AsiaSat

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from AsiaSat 7)
Jump to: navigation, search
Asia Satellite Telecommunications Co. Ltd.
Industry Satellite communication
Founded 1988
Headquarters Hong Kong
Website www.asiasat.com

Asia Satellite Telecommunications Co. Ltd. (commonly AsiaSat, SEHK1135) is a commercial operator of communication spacecraft. AsiaSat is based in Hong Kong with two major shareholders, CITIC (34.8 per cent) and General Electric (34.1 per cent).


History[edit]

In December 2013, AsiaSat commissioned AsiaSat 9—to be built by Space Systems/Loral[1]—originally intending it to be launched in 2017.[2] However, by March 2015, the scheduled launch date had been moved up to mid-2016 in order to replace AsiaSat4 at 122 degrees east.[1]

In early 2015, AsiaSat reported a nine percent revenue drop, and a 27 percent drop in contracts, pointing to a regional oversupply of satellite communication services in the Asian regions it serves.[1] At that time, AsiaSat had four commsats in operation and had recently launched two more—AsiaSat 6 and AsiaSat8—which had added 22 percent additional bandwidht capacity into the shrinking market. Although revenues were down just nine percent—to HK$1365 billion—2014 profits declined by 25 percent over 2013, to HK$559 million.[1]

Launch history and future plans[edit]

This is a list of AsiaSat satellites, both launched and planned for future launch.

AsiaSat satellites
Satellite Launch Date
(UTC)
Rocket Launch Site Contractor Longitude Status Notes Ref.
AsiaSat 1 7 April 1990 China Long March 3 China Xichang LC-3 China CASC Decommissioned Launched as Westar 6 on Space Shuttle mission STS-41B, became stranded in orbit, was retrieved by Space Shuttle mission STS-51A in November 1984, sold to AsiaSat.
AsiaSat 2 28 November 1995 China Long March 2E China Xichang LC-2 China CASC 100.5° East Decommissioned
AsiaSat 3 24 December 1997 Russia Proton-K / DM-2M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/23 Russia United States ILS 105.5° East (intended)
158° West (1998)
62° West (1999-2002)
Decommissioned Transferred to Hughes Global Services
AsiaSat 3S 21 March 1999 Russia Proton-K / DM-2M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/23 Russia United States ILS 105.5° East In Service Replaced AsiaSat 1 in May 1999. [3]
AsiaSat 4 12 April 2003 United States Atlas IIIB United States Cape Canaveral LC-36B Russia United States ILS 122° East In Service [4]
AsiaSat 5 11 August 2009 Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 200/39 Russia United States ILS 100.5° East In Service A replacement satellite for AsiaSat 2 [5]
AsiaSat 6 7 September 2014 United States Falcon 9 v1.1 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX 120° East In Service [6]
AsiaSat 7 25 November 2011 Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 200/39 Russia United States ILS 105.5° East In Service To replace AsiaSat 3S at the orbital location of 105.5° East in late 2014. [7]
AsiaSat 8 5 August 2014 United States Falcon 9 v1.1 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX 105.5° East In Service AsiaSat satellite with multiple Ku beams. [8]
AsiaSat 9 2016 (Planned) 122° East Planned Being built 2013–2015 to be launched in mid-2016. Will replace AsiaSat 4 at 122 degrees east. [1][2]
AsiaSat G Planned

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e de Selding, Peter B. (2015-03-27). "AsiaSat Results Reflect Troop Withdrawals, Capacity Glut". Space News. Retrieved 29 March 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "AsiaSat: About Us". AsiaSat. Retrieved 7 October 2014. 
  3. ^ "AsiaSat 3S". AsiaSat. Retrieved 7 January 2014. 
  4. ^ "AsiaSat 4". AsiaSat. Retrieved 7 January 2014. 
  5. ^ "AsiaSat 5". AsiaSat. Retrieved 7 January 2014. 
  6. ^ "AsiaSat 6". AsiaSat. Retrieved 7 January 2014. 
  7. ^ "AsiaSat 7". AsiaSat. Retrieved 7 January 2014. 
  8. ^ "AsiaSat 8". AsiaSat. Retrieved 7 January 2014. 

External links[edit]