Association of Performing Arts Presenters

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The Association of Performing Arts Presenters (also known as APAP or Arts Presenters), based in Washington, D.C.,[1] is the United States' largest organization of arts professionals.[2] Founded in 1957 as the Association of College and University Concert Managers (ACUCM), the organization officially incorporated as a 501(c)3 non-profit organization in 1969.[3] It became the In Association of College, University and Community Arts Administrators (ACUCAA) in 1973, but by the mid-1980s it was no longer predominantly college- and university based, and it adopted its current name in 1988.[3] APAP is a founding member of the Performing Arts Alliance.[4]

Today, the association represents the nonprofit and for-profit sectors of the presenting and touring industry of the performing arts in the U.S. and internationally, with member organizations from all 50 U.S. states and at least 28 countries.[4] Members include large performing arts centers in major cities, outdoor festivals, rural community-focused organizations, academic institutions, individual artists, and artist managers and booking agents, and representing disciplines including various forms of dance, music, theater, puppetry, circus, magic, attractions and performance art.[3] As of October 2008, there were 1910 organization and individual members.[3]

The association holds an annual January conference in New York City;[5] the 2013 event featured roughly 1,000 showcase performances; more than 3,000 presenters attended.[6] Other events are timed to take advantage of this confluence of arts presenters: for example, New York's Winter Jazzfest schedules to coincide with the conference and is heavily attended by the conferencegoers.[7]

Awards granted[edit]

APAP grants several awards: the Award of Merit, the Fan Taylor Distinguished Service Award, The William Dawson Award for Programmatic Excellence, and the Sidney R. Yates Advocacy Award.[8]

Winners of the Award of Merit for achievement in the performing arts:

Winners of the Fan Taylor Distinguished Service Award for exemplary service to the field of professional presenting:

  • Alicia Adams (2012)
  • Ken Fischer (2011)
  • Byron Gustafson (2010)
  • Phil Bither (2009)
  • Kenneth Foster (2008)
  • Colleen Jennings-Roggensack (2007)
  • Robert Browning (2006)
  • Terrence Jones (2005)
  • John Killacky (2004)
  • Olga Garay (2003)
  • Susie Farr (2002)
  • Jacqueline Davis (2001)
  • Ivan Sygoda (2000)
  • Tim Van Leer (1999)
  • Jo Long (1998)
  • Bill Mitchell (1996)
  • Klaus W. Kolmar (1995)
  • Arnie Malina (1994)
  • John Gingrich (1993)
  • Gerald Yoshitomi (1992)
  • David White (1991)
  • Ralph Sandler (1990)
  • Jan Oetinger (1989)
  • Halsey North (1988)
  • Lawrence Wilker (1987)
  • Henry Bowers (1986)
  • Gail Rector (1985)
  • Tom Bacchetti (1984)
  • Bill Dawson (1983)
  • Rudy Alexander (1982)
  • Jack Cohan (1981)
  • Ella Pratt (1980)
  • Betty Connors (1979)
  • Jim Wockenfuss (1978)
  • Wayne Stark (1977)
  • Howard Jones (1976)
  • Jerry Willis (1975)
  • Francis Inglis (1973)
  • Fan Taylor (1972)

Winners of the William Dawson Award for Programmatic Excellence for sustained achievement in programming:

Winners of the Sidney R. Yates Advocacy Award for outstanding advocacy on behalf of the performing arts:

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "About" page, apap365.org, official site of APAP. Accessed online 2013-01-14.
  2. ^ "Arts Administrators Select a President", New York Times, 2000-06-05, p. E8. Accessed on Proquest (requires paid membership), 2013-01-14.
  3. ^ a b c d History, apap365.org, official site of APAP. Accessed online 2013-01-14.
  4. ^ a b Performing Arts Presenting In America, theperformingartsalliance.org (Performing Arts Alliance). Accessed online 2013-01-14.
  5. ^ Andrew Boynton, Jodi Melnick: Like Water Made Human, online blog of The New Yorker, 2013-01-14. Accessed online 2013-01-14.
  6. ^ Will Friedwald, The Jazz Scene: Conference Calls, Brass Bands, Free Thinkers, Wall Street Journal, 2013-01-10. Accessed online 2013-01-14.
  7. ^ Nate Chinen, Taking In the Winter Jazzfest (Or Trying to, Anyhow), New York Times blog, 2013-01-13. Accessed online 2013-01-14.
  8. ^ Association of Performing Arts Presenters Awards Recipients, apap365.org, official site of APAP. Page includes a full list of award winners. Accessed 2013-01-20.

External links[edit]

  • APAP, official site
  • APAP|NYC, annual conference, official site