Asper Biotech

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Asper Biotech[edit]

Asper Biotech is a genetic testing company, based in Tartu, Estonia, established in 1999 as a spin-off company of a research organization named the Estonian Biocentre. The company’s advisory board consists of outstanding scientists, among others Prof. Andres Metspalu and Prof. Ants Kurg.

Asper Biotech is focused on the diagnostics of common as well as rare genetic disorders classified into three testing portfolios: Asper Ophthalmics [1][2][3] includes a panel of tests targeting hereditary eye disorders; Asper Oncogenetics [4][5] provides tests to determine predisposition to various cancers; and Asper Reprogenetics [6] is specialized in reproduction problems and prenatal diagnosis. In addition, animal genetic testing services are assembled into the Asper Animal Genetics portfolio.

The company’s technology Arrayed Primer Extension (APEX) developed at the University of Tartu, allows simultaneous detection of hundreds of DNA alterations in many different genes. In addition to APEX, Asper Biotech performs testing using Sanger sequencing, next generation sequencing, MLPA analysis, and other technologies.

In collaboration with international scientific teams and research organizations, Asper Biotech develops and implements custom-made tests catering for the needs of the client.

The quality of Asper Biotech’s genetic testing procedures is confirmed by CLIA and ISO 9001:2008 certifications.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Arrayed primer extension technology simplifies mutation detection in Bardet-Biedl and Alström syndrome. Pereiro I, Hoskins BE, Marshall JD, Collin GB, Naggert JK, Piñeiro-Gallego T, Oitmaa E, Katsanis N, Valverde D, Beales PL. Eur J Hum Genet. 2011 Apr;19(4):485-8.
  2. ^ Microarray-based mutation analysis of 183 Spanish families suffering from Usher Syndrome. Jaijo T, Aller E, García-García G, Aparisi MJ, Bernal S, Avila-Fernandez A, Barragán I, Baiget M, Ayuso C, Antiñolo G, Díaz-Llopis M, Külm M, Beneyto M, Nájera C, Millan JM. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2009 Aug 13.
  3. ^ Genotyping microarray for CSNB-associated genes. Zeitz C, Labs S, Lorenz B, Forster U, Üksti J, Kroes HY, De Baere E, Leroy BP, Cremers FPM, Wittmer M, van Genderen MM, Sahel J-A, Audo I, Poloschek CM, Mohand-Saïd S, Fleischhauer J, Hüffmeier U, Veselina Moskova-Doumanova, Levin AV, Hamel CP, Leifert D, Munier FL, Schorderet DF, Zrenner E, Friedburg C, Wissinger B, Kohl S, Berger W. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, July 2, 2009.
  4. ^ Analysis of NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase-1/2 gene mutations in pediatric brain tumors: report of a secondary anaplastic astrocytoma carrying the IDH1 mutation. Mascelli S, Raso A, Biassoni R, Severino M, Sak K, Joost K, Milanaccio C, Barra S, Grillo-Ruggieri F, Vanni I, Consales A, Cama A, Capra V, Nozza P, Garrè ML. J Neurooncol. 2012 Jul 22.
  5. ^ APEX microarray panel for genotyping polymorphisms in cancer chemotherapy and estimation frequencies in a Slovak population. Soltysova A, Minarik G, Dzurenkova A, Sufliarska S, Kadasi L, Turna J, Mladosievicova B. Pharmacogenomics. 2011, 12(4), 577–592.
  6. ^ Genetic assessment following increased nuchal translucency and normal karyotype. Pergament E, Alamillo C, Sak K, Fiddler M. Prenat Diagn. 2011 Mar;31(3):307-10. doi: 10.1002/pd.2718. Epub 2011 Feb 15.

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