned in the Wells of Darkness. He is the former ruler of layer 21, The Sixth Pyre.[2]

Ansitif was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[15] Ansitif received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2] Ansitif was further described in Dragon #357 (2007), in the article "Gazing Into the Abyss."[14]

Ardat[edit]

Ardat
Game background
Title(s) The Unavowed
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Secret or failing marriages, harpies
Design details

Ardat the Unavowed is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Ardat was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[16]

Ardat was mentioned briefly in Baphomet's entry in "The Demonimicon of Iggwilv" series in Dragon #341 (2006).[17] Ardat received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[18] Ardat received a full description in the "Demonomicon of Iggwilv: Apocrypha" edition in Dragon #359 (2007).[19]

Description[edit]

Ardat appears as a 12-foot tall, three-headed harpy, with raven-black wings and feathers.[19]

Relationships[edit]

Baphomet sought Ardat when he wanted to enlist the aid of a cabal of half-fiend harpies known as the Soul Sirens; when he betrayed them, Ardat became one of his enemies.[17]

Realm[edit]

Ardat is a nomadic demon lord, and has no realm of her own, drifting from realm to realm in search of victims.[19]

Areex[edit]

Areex
Game background
Title(s) The Forgotten Prince
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Design details

Areex the Forgotten Prince is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Areex was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[20]

Areex received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2]

Description[edit]

Areex is a demon lord who had been forgotten for centuries until a group of gibberlings in the city of Sigil began repeating a message about Areex journeying "beyond the stars" to make a pact.[2]

Relationships[edit]

According to the gibberlings' tale, Areex was to enter into a pact with a being called Bolothamogg after paying the price of the deal.[2]

Realm[edit]

Areex is imprisoned in the Wells of Darkness, and to date no efforts to revive him have met with success.[2]

Arlgolcheir[edit]

Arlgolcheir
Game background
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Design details

Arlgolcheir is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Arlgolcheir was first mentioned in an article by Ed Greenwood in Dragon #116 (December 1986).[21]

He was further developed by Eric L. Boyd in Dungeon #148 (July 2007) in the adventure "Wells of Darkness".[22]

Description[edit]

Arlgolcheir was said to have been desroyed by Laeral, with the aid of Khelben "Blackstaff" Arunsun and the mage Alduth of Neverwinter.[21] He later appeared as one of the powerful beings trapped in one of the Wells of Darkness.[22]

Arzial[edit]

Arzial
Game background
Title(s) The Blooded Baron
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Portfolio Subterfuge
Superior None
Design details

Arzial, known as the Blooded Baron, is a minor demon lord of Subterfuge, master of the Barony of Vulderpayne in the Abyss, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Arzial was first mentioned in the adventure "The Ruins of Nol-Daer" in Dungeon #13 (September/October 1988).[23]

Arzial received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[12] Arzial was mentioned briefly in Graz'zt's entry in "The Demonimicon of Iggwilv" series in Dragon #360 (2007).[24]

Description[edit]

Arzial is a cambion, born of the demon prince Graz'zt and a presumably human woman. The least accomplished of Graz'zt's many children, Arzial still has a vital role in Graz'zt's schemes.

Relationships[edit]

Arzial's father is Graz'zt, making him the half-brother of Athux, Belyara, Iuz, Rule-of-Three, and Thraxxia and the grandson of Pale Night. He has a close relationship with a female wizard known as Demara the Enchantress, whose half-fiendish son MacDaer Arzial fostered for fifty years, teaching him magic and the ways of the Abyss. The exact relationship between Demara, Arzial, and MacDaer is unclear; Arzial could be MacDaer's father, brother, or no true relation at all.

Realm[edit]

Vulderpayne is remote, but still important to Graz'zt. It is located in Pazunia, the Plain of Infinite Portals, a harsh realm of iron fortresses and deep pits that act as portals leading to the lower planes of the Abyss. Fiendish Codex I actually says that Arzial's barony is within Graz'zt's realm of Azzagrat,[2] while the Demonomicon of Iggwilv article by James Jacobs placed it in Pazunia.[24] Perhaps Vulderpayne contains a portal to Azzagrat, which would explain Graz'zt's desire to keep it under his control.

Aseroth[edit]

Aseroth
Game background
Title(s) The Winter Warlock
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Cold, ice, corruption, magic
Design details

Aseroth the Winter Warlock is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Aseroth was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[25]

Aseroth received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[26]

Aseroth received further description in the fourth edition book Demonomicon (2010).[3]

Description[edit]

Aseroth is a demon lord who is said to have once been an elemental prince of evil.[3]

Realm[edit]

Aseroth rules Soulfreeze from the icy domain known as the Crystal Caverns, a deep fissure cleft from ice sheet.[3]

Soulfreeze is thought to have a two-way portal to the Paraelemental Plane of Ice; the key to activate the portal is a mortal soul, which is destroyed in the process.[27]

Asima[edit]

Asima
Game background
Title(s) The Unanticipated
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Ill surprises
Design details

Asima the Unanticipated is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Asima was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[28]

Asima received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2]

Asima received further description in the fourth edition book Demonomicon (2010).[3]

Description[edit]

Asima was an obyrith demon lord, a faceless entity who is long dead.[2]

Asima is said to have betrayed the obyriths in ages past.[3]

Relationships[edit]

Asima is said to have ordered the klurichir known as the Guardian of the Gates to hold the Grand Abyss in ancient days, and the demon still carries this out.[2]

Realm[edit]

Asima is thought to have played a part the creation of the Grand Abyss.[2]

Asima's undecaying remains are held in the burial mound known as the Tumulus of Abhorrence, which is defended by the Guardian of the Gates.[3]

Astaroth[edit]

Astaroth
Game background
Title(s) (Former) Treasurer of Hell, Diabolus
Power level Vestige
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, Astaroth was a demon lord who is now a vestige. He was known by the title of Diabolus for his ability to infiltrate the ranks of the devils, and was worshiped by mortals for his prophetic abilities.

