Ashara guest house

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The Ashara guest house was an al Qaeda guest house located in "Kart-E-Parwan district of Kabul, Afghanistan" [sic].[1] The house was reported to have been managed by Abdul Hadi al-Iraqi—widely described as al Qaeda's third in command, with the assistance of Abdul Zahir, the tenth Guantanamo captive to face charges before a Guantanamo military commission.[citation needed] The house was reported to have been jointly financed by al Qaeda and the Taliban Defense Ministry.[2][3] In addition to serving as Abdul Hadi's headquarters for paying his network, it is reported that the graduates of al Qaeda's Afghan training camps were billeted there, prior to their assignments.[citation needed]

The house was also known as the "Number Ten Safe House".[4][5] It was capable of housing 25-50 occupants.[6]

Guantanamo captives Mohammed Ahmed Said Haidel, Hail Aziz Ahmad al Maythal, Omar Khalifa Mohammed Abu Bakr, Mohammed Ali Abdullah Bwazir, Omar Deghayes and Zuhail Abdo Anam Said Al Sharabi had their continued detention justified, in part, by allegations they had stayed at the guest house.[2][3][4][5][7][8][9][10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "USA v Abdul Zahir". Department of Defense. 2006-01-20. Archived from the original on 28 February 2010. Retrieved 2010-02-20. 
  2. ^ a b OARDEC (2007-06-12). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Mohammed Mohammed Ahmen Said". United States Department of Defense. Retrieved 2010-02-20. "A source stated the Ashara Guest House was run by a senior al Qaida member, received funding from the Taliban Defense Ministry and al Qaida headquarters in Afghanistan, and acted as a transition point for Arabs going to and coming from either the training camps or front line areas.”" 
  3. ^ a b OARDEC (2007-12-19). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Mahjoub, Omar Khalifa Mohammed Abu Bakr". United States Department of Defense. Retrieved 2010-02-20. "The Ashara guest house received fimding from the Taliban and al Qaida." 
  4. ^ a b OARDEC (2006-10-29). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Al Maythal, Hail Aziz Ahmad". United States Department of Defense. Retrieved 2010-02-20. "A source stated the Number Ten Safe House is also known as the Ashara Guest House that was used by people going back and forth from the front lines. A source stated the Ashara safe house was in Kabul, Afghanistan and was owned and operated by al Qaida." 
  5. ^ a b OARDEC (2007-12-06). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Al-Maythal, Hail Aziz Ahmad". United States Department of Defense. Retrieved 2010-02-20. 
  6. ^ OARDEC (2007-07-31). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Mohammed Ali Fowza". United States Department of Defense. Retrieved 2010-02-16. "The Ashara guest house was located in the Karta Par Wan area of Kabul, Afghanistan. A senior al Qaida member personally ran this guest house. This house acted as a transition point for Arabs going to and coming from training camps or frontline areas. The house could hold between 20 to 50 personnel . A guard was required to keep a log of all visitors to the house." 
  7. ^ OARDEC (2005-10-06). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Al Sharabi, Zuhail Abdo Anam Said". United States Department of Defense. Retrieved 2010-02-20. "The detainee was identified as being at the Ashara guesthouse and closely associated with the individual in charge of the Ashara guesthouse and who also commanded on the front lines." 
  8. ^ OARDEC (8 August 2006). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Deghayes, Omar Amer". United States Department of Defense. pp. 95–97. Archived from the original on 14 December 2007. Retrieved 2008-01-01. "A source stated that the Ashara guest house was owned by al Qaida and used by al Qaida members from Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Iraq, and Libya." 
  9. ^ OARDEC (25 October 2005). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Al Sharabi, Zuhail Abdo Anam Said". United States Department of Defense. pp. 21–23. Archived from the original on 3 December 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-09. 
  10. ^ OARDEC (12 October 2006). "Unclassified Summary of Evidence for Administrative Review Board in the case of Said, Zohair Mohammed". United States Department of Defense. pp. 63–65. Archived from the original on 3 December 2007. Retrieved 2007-11-09.