Atfih

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Atfih
Atfih is located in Egypt
Atfih
Atfih
Location in Egypt
Coordinates: 29°25′N 31°15′E / 29.417°N 31.250°E / 29.417; 31.250Coordinates: 29°25′N 31°15′E / 29.417°N 31.250°E / 29.417; 31.250
Country  Egypt
Governorate Cairo
Population (2001)
 • Total 106,300
Time zone EST (UTC+2)
 • Summer (DST) +3 (UTC)

Atfih (Egyptian Arabic: أطفيح Aṭfīḥ  pronounced [ʔɑtˤˈfiːħ]) is a town in Middle Egypt. It was part of the now defunct Helwan Governorate from April 2008 to April 2011, after which it was reincorporated into the Cairo Governorate. As of 2001, it has a population of 106,300 inhabitants.

Etymology[edit]

The name is derived from Ancient Egyptian Tpyhwt, meaning the first of the cows, referring to Hathor. The name became Petpeh in Coptic, from which is derived the Arabic version Atfih (أطفيح). The city was also known in Greco-Roman Egypt as Aphroditopolis.

Overview[edit]

Atfih is located at the coordinates 29°25′00″N 31°15′00″E / 29.41667°N 31.25000°E / 29.41667; 31.25000, in the area of ancient Maten, Upper Egypt's lowest nome.

Some of the Ancient Egyptian monuments discovered in the town include an animal necropolis, Greco-Roman tombs, and sepulchers of cows in huge limestone tombs.

On 1 March 2011, the town's core in Atfih has seen skirmishes between some Muslim and Christian people. And that happened because there was a relationship between a young Christian and a Muslim girl. When some people tried to blame the girl's father on, a brawl started and ended by killing the girl's father and one of his relatives. An outrage arose and Muslims of the town went to the church of the two martyrs and set it on fire. Hence, the Christians demonstrated in front of Maspiro television building demanding that the church should be built in the same place and Christians should be returned to their homes in the town safely. Prime Minister Essam Sharaf visited them to calm the situation and the priest Mtawos Wahba has been released. the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces pledged to rebuild the church. Some of religious, political and public figures have intervened to calm the situation, including the Islamic scholar Sheikh Mohamed Hassan, and the Islamic preacher Amr Khaled.

See also[edit]