Creative origins[edit]

Astaroth, at least name-wise, is based on the demon of the same name in demonology.[citation needed]

Publication history[edit]

Astaroth was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[29]

Astaroth is mentioned as having been killed and replaced in the second edition Forgotten Realms book, Powers & Pantheons (1997).[30]

Astaroth received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2] Astaroth was further described in Dragon #357 (2007), in the article "Gazing Into the Abyss."[14] Astaroth played a role in the 2007 Savage Tide adventure path in Dungeon magazine #148 in the adventure "Wells of Darkness".[9]

Description[edit]

Astaroth, in life, appears as a handsome human with both draconic and feathered wings. As a vestige, when called by binders, he manifests his old form but his body is slowly consumed by hellfire.

History[edit]

A once powerful demon prince, Astaroth gained the title of Diabolus for his ability to infiltrate the legions of Baator, becoming one of its foremost nobles as the Treasurer of Hell. When the archdevil Gargoth exposed him, Astaroth fled back to the Abyss to escape Asmodeus's wrath. To prepare the inevitable retaliation from the Lords of the Nine, Astaroth used his prophetic powers to gain mortal followers on the Prime Material Plane in order to gain true divinity. He even struck a bargain with Ahazu to have his body imprisoned in the Wells of Darkness in the event of his death so he could be resurrected. It is said Astaroth did achieve true divinity, but that still was not enough to protect him when Gargoth, under Asmodeus' command, tracked him down and destroyed him. It is said that Gargauth went on to claim Astaroth's divinity, and even traveled under his name as well.

Astaroth's body is currently located in The Wells of Darkness. However, his promised resurrection has been stalled by the hellfire that Gargauth ignited in him; even as the Abyss itself works to regenerate his body, the hellfire keeps consuming it.

As a vestige, Astaroth grants his summoner a hatred toward devils, divination abilities, and to burn with the flames of the Abyss.

Other Astaroths[edit]

Other than Gargauth, who uses his name, there is another being, who is also a vestige, who goes by the name of Astaroth. This Astaroth was a fallen celestial.

Green Ronin's Armies of the Abyss has its own non-canonic take on Astaroth the demon prince. He appears as a beautiful angelic human with white feathered wings, golden hair, and rides a dragon and has a viper wrapped around one arm. He is said to rule a layer of the Abyss called the Terminal Archives, which is an infinite library. It is said that the coming of end of the multiverse is signaled by Astaroth burning every book from his library.

Azael[edit]

Azael
Game background
Title(s) The Ensnared
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Rebellion, war
Design details

Azael the Ensnared is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Azael was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[31]

Azael received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2]

Description[edit]

Azael was once a dour fallen angel hero of the Upheaval. He had been chained to an enormous plaza in ancient days, and despite his bondage he ruled a cult that extended deep into the Material Plane. He ruled this layer of the Abyss, which was a sprawling desert of shifting dunes and toppled cities, until he was slain, leaving only an oily black stain.[2]

Relationships[edit]

Azael was slain by Ma Yuan, although his influence lingers still. Part of this layer known as Azael's Waste retains its desert form, refusing to give way to Yeenoghu's will.[2]

Realm[edit]

Azael took over the Abyssal layer Bechard once ruled, calling it the Savage Searing. When Azael was killed, Yeenoghu took over the layer.[2]

Azazel[edit]

Azazel
Game background
Home plane Nine Hells
Power level Duke of Hell
Alignment Lawful Evil
Design details

Azazel is an outcast Duke of Hell, one of the Rabble of Devilkin, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Azazel first appears in Ed Greenwood's article "The Nine Hells Revisited" in Dragon #91 (November 1984).[32]

Azazel was briefly detailed in Fiendish Codex II: Tyrants of the Nine Hells (2006).[33]

Description[edit]

Azazel "the Serpent," is extremely conceited and scornful. Cast out of two successive dukedoms for his unbearable behaviour, Azazel constantly plots to regain his former position. He always wear gaudy jewelry and regal clothing. Azazel is a scaly-skinned humanoid with a serpent's head and large scaled wings.

Relationships[edit]

Azazel is one of the Rabble of Devilkin. He only considers Asmodeus, Baalzebul, Mephistopheles, and Adramalech his equals.

Azuvidexus[edit]

Azuvidexus (d) the Ravenous Maw concerned with Primeval beasts and scaled nightmares controls the domain of N'gharl (formerly layer #230). Originally covered by the Wizards of the Coast website: The Crawling Jungle and Dragon #357 "Demonomicon of Iggwilv", page 29. The current Azuvidexus is an awakened tyrannosaur who had abosrbed the original's evil and intellect.

Baltazo[edit]

Baltazo
Game background
Title(s) The Seeping Sovereign
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Diplomacy, strategy
Design details

Baltazo the Seeping Sovereign is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Baltazo was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[34]

Baltazo received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2]

Description[edit]

Baltazo is a minor demon lord, a retired general noted for several Blood War victories. He appears as an extremely corpulent human male with an elongated face and deep green skin that constantly fizzles and pops, spilling sickly fluids upon his poorly-fitting uniform with dozens of medals and ribbons.[2]

Relationships[edit]

