Asia Society

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Asia Society and Museum
Asia Society building, Manhattan, NY.jpg
Asia Society's New York City Headquarters and Museum
Asia Society is located in New York City
Asia Society
Location within New York City
Established 1956
Location 725 Park Avenue (at 70th Street), Manhattan, New York, USA
Coordinates 40°46′11″N 73°57′51″W / 40.7698°N 73.9643°W / 40.7698; -73.9643
Director (position vacant)
Public transit access NYCS 6 68th Street – Hunter College
NYCS F Lexington Avenue – 63rd Street
Bus: M1, M2, M3, M4, M101, M102, M30, M66
Website AsiaSociety.org

The Asia Society is a non-profit organization that focuses on educating the world about Asia. It has several centers in the United States (Houston, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington, DC) and around the world Hong Kong, Manila, Mumbai, Seoul, Shanghai, and Sydney. All of these centers are overseen by the Society’s headquarters in New York, which includes a museum that exhibits the Rockefeller collection of Asian art and rotating exhibits with pieces from many Asian countries including China, Japan, India, and Korea.

On June 10, 2013[1] Josette Sheeran, a former Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and World Economic Forum Vice Chair became the seventh president and CEO of the institution.

Mission[edit]

Asia Society logo.

The Asia Society defines the region of Asia as the area from Japan to Iran, from central Asia to Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands. The Asia Society is a non-profit, non-partisan organization whose aim is to build awareness about Asian politics, business, education, arts, and culture through education. The organization sponsors the exhibitions of art, performance, film, lectures, and programs for students and teachers. The programs are aimed at increasing knowledge of society with a focus on human rights, environment, global health and the position of women.

The Asia Society's original focus was explaining aspects about Asia to Americans, and Robin Pogrebin of The New York Times said that it was "[l]ong regarded as a New York institution with regional branches".[2] Around 2011 the society was refocusing efforts on augmenting partnerships amongst Asians and between Asians and Americans in business, culture, education, and public policy. In 2011 Pogrebin said "over the last few years has aimed to recast itself as an international organization, partly through the construction of the two major centers in cities where it previously had only offices."[2]

History[edit]

The Asia Society was founded in 1956 by John D. Rockefeller III. Initially established to promote greater knowledge of Asia in the US, today the Society is a global institution - with offices throughout the US and Asia — that fulfills its educational mandate through a wide range of cross-disciplinary programming. As economies and cultures have become more interconnected, the Society's programs have expanded to address Asian American issues, the effects of globalization, and pressing concerns in Asia including human rights, the status of women, and environmental and global health issues such as HIV/AIDS.[3]

Headquarters[edit]

The Society's Manhattan headquarters, at Park Avenue and East 70th Street on the Upper East Side, is an nine-story building faced in smooth red Oklahoma granite designed by Edward Larrabee Barnes in 1980. Since it replaced some old brownstones on one of the city's most prestigious streets, Barnes gave the building a strong facade to continue the line along Park, and set it back from East 70th with a terraced garden buffering it between the street and the older houses on that block. The semicircular window on the upper story and variations in the color and finish of the granite are intended to evoke Asian cultures. Paul Goldberger, architecture critic at The New York Times, called it "an ambitious building, full of civilized intentions, some of which succeed and others that do not". In the former category he put the interiors and the overall shape; in the latter he included the facade.[4]

In 1999, it was closed for 18 months so that new interiors, designed by Bartholomew Voorsanger, could be built. During that time the society used the former Christie's Manhattan offices on 59th Street as a temporary home. The completed renovation included a 24-foot-high (7.3 m) atrium and cafe. The expansion doubled the museum's exhibition space, allowing the society to put the entire Rockefeller Asian art collection on display.[5]

Robin Pogrebin of The New York Times said in 2011 that the Asia Society is "perhaps best known for the elegance of its headquarters and galleries on Park Avenue at 70th Street."[2]

Global centers[edit]

Asia Society Texas Center in Houston

Along with its New York headquarters, the Asia Society has centers throughout the United States and Asia. 2012 marked a major expansion, with the opening of multi-million dollar buildings in Hong Kong and Houston, Texas.[6] The Hong Kong complex, dedicated on February 9, 2012, is situated on the site of a former British military explosives magazine overlooking Hong Kong harbor and includes numerous restored military buildings. The project was designed by architects Tod Williams and Billie Tsien. The Houston building, located in the city's museum district, opened on May 6, 2012 and was designed by architect Yoshio Taniguchi. The other American centers are located in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Washington, DC. Other Asian centers are in Seoul, Manila, Shanghai and Mumbai. There is also a center located in Sydney, Australia.

Leadership[edit]

On May 21, 2013, Asia Society announced[1] that World Economic Forum Vice Chair Josette Sheeran, a former Executive Director of the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), would on June 10, 2013 become the seventh president and CEO of the institution.

Business[edit]

The Asia Society annually presents a Corporate Conference in Asia, which functions as a fundraiser, to examine the implications of macroeconomic trends and geopolitical developments for the region and the world. Heads of Asian governments are often featured, as well as roundtable discussions with business and policy leaders from around the world.[7]

Education[edit]

The Asia Society's Education department has two primary objectives: one focusing on teaching and learning about Asia in the United States and the other on the expansion of US investments in international studies at the elementary and secondary school levels.[5]

International education generally encompasses the knowledge of other world regions, cultures and global issues; skills in communicating in languages other than English, working in global or cross-cultural environments and using information from different sources around the world; and values of respect and concern for other cultures and peoples.

International Studies Schools Network[edit]

The Asia Society International Studies Schools Network (ISSN) comprises a select group of public elementary and secondary schools across the country with programs in "developing globally competent, college-ready high school students."[8] There are currently 27 schools in the network, covering both rural and urban communities and in cities throughout the U.S., from the Henry Street School for International Studies (New York, NY) and the Academy of International Studies (Charlotte, NC) to the Denver Center for International Studies (Denver, CO)to Vaughn International Studies Academy(San Fernando, CA) and the International Studies Learning Center (Los Angeles, CA).[9]

Fellowships[edit]

The Bernard Schwartz Fellows Program at Asia Society selects fellows to pursue research on business and policy issues with an emphasis on Asia-related areas of study. Selected persons work in residence at the Asia Society headquarters in New York or in its Washington Center.

The Getty Fellowship is an Asia Society Museum program that provides cross-cultural work experience in the field of Asian art curatorship.

Museum[edit]

The Asia Society Museum is host to both traditional and contemporary exhibitions, film screenings, literature, performing, and visual arts. The headquarters’ holdings includes works from more than thirty Asian-Pacific countries including Hindu and Buddhist statuary, temple carvings, Chinese ceramics, paintings, and Japanese art. Contemporary Asian art shows also take place. Exhibits change several times throughout the year. In 2001 a major renovation of the headquarters was undertaken doubling the size of the four public galleries.

The headquarters also houses a museum shop and café. Forbes has listed the Garden Court Cafe on its All-Star Eateries in New York list several times.

Notes[edit]


External links[edit]