Association for Library Service to Children

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The Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) is a division of the American Library Association. Its members are concerned with the profession of children's librarianship. ALSC's network includes children's and youth librarians, children's literature experts, publishers, education and library school faculty members, and other adults dedicated to creating a better future for children through libraries. ALSC has over 60 active committees including which carry out the work of the Association, developing valuable programs, publications, and resources for youth librarians. ALSC also administers El día de los niños/El día de los libros (Children's Day/Book Day) and Every Child Ready to Read, their joint effort with the Public Library Association. ALSC chooses the recipients of some of the world's most prestigious annual children's literature awards.

Awards[edit]

ALSC announces the awards listed below every January at a Monday morning press conference that takes place during the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting.[1]

  • The Newbery Medal was named for eighteenth-century British bookseller John Newbery. It is awarded annually to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.[2] In the past 88 years (1922–2009), 88 titles have been honored with the award. In addition, as runners-up, 287 titles have received the Newbery Honor.[3]
  • The Caldecott Medal was named in honor of nineteenth-century English illustrator Randolph Caldecott. It is awarded annually to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children.[4] In the past 72 years (1938–2009), 72 titles have been honored with the award. In addition, as runners-up, 228 titles have received the Caldecott Honor Honor.[5]
  • The Arbuthnot Award was named in honor of twentieth-century American educator May Hill Arbuthnot.[6] It is awarded annually to honor an author, critic, librarian, historian, or teacher of children's literature, of any country, who then presents a lecture at a winning host site.[1] In the past 40 years (1970–2009), 40 people have been honored with the award.[7]
  • The Batchelder Award was named in honor of twetieth-century American librarian Mildred L. Batchelder.[8] It is given to an American publisher for a children's book considered to be the most outstanding of those books originally published in a foreign language in a foreign country, and subsequently translated into English and published in the United States.[1] In the past 41 years (1968–2009), 41 titles have been honored with the award. In addition, as runners-up, 22 titles have been cited with the Batchelder Honor.[9]
  • The Belpré Medal was named in honor of twentieth-century Puerto Rican librarian Pura Belpré. It is given in honor to a Latino or Latina writer and illustrator whose works best portray, affirm, and celebrate the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth. It has been given every other year since 1996. Beginning with the 2009 award, it will be given annually.[10] In the past 14 years (1996–2009), 8 titles have been honored with the award for writing and 8 titles have been honored with the award for illustrations. In addition, as runners up, 19 titles have been cited with the Belpré Honor for writing and 21 titles have been cited with the Belpré Honor for illustrations.[11]
  • Andrew Carnegie, American philanthropist
    The Carnegie Medal was named in honor of nineteenth-century American philanthropist Andrew Carnegie.[12] It honors the producer of the most outstanding video production for children.[12] In the past 19 years (1991–2009), 19 titles have been honored with the award[13]
  • The Geisel Award was named in honor of twentieth-century American author Theodor Seuss Geisel. It is given annually to the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished American book for beginning readers published in English in the United States during the preceding year.[14] In the past 4 years (2006–2009), 4 titles have been honored with the award. In addition, as runners-up, 14 titles have been cited as Geisel Honor boods.[15]
  • The Odyssey Award was named in honor of the Homer's eighth century BC epic poem to remind us of the ancient roots of storytelling, while living in our modern world.[16] The Odyssey Award is jointly given and administered by the ALSC and the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), another division of the ALA. It is sponsored by Booklist magazine, a publication of the ALA.[16] In the past 2 years (2008–2009), 2 titles have been honored with the award. In addition, as runners-up, 10 titles have been cited as Odyssey Honor boods.[17]
  • The Sibert Medal was named in honor of twentieth-century American publisher Robert F. Sibert. It honors the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished informational book.[18] In the past 9 years (2001–2009), 9 titles have been honored with the award. In addition, as runners-up, 23 titles have been cited as Silbert Honor boods.[19]
  • Laura Ingalls Wilder, American author
    The Wilder Medal was named in honor of twentieth-century American author Laura Ingalls Wilder.[20] It honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, over a period of years, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children.[20] In the past 55 years (1954–2009), 17 authors have been honored with the award.[21]

In addition to the above listed awards, ALSC produces four lists of notable media titles:

  • Great Websites for Kids (new sites added three times a year, current sites reviewed twice a year)[22]
  • Notable Children's Books (annual)[23]
  • Notable Children's Recordings (annual)[24]
  • Notable Children's Videos (annual)[25]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "The ALSC media awards". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 6 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  2. ^ "Newbery Medal". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 16 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  3. ^ "Newbery Medals and Honors (1922-present)". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 21 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  4. ^ "Caldecott Medal". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 17 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  5. ^ "Caldecott Medals and Honors (1938-present)". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 16 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  6. ^ "ALSC May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture Award". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 9 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  7. ^ "Past Lecturers". American Library Association. 2008. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  8. ^ "About the Mildren L. Batchelder Award". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 20 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  9. ^ "Batchelder Awards". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 13 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  10. ^ "Belpré Medal". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 17 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  11. ^ "Belpré Medal Winners". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 6 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  12. ^ a b "About the Carnegie Medal". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 13 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  13. ^ "Carnegie winners". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 10 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  14. ^ "the (Theodor Seuss) Geisel Award home page". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 9 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  15. ^ "(Theodor Seuss) Geisel Award Medal winners and honor books, 2006 - present". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 18 March 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  16. ^ a b "About the Odyssey Award for Excellence in Audiobook Production". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 10 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  17. ^ "Odyssey Award home page". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 6 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  18. ^ "Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal home page". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 9 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  19. ^ "Robert F. Sibert Medal winners and honor books, 2001-present". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 11 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  20. ^ a b "About the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 7 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  21. ^ "Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, Past winners". American Library Association. 2008. Archived from the original on 11 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-17. 
  22. ^ "Great Websites for Kids - About". Association for Library Service to Children. Retrieved 2013-03-11. 
  23. ^ "Notable Children's Books". Association for Library Service to Children. Retrieved 2013-03-11. 
  24. ^ "Notable Children's Recordings". Association for Library Service to Children. Retrieved 2013-03-11. 
  25. ^ "Notable Children's Videos". Association for Library Service to Children. Retrieved 2013-03-11.