The ambitious Baltazo was one of several opportunistic demon lords who flocked to Hollow's Heart, hoping to make it their own, while Fraz-Urb'luu was imprisoned on the Material Plane. Baltazo knew he could not hope to command Hollow's Heart, but saw opportunity in the growing conflict. Instead of staking his own claim, he instead conquered one of the iron fortresses of Pazunia, commanding the nearby gateway to Hollow's Heart to allow him to subtly influence the affairs of the layer, and afford him prestige elsewhere in the Abyss. Fraz-Urb'luu wiped out most of the rival demon lords fighting over his layer when he returned, but saw value in Baltazo's defense of the Pazunia gate and the two demons came to an agreement. Baltazo is therefore a sponsored vassal of Fraz-Urb'luu, and sometimes acts as his diplomat or interlocutor.[2]

Realm[edit]

Baltazo rules the iron fortress known as Shullen-Gat on Pazunia, which is on the precipie of the pit leading to Fraz-Urb'luu's lair. From there, he stands sentinel over the pit to Hollow's Heart.[2]

Baphomet[edit]

Baphomet
Baphomet.JPG
Game background
Title(s) Prince of Beasts, Demon Lord of Minotaurs, the Trampler, the Horned King
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Portfolio Minotaurs, Beasts, Vengeance
Superior None
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game, Baphomet (/ˈbæfɵmɛt/ BAF-ə-met)[35] is a demon lord who rules a layer of the Abyss called the Endless Maze. He is the Prince of Beasts and the Demon Lord of Minotaurs.

Publication history[edit]

Baphomet first appears in module The Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth (1982),[36] and then appears in the first edition Monster Manual II (1983),[37] under the demon entry. Baphomet makes another appearance in the module The Throne of Bloodstone (1988).[38] Baphomet was detailed as a deity in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about his priesthood.[39] Baphomet's role among the giant deities of the Forgotten Realms campaign setting is described in detail in Giantcraft (1995).[40] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[41] Baphomet appeared, again as a demon lord, in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[42] Baphomet is fully detailed in Dragon, in issue #341 (March 2006) in the "Demonomicon of Iggwilv" feature.[43] Baphomet was featured in the Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[44] Baphomet is one of the few demon lords mentioned in the 4th edition Monster Manual (2008).[45]

His game-statistics, and brief biography, can be found in The Manual of the Planes.

Baphomet is fully detailed in the online version of Dragon, in issue #369 (November 2008) in the "Demonomicon of Iggwilv" feature.[46]

Description[edit]

Baphomet has the appearance of a 12' tall humanoid with a bull's head, a bovine tail, and broad, stubby hands and feet. His body is covered with coarse black hair. His horns curve downward and outward. He wields a giant bardiche. Baphomet can spit out gouts of unholy water.

Relationships[edit]

Baphomet hates Yeenoghu, and the two are bitter enemies. The two have been warring against each other for as long as they themselves could remember, and both have forgotten the origin of their feud. Baphomet's other enemies include the Demon Queen of Harpies Ardat.

Baphomet has an unknown relationship with Pale Night, who shares his layer.

Realm[edit]

Baphomet's realm of the Endless Maze (in Gary Gygax's Gord novels, Baphomet's realm is called Shubgottia) is the 600th layer of the Abyss, supposedly infinite in size. Here, Baphomet dwells in his palace, the Lyktion, and spend his time creating various new demonic breeds in his infamous Tower of Science. Some of his more successful creations are the goristroi, the bulezaus, the ghours, and more recently, the feral ankashars.

Dogma[edit]

Baphomet is the embodiment of savagery, an insidious force that worms its way into the heart of his followers to deceive them into embracing brutality.

Baphomet has a multitude of minotaurs, ogres, and giant followers and minions. He is also served by ghour demons, a race of demons resembling burly, hairless minotaurs which command troops of these mortal minions. He seeks to use them to further his schemes, notably to gain the upper hand in his battles against Yeenoghu. A multitude of other twisted creatures revere Baphomet as well, some becoming his thralls, and if they pleased their bestial patron, they would be granted rulership of a portion of the Endless Maze. Those who displease Baphomet are eaten.

History[edit]

It is suggested that Baphomet started his existence as a mortal creature; although it is unclear whether he was a beast that lived as a man or a man who lived as a beast. It is also suggested that he was cursed by the gods for daring to treat them like cattle, and thus banished to the Abyss. In any case, Baphomet reveled in his power, seeing the curse more as a blessing.

Almost a thousand years ago, Yeenoghu and Baphomet orchestrated an invasion of Western Oerik, opening vast portals in the forest of Ravilla. Armies of demons, gnolls, and minotaurs poured into the forests, burning them and slaughtering wood elves by the thousands. An army of elves, allied with Bahamut and his dragons, managed to defeat the demonic alliance after a long war. The portals were sealed shut and cities were built to guard them. Yeenoghu and Baphomet became enemies, each blaming the other for their defeat.

In the 4th edition setting, Baphomet was originally a primordial (an elemental god) who was corrupted by the Abyss eons ago.

Cult of Baphomet[edit]

According to Monster Mythology, Baphomet is increasingly attracting a following amongst minotaurs. He seeks to use them to further his schemes, notably to gain the upper hand in his battles against Yeenoghu.

Minions and related creatures[edit]

Baphomet has a multitude of minotaur, ogre and giant followers and minions. He is also served by ghour demons, a race of demons resembling burly, hairless minotaurs which command troops of these mortal minions.

Other publishers[edit]

Baphomet appeared under the "demon" heading in the Tome of Horrors (2002) from Necromancer Games.[47]

Baphomet appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 2: Lords of Chaos (2010), on page 12.[48]

Barbu[edit]

Barbu (f),The Unwelcome, is concerned with discord and ruined peace and is listed in Monster Manual 2.

Bayemon[edit]

Bayemon, Of the Unhealing Wound is concerned with the afflicted is listed in Monster Manual 2. Bayemon is said to have escaped from the Wells of Darkness. According to the "Demonomicon", Kostchtchie is in possession of Bayemon's still living severed head in his glacial fortress.

