Association for India's Development

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Association for India's Development (AID)
Aid logo.jpg
AID logo
Motto संघर्ष सेवा निर्माण (Struggle Service Creation)
Formation 1991
Founder Aravinda Pillalamarri, Ravi Kuchimanchi
Type Volunteer movement
Legal status
Charity
Purpose Sustainable, Equitable and Just Development in the Republic of India
Region served
India
Main organ
Board of directors[1]
Website www.aidindia.org

The Association for India's Development, Inc. (AID) is a secular charity organization[2] based in the United States[3] which promotes "sustainable, equitable and just development". AID has won several awards for its work, including the 'Global Impact Award' by the prominent newspaper 'The Times of India'.[4]

Activities[edit]

AID supports grassroots organizations in India in interconnected spheres such as education, livelihoods, natural resources including land, water and energy, agriculture, health, women's empowerment and social justice.[5] AID supports rural technology centers[6]

Organization in the United States[edit]

AID consists of a decentralized network of chapters which raise and utilize funds independently. There were 36 chapters in 2010[7] with a total volunteer strength of around 1000.[8] The major activities of U.S. chapters are raising funds, reviewing and supporting projects in India and informing and mobilizing their communities about important social and developmental issues in India. There were about 100 projects actively supported by AID chapters in 2010.[8]

Organizations in India[edit]

AID has about eight active chapters in India,[9] with a combination of AID U.S. volunteers who have returned to India and volunteers who have joined the organization directly in India. The main activities of AID chapters in India include the formulation and execution of various projects and monitoring non AID India NGOs that AID supports.

Jeevansaathis[edit]

The Jeevansaathi program began in 1998 to enable and encourage AID volunteers to engage in full-time social work. AID Jeevansaathis make a commitment to work on development issues, being part of AID's network and opening up new directions for AID to explore. Only ex-AID volunteers are eligible to become Jeevansathis. Currently AID has seven Jeevansaathis.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Who is Who, that's what I want to know!, Association for India's Development, archived from the original on 13 July 2010, retrieved 2010-06-03 
  2. ^ Prashad, Vijay (2000). The karma of Brown folk. U of Minnesota Press. p. 121. ISBN 978-0-8166-3439-2. 
  3. ^ Asgharzadeh, A.; Oka, K.; Lawson, E. (2007). Diasporic Ruptures: Globality, Migrancy, and Expressions of Identity. Sense. p. 47. ISBN 978-90-8790-050-2. 
  4. ^ "For this NGO, all roads lead to India". Times of India. September 20, 2011. Retrieved 1 November 2011. 
  5. ^ AID - About Us, Association for India's Development, archived from the original on 12 June 2010, retrieved 2010-06-03 
  6. ^ Cozzens, Susan E. (2010). Nanotechnology and the Challenges of Equity, Equality and Development. Springer. p. 404. ISBN 978-90-481-9614-2. 
  7. ^ AID chapters, Association for India's Development, archived from the original on 16 June 2010, retrieved 2010-06-03 
  8. ^ a b AID - About Us, Association for India's Development, archived from the original on 12 June 2010, retrieved 2010-06-03 
  9. ^ AID - AID-India Chapters, Association for India's Development, archived from the original on 30 April 2010, retrieved 2010-06-03 
  10. ^ AID - Jeevansaathis, Association for India's Development, archived from the original on 5 June 2010, retrieved 2010-06-03 

External links[edit]