Bechard[edit]

Bechard
Game background
Title(s) The Rotting Husk
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Decomposition, obsolescence
Design details

Bechard the Rotting Husk is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Bechard was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[49]

Bechard received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2]

Description[edit]

Bechard was once the obyrith demon lord of tempests, until treachery at the hands of the tanar'ri severed his connection to his Abyssal layer and drained the life from his pallid husk. He now resembles an enormous knotty beached whale, constantly baking in the lyer's scorching sun, except for when the coastal outcropping on which he rests is battered with hurricanes and acid rain.[2]

Relationships[edit]

Bechard allows Yeenoghu to communicate telepathically with him on his yearly circuit of the layer, sharing ancient tales of the history of demons and the Abyss.[2]

Realm[edit]

Bechard was once the ruler of the Abyssal layer that Yeenoghu now rules. He has been slowly dying on his layer for millennia, and now lies on Bechard's Landing, incapable of movement.[2]

Cabiri[edit]

Cabiri
Game background
Title(s) The Watching Master
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Observation
Design details

Cabiri the Watching Master is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Cabiri was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[50]

Cabiri received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2] Cabiri was further described in Dragon #357 (2007), in the article "Gazing Into the Abyss."[14]

Description[edit]

Cabiri is an obyrith demon lord, a many-eyed tyrant and one of the oldest obyriths in existence.[2]

Cabiri is now a vestige who can be called by binders.[14]

Relationships[edit]

Cabiri is said to have stood up to the Queen of Chaos and refused her call to war against the Wind Dukes of Aaqa.[2]

Realm[edit]

Cabiri is imprisoned in the Wells of Darkness.[2]

Charun[edit]

Charun, The Hammerer, concerned with Massacres is listed in MM2.

Chernovog[edit]

Chernovog, The Green God, concerned with Evil Druids, Vengeful Nature, Warlocks, evil fey The Verdant Chasm; is on an unknown layer. Covered in Expedition to Castle Ravenloft.

Codricuhn[edit]

Codricuhn, The Blood Storm or Prince of the Eight Seas, concerned with Destruction, storms Coagulus. He wanders the Abyss. He was covered in Dungeon #168.

Cyndshyra[edit]

Cyndshyra (d), Of the Seven Torments was covered in Dragon #357, page 67. Allied with Ansitif to destroy the Malgoth.

Dagon[edit]

Dagon
Game background
Title(s) Prince of the Darkened Depths
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Domains Chaos, Entropy, Evil, Water[51]
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, Dagon is an obyrith demon lord, also called Prince of the Depths. His realm is the 89th layer of the Abyss, and is known as Shadowsea. As one of the oldest demon lords in existence, Dagon is said to possess vast and forbidden knowledge.

Publishing history[edit]

Dagon is first mentioned in the first edition Advanced Dungeons & Dragons sourcebook Monster Manual II, where it is said in passing that he rules a liquid layer dominated by marine dretch, hezrou, kraken, and horrible fish-monsters.[52]

Dagon is fully described years later, in the game's third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss.[53] Dagon's realm is described on Wizards of the Coast's website.[54]

Dagon appeared in the fourth edition Monster Manual 2 (2009). He is described as Demogorgon's close ally.[55] The 4th edition Demonomicon (2010) confirms his obyrith origins.[56]

Description[edit]

Dagon appears as a colossal-sized eel with the leering fanged face of a deep-underwater fish. Numerous suckered tentacles cover his body, two of which end in finger-like digits tipped with long sharp talons. Dagon's symbol is six spiraling tentacles arranged around a fanged mouth, and his favored weapon is the harpoon.[51]

Relationships[edit]

Dagon and Demogorgon have an alliance of sorts, and it is rumored that Demogorgon gained his power and influence from the unspeakable knowledge he has gleaned from the Lord of the Depths.

Other than his alliance with Demogorgon, Dagon has few allies, and fewer enemies, for most other demon lords prefer to leave Dagon alone in his deep realm; those who do not are now dead. Despite being an isolationist, many demons, lords or otherwise, pay tribute to Dagon in the hopes of gaining information about the Abyss from him, as he is also revered throughout the Abyss as a great sage and oracle. The demon lord Lascer has attempted to ally himself with Dagon at the urging of his master, Obox-ob.

Though Dagon has followers among the kuo-toa, the feelings of their patron goddess, Blibdoolpoolp, are unknown on this matter.

Realm[edit]

Dagon's realm, known as Shadowsea, is the 89th layer of the Abyss. Shadowsea is an underwater realm with a seabed dotted with ruined cities, but without a surface. At certain points, if one ascends or swims upward, he will find himself surfacing on the 88th layer, which is the Gaping Maw of Demogorgon.

Worshippers[edit]

Dagon is served by aquatic demons, especially wastriliths and the obyrith uzollrus. He is worshipped by aquatic races such as kraken, chuul, sea hags, water nagas, and kuo-toa.

History[edit]

Dagon is one of the few obyrith lords that are still in power in the Abyss, mainly from his isolationist nature and his sheer power. The hostile nature of his realm also protects him from any invasion attempts by rivals. When the Queen of Chaos tried to rally the obyriths in the war against Law, Dagon was one of those who refused her call, and one of the few who escaped her resultant wrath, mostly because the Queen feared his power. After the fall of the obyriths, Dagon remained as he always was, safe and secure in his deep realm.

4th edition[edit]

According to the 4th edition Monster Manual 2, Dagon was the first creature in the Abyss. When the first primordials entered and began conquering realms, they found Dagon already there deep within the dark seas. This has led to speculation that Tharizdun did not actually create the Abyss, but simply opened the way in; whether this is true or not, Dagon alone knows and he has never revealed it.

The Demonomicon goes into more detail: after Tharizdun plunged the shard of evil into the Elemental Chaos and created the Abyss, the primordials who entered felt the presence of the shard and went in search of it. Demogorgon found it first and waded into the waters after it, but Dagon rose from the depths unexpectedly and challenged him. The two engaged in a ferocious battle while the obyrith Obox-ob took advantage of the distraction to claim it for himself. Dagon and Demogorgon became allies at some unknown point later.

The outcast Dagon[edit]

The demon lord Dagon should not be confused with the exiled devil of the same name, who dwells on Avernus, first layer of Baator. Originally known as Jaqon, Asmodeus forcibly changed Jaqon's name to Dagon to thwart attempts to summon the offender. The original, in turn, took this as a grave insult.[57]

Other publishers[edit]

Dagon appeared under the "demon" heading in the Tome of Horrors (2002) from Necromancer Games.[58]

Dagon appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 2: Lords of Chaos (2010), on page 14.[59]

Demogorgon[edit]

Demogorgon
Game background
Title(s) Prince of Demons, Lord of All That Swims in Darkness
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Superior None
Design details

Demogorgon is a powerful demon prince. He is known as the Prince of Demons, a self-proclaimed title he holds by virtue of his power and influence; which in turn, is a title acknowledged by both mortals and his fellow demons. Demogorgon was also named as one of the greatest villains in D&D history by the final issue of Dragon.[60]

Dwiergus[edit]

Dwiergus
Game background
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Design details

Dwiergus is a demon lord, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Dwiergus was first mentioned in the article "Demonomicon of Iggwilv: Baphomet" in Dragon #341 (March 2006), by James Jacobs.[61] Dwiergus received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[62] Dwiergus received a full description in the "Demonomicon of Iggwilv: Apocrypha" edition in Dragon #359 (2007).[19]

Description[edit]

Said to be even more ancient than Pale Night, Dwiergus, the Chrysalis Prince, has control over the shaping of demonic races.

Relationships[edit]

Pale Night introduced Baphomet to Dwiergus, who seems to have aided him in learning to create new demon breeds of his own.

Realm[edit]

His layer of the Abyss, Fleshforges, is catalogued as the 558th.

Eblis[edit]

Eblis, Of the Unbended Knee, concerned with Refusal to surrender is on the 1st layer: Pazunia. Covered in the Monster Manual 2. Not to be confused with the Eblis creatures.

Ebulon[edit]

Ebulon is a former general of Graz'zt. He is imprisoned on layer 73: Wells of Darkness and is listed in the Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss.

Eldanoth[edit]

Eldanoth
Game background
Title(s) The Bloodless Scion
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Crime
Superior None (formerly Orcus)
Design details

Eldanoth, known as the Bloodless Scion, is the demon lord of Crime, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Eldanoth was first mentioned in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[63]

Eldanoth received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[12]

Description[edit]

Eldanoth looks like a smiling tiefling with snakes for fingers. He often leaves his body in his copper fortress while he astral projects himself into the Prime Material Plane, where he recruits new followers.

Relationships[edit]

A former servant of Orcus, Eldanoth left after his patron's death at the hands of Kiaransalee and claimed an abandoned Abyssal layer as his own. He seeks to become a power of crime and hatred. He has become something of a folk hero in Orcus's realm of Thanatos, where his agents work to sabotage Orcus's plans.

Realm[edit]

Eldanoth's realm, the Arch of Eternity, is listed as the 359th layer of the Abyss. It is a blasted plain where a copper fortress has risen from a rent in the earth. Outside, snakes and manes gather to honor the new lord.

Worshipers[edit]

Eldanoth is worshiped by criminals.

Rituals[edit]

Eldanoth's worship includes the ritual sacrifice of criminals, whose spirits are said to feed Eldanoth's strength.

Eltab[edit]

Eltab
Game background
Title(s) Lord of the Hidden Layer
Home plane Abyss
Power level demon lord
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, Eltab is a demon lord. Eltab is known as the Lord of the Hidden Layer. He is particularly active in the game’s Forgotten Realms campaign setting.

Publication history[edit]

Eltab was first mentioned in Dreams of the Red Wizards.[64]

Eltab debuted in the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons second edition supplement Spellbound.[65]

Eltab made his third edition debut in Champions of Ruin,[66] and is also mentioned in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss.[67]

Description[edit]

Eltab appears as a 15-foot tall humanoid with the head of a canine-like creature. His head sports numerous antlers and horns and his body is covered with bony dark red plates. He has slitted yellow glowing eyes.

Realm[edit]

Eltab rules the 248th layer of the Abyss known asThe Hidden Layer. It is a vast wasteland of boulders and fissures constantly beset with intensive electrical storms, making it inimical to most life except for demons and deadly plant life such as viper trees, ironmaws, and bloodthorns. In the past thousand years or so, because of Eltab’s absence, the Hidden Layer has been fragmented in ever-changing fiefdoms as Eltab’s former lieutenants, including the balor Ndulu, fight over the vacated realm.

Thanks to the bindings cast upon the Narfelli demon-binders on Eltab when they summoned him, they also somehow linked fragments of the Hidden Layer into Faerun as well. So pieces of the layer, known as demoncysts, are lying scattered beneath the ground all over the northeast Faerun.

Demoncysts are typically 100-feet or more in diameter. The environment of the cyst do not interact with the surrounding terrestrial environment (and vice versa), thus each cyst resemble a cave that contain a wholly different environment than the surrounding earth or open space. Some cysts are empty, but others contain fiends and/or servants of Eltab. The largest cyst, known as the Hall of the Hidden Throne, lies in Eltab’s current location, the Citadel of Conjurers. This cyst contains Eltab’s palace and the calling circle that tied Eltab to the Realms. In fact, until this circle is destroyed, Eltab cannot leave Faerun or return to the Abyss.

History[edit]

The demon lord Eltab was a potent force in the Abyss, rivaling the powers of Graz'zt, Orcus and even Demogorgon himself. However, during the ancient days of Faerun, the empires of Narfell and Raumathar engaged in a bitter war, which ultimately destroyed both empires. During this war, Eltab was summoned to Faerun by the so-called demon-binders of Narfell, so he could be used as a pawn against their hated enemy. Eltab lead a demonic horde on the behalf of Narfell and invaded Raumathan city of Rashemen, which he quickly conquered and set up himself up as its ruler.

Eltab’s rule was brief, as an alliance of spell-casters (including the Witches of Rashemen) overthrew Eltab. Eltab was forced to flee, but the Rashemen Witches caught up with him in the Sharawood, imprisoning him beneath the ground, and bound a dracolich called the Everlasting Wyrm to guard over him.

A hundred or so years later, followers of the dark god Myrkul, intending to plunder the hoard of the Everlasting Wyrm, discovered the imprisoned demon lord. They agreed to release Eltab under the condition that he serve Myrkul’s church for 99 years. With Eltab’s aid, the followers of Myrkul took control of the city of Shandaular and in its place, established the theocratic city of Eltabranar.

Later, Eltab prompted an ill-fated invasion of the nations of Unther and Mulhorand. Eltab was once again imprisoned, this time by the god-kings who led Mulhorand, into a demoncyst (see Realm Below) beneath Thaymount.

The infamous Red Wizards found Eltab more than 700 years later. The wizards used an ancient Narfelli demon-binding ritual and called Eltab forth to assist them in their war with the Mulhorandi god-kings. The god-kings’ armies were routed and the nation of Thay was established. When the Red Wizards found they couldn’t dismiss Eltab, they imprisoned him near the mouth of the river that now is named after the demon lord and built a capital city (named Eltabbar) over the prison.

More recently, the Thayan lich Szass Tam realized that Eltab would soon break out of his prison. He deliberately released Eltab with the intention of using a spell to permanently enslave Eltab. But his plan was foiled by a group of adventurers, allowing Eltab to escape into a demoncyst below Thaymount. During a retaliatory confrontation with Szass Tam, Eltab was seemingly destroyed, but thanks to the binding cast on him the ancient Narfelli demon-binders, he was magically transported to the Citadel of Conjurers in the nation of Impiltur, where he is currently plotting new plans for conquests and revenge.

Ereshkigal[edit]

Ereshkigal is a female demon lord mentioned in the Monster Manual 2.

Felex'ja[edit]

Felex'ja (d), The Tiger King, concerned with Tigers, felines, stalking predators. Covered in Dragon #357, page 67. Allied with Ansitif to destroy the Malgoth, but was assassinated by other demon lords soon after.

Fraz-Urb'luu[edit]

Fraz-Urb'luu
Fraz-Urb'luu.JPG
Fraz-Urb'luu, the Prince of Deception, in Monster Manual II.
Game background
Title(s) Prince of Deception
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon Lord
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Portfolio Deception
Superior None
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, Fraz-Urb'luu is a demon lord, sometimes known as the "Prince of Deception." In Gary Gygax's Gord novels, Fraz-Urb'luu is alternately called Var-Az-Hloo.

Publication history[edit]

Fraz-Urb'luu first appears in module The Lost Caverns of Tsojcanth (1982),[36] and then appears in the first edition Monster Manual II (1983),[68] under the demon entry.

Fraz-Urb'luu received a description for the Planescape campaign setting in Faces of Evil: The Fiends (1997).[69]

Fraz-Urb'luu was featured in the Demonomicon of Iggwilv column in Dragon #333 (2005).[70] He also appeared in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[71]

Description[edit]

Fraz-Urb'luu is a large beast over eighteen feet in height, despite his hunched posture. His muscular gorilla-like body is covered with short coarse hair of pale blue. His feet are broad and splayed, and his hands are large but the fingers relatively stubby and tipped with long, jagged talons. Two vast batlike wings protrude from his back. His tail is long and hairless with a gray base fading to a razor sharp base. His head is bald and gray-skinned, save for tufts of ragged hair hanging from his jowls. Large ragged ears protrude from the center of his skull to well above its pointed ridged peak. His eyes are relatively small but burn with cold blue light. Yet the most terrible aspect of his visage is his mouth which is overly large and filled with huge fangs.

History[edit]

The demon prince Fraz-Urb'luu was one of the first tanar'ri to rise to power in the Abyss after the fall of the obyriths. Although he was never the most powerful of the demon princes, his vast intellect has enabled him to outlive countless rivals. Fraz-Urb'luu eventually mastered the art of summoning, to the point where he could forcibly summon other demon lords into his court in order to humiliate and degrade them for his own amusement. Fraz-Urb'luu's staff, which granted him control of every aspect of his layer, discouraged any retaliatory strikes against him from his revenge-seeking "guests," so they conspired for a more subtle punishment.

These demon lords fashioned an artifact called the Ichor Lance, which they gave to the mad archmage Zagig Yragerne. Zagig summoned Fraz-Urb'luu and tried to use the lance on the Prince of Deception. Fraz-Urb'luu seized the lance and used his power to disjoin the artifact. However, as a side effect of destroying the lance, the demon prince lost all of his innate magical powers, which enabled Zagyg to imprison the demon prince in a bas-relief in the dungeon beneath Castle Greyhawk. For centuries, many adventurers in the dungeon were destroyed after speaking to this imprisoned form. The demon recently managed to escape by tricking a wizard and a cleric into freeing him. He then transported these fools, probably Erac's Cousin and his adventuring companion Ayelerarch, to his domain of Hollow's Heart in the Abyss after destroying all their gear and left them for dead.

Since then, Fraz-Urb'luu has spent much of his time eliminating other demon lords who moved into his territory with him away and searching for his staff.

Relationships[edit]

Fraz-Urb'luu is one of the most hated of the Abyssal lords, as several demon lords are still smarting from the memory of their past "audiences" with the Prince of Deception. Some of Fraz-Urb'luu's enemies include Graz'zt, Demogorgon, and Ugudenk, the writhing obyrith Lord of Worms and Hungry Parasites.

The Prince of Deception had also sworn revenge against all of humanity for his imprisonment and humiliation, for it was Zagyg (at the time a mere human) who was responsible for his confinement and loss of status.

Fraz-Urb'luu has at least one half-human son, sired before his imprisonment, the wizard Tsojcanth, whose mother was the witch Vilhara.

Realm[edit]

Fraz'Urb'luu rules the 176th layer of the Abyss. This realm, called Hollow's Heart, had reverted in Fraz-Urb'luu's absence to a wasteland of white dust under a black, starless sky. Various minor demon nobles had moved into Hollow's Heart during his imprisonment in order to stake out their own territories. Upon his return, Fraz-Urb'luu began the process of driving these squatters out of his domain.

At the height of his power, the demon lord could control the features and terrains of his layer at a whim, creating mountains and gorges within seconds. However, this required the use of the powerful Staff of Fraz-Urb'luu, which was stolen at the time of his imprisonment and has since been sundered into several pieces, all of which are scattered across the various planes of existence. The Prince of Deception therefore now focuses his attention on searching for his staff so that he may regain full control over his realm.

Other publishers[edit]

Fraz-Urb'luu appeared under the "demon" heading in the Tome of Horrors (2002) from Necromancer Games.[72]

Gorion[edit]

Gorion is a demon lord mentioned in "Dragon" #139.

Graz'zt[edit]

List of demon lords
Game background
Title(s) The Dark Prince
Home plane The Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Superior none
Design details

Graz'zt is a demon lord in the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, and one of the most powerful demons in the Abyss. Graz'zt, one of the earliest and most famous demons created for Dungeons and Dragons,[73] was named as one of the greatest villains in D&D history by the final print issue of Dragon.[60]

Gresil[edit]

Gresil
Game background
Title(s) Custodian of Records
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Abyssal lore
Design details

Gresil, Custodian of Records, is the demon lord of Abyssal lore, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Gresil was one of many demon lords that was mentioned only by name in a list in the original Monster Manual II (1983).[74]

Gresil was briefly mentioned in the article "Artifacts of Oerth: Instruments of the Gods", a 2002 article which ran in both Living Greyhawk Journal #10,[75] and Dragon #294.[76] Gresil received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[2]

Realm[edit]

Gresil has millions of texts in his great library, and it is said that the artifact Kuroth's Quill can be destroyed by using it to transcribe all of these texts.[75][76]

Haagenti[edit]

Haagenti
Game background
Title(s) Demon Lord of Alchemy and Artifice
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Portfolio Alchemy, Artifice
Design details

Haagenti is the demon lord of Alchemy and Artifice, in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

Haagenti was first mentioned in the article "Demonomicon of Iggwilv: Zuggtmoy" in Dragon #337 (November 2005), by James Jacobs.[77] Haagenti received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[78]

Haagenti received further description in the fourth edition book Demonomicon (2010).[3]

Description[edit]

Haagenti is rumored to be a living construct, perhaps the last surviving member of a now-extinct race forged at the dawn of time.

Relationships[edit]

Zuggtmoy is sometimes seen cavorting in his palace.

Realm[edit]

Haagenti's layer of the Abyss is catalogued as the 548th, known as Garavond. Garavond is a metallic orb within a lightless, airless void. The orb is Haagenti's fortress, laboratory, and palace, and it crawls with retrievers, clockwork horrors, golems, and more exotic constructs. When he wills it, Haagenti can fill the void around his fortress with magma, lightning, or any other element he chooses.

Garavond has no connection to the Grand Abyss, the fourth layer of the Abyss, but portals to the layer can be found in the Abyss's first layer, Pazunia, and in Shedaklah, the layer where Zuggtmoy and Juiblex contend. Haagenti's servants collect many of their lord's alchemical reagents in Shedaklah.

Other publishers[edit]

In Armies of the Abyss (2002) by Erik Mona, Haagenti's areas of concern are said to include alchemy, wealth, transmogrification, experimentation, progress, and the creation of artificial life. He is described as resembling a great amber bull with dimly glowing, pulsating red eyes, a raspy, echoing voice, and two feathered wings.[4]

Haagenti appeared in Paizo Publishing's book Book of the Damned, Vol. 2: Lords of Chaos (2010), on page 16.[79] In Lords of Chaos (2010) by James Jacobs, Haagenti's title is the Whispers Within and he is called the demon lord of alchemy, invention, and transformation. His worshipers are said to include alchemists, drow, non-werewolf lycanthropes, and shapeshifters. While his true form is said to be a winged bull, he is a shapeshifter who typically takes the form of whatever race he is interacting with. In both Armies of the Abyss and Lords of Chaos, Haagenti's realm is named Cerebulim.[6]

Ilsidahur[edit]

Ilsidahur
Game background
Title(s) The Howling King
Home plane Abyss
Power level demon lord
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Superior Demogorgon
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, Ilsidahur is a demon lord. Called the Howling King, he claims rulership over the simian demons known as bar-lguras, and is served by nalfeshnees as well.

Publishing history[edit]

Ilsidahur made his debut in Dungeon #10, in the adventure "The Shrine of Ilsidahur" (March/April 1988). The adventure took place in an abandoned temple located in the Amedio Jungle in the World of Greyhawk campaign setting.[80]

Ilsidahur was mentioned years later in the publication of Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss in 2006.[81] Ilsidahur was mentioned briefly in Demogorgon's entry in "The Demonimicon of Iggwilv" series in Dragon #357 (2007).[82]

Ilsidahur received further description in the fourth edition book Demonomicon (2010).[83]

Description[edit]

Ilsidahur appears as a 12-foot-tall (3.7 m) ape with a long prehensile tail and bronze ram-like horns. He particularly prizes objects made of bronze. It is assumed his layer of the Guttering Grove is a jungle realm filled with bar-lguras, nalfeshnees and other simian monsters[original research?].

Relationships[edit]

Ilsidahur is an ally of Demogorgon; he guards the landward access to Demogorgon's layer, Gaping Maw. The two once conspired to slay the eladrin paragon Gwynharwyf, but she was rescued by her consort Morwel while the two demons were squabbling over how best to torture her to death.

Realm[edit]

Ilsidahur rules the 90th layer of the Abyss called the Guttering Grove.

Ixinix[edit]

Ixinix (d), the Lord of Blackwater allied with Ansitif to destroy the Malgoth. He is covered in Dragon #357, page 67.

Juiblex[edit]

Juiblex
Juiblex.JPG
Game background
Title(s) The Faceless Lord
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Portfolio Slimes, Oozes
Superior None
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, Juiblex, also called The Faceless Lord, is the demon lord of Slimes and Oozes. Juiblex's lair is on the 222nd layer of the Abyss, which he shares with Zuggtmoy, the Demoness Lady of Fungi. In Gary Gygax's Gord novels, Juiblex is alternately called Szhublox. His appearance is Lovecraftian, being grotesque, revolting and inhuman.[original research?]

Publishing history[edit]

Juiblex first appeared in the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons Monster Manual in 1977. In first edition, Juiblex rules his own layer of the Abyss, the 528th layer, which is an infinite sea of slimes and oozes feeding off each other's putrid forms.[84] Juiblex's palace, in module H4: The Throne of Bloodstone, is said to resemble the biggest pile of garbage in the multiverse.[85]

Juiblex was detailed as a deity in the book Monster Mythology (1992), including details about its worship.[39] Juiblex's role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[86]

Juiblex appeared, again as a demon lord, in the Book of Vile Darkness (2002).[87] Juiblex played an important role in the adventure "Caverns of the Ooze Lord" in Dungeon #132.[88] Juiblex was featured in the Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[89]

Juiblex was later updated for 4th edition in Dungeon #188.[90]

Description[edit]

Juiblex does not have a set physical form as we know it; those who have seen him claim he is a slime-like creature with glaring red eyes dotted all over his body. Juiblex supposedly can swallow creatures alive, spits acidic secretions and causes diseases in his victims which can be almost instantly fatal.

Relationships[edit]

Juiblex is one of the lesser demon lords. Most other demon lords do not take him seriously. He himself hates almost everything else, preferring the company of his shapeless minions: slimes, oozes, jellies and puddings. He has no plans or schemes: he simply wants to continue existing and destroying. He shares the layer of Shedaklah with the Lady of Fungi Zuggtmoy: the demoness rules the surface, whereas Juiblex's territory is entirely below ground.

In Gary Gygax's Gord novels by New Infinities, Juiblex is said to be a kinsdemon and ally of Zuggtmoy. This relationship set by Gygax was carried on to the game's second edition, especially in the Planescape setting, where the two demon lords now share the layer of Shedaklah. In third edition, this relationship became antagonistic.

History[edit]

When Zuggtmoy was imprisoned in the Temple of Elemental Evil, Juiblex took advantage of the situation and went on to conquer all of the layer's underground holdings, and parts of the surface as well.

Cult of Juiblex[edit]

Juiblex is also worshipped by a few renegade drow as the god of molds and slimes, two things of which are quite common in their subterranean homes. Other worshippers include a few goblin tribes. In the Forgotten Realms campaign setting, Juiblex's cult has been subsumed by the worshippers of the Elder Elemental God Ghaunadaur, the deity of oozes and slimes.

In second edition AD&D, Juiblex is a lesser deity of slimes and jellies. However, he does not take a very active role in the lives of his worshippers, who are unsure of what kind of god he is and the role that he plays. The aboleths, for example, believe Juiblex maintains the integrity of their skins. Juiblex's avatar only appears to priests using a gate spell. Juiblex does not use omens.

In Book of Vile Darkness, the Thrall of Juiblex prestige class was introduced.[87]

The Fleshless Brethren were a group of vile worshippers of Juiblex who successfully murdered half of the legendary Six from Shadow.[91]

Juiblex in other media[edit]

Juiblex is mentioned in Dungeons & Dragons: Wrath of the Dragon God.

A temple to Juiblex appears in the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons boxed set campaign, Night Below.

J'zzalshrak[edit]

J'zzalshrak
Game background
Title(s) The Errant General
Home plane Abyss
Power level Demon lord
Alignment Chaotic evil
Design details

J'zzalshrak is a demon lord in the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game.

Publication history[edit]

J'zzalshrak was first mentioned in the adventure "Bzallin's Blacksphere" in Dungeon #64 (September/October 1996).[92]

J'zzalshrak received further details in third edition in Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (2006).[12]

Description[edit]

J'zzalshrak is a beetle-like tanar'ri. She is also known as the Errant General, and her portfolio is Blood War campaigns.

Kardum[edit]

Kardum, Lord of the Balors, concerned with Balors, fire, lived on the 21st layer: The Sixth Pyre. Was introduced in Fiendish Codex I; based on Marduk by Gary Gygax.

References[edit]

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