Atinale Al Precio

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Atínale Al Precio
AtinaleAlPrecio2010.png
Created by Bob Stewart
Developed by Grundy (1997-2000)
FremantleMedia (2010)
Presented by Marco Antonio Regil (1997-2000, 2010)
Héctor Sandarti (2000)
Narrated by Jaime Kurt (1997-1999)
Julio César Palomera (1999-2000, 2010)
Country of origin Mexico
No. of episodes 900
Production
Location(s) Televisa Studios
Mexico City, Mexico
Running time 60 Minutes
Broadcast
Original channel Canal de las Estrellas
Picture format 480i (SDTV - 4:3) (1997-2000)
1080i (HDTV - 16:9) (2010)
Original run 1997  – 2000
April 12, 2010 - October 1, 2010
Chronology
Related shows The Price Is Right (1972-Present)

Atínale al Precio is a Mexican game show based on The Price Is Right that has aired in two separate runs, both hosted by Marco Antonio Regil (replaced by Héctor Sandarti in 2000). The format is similar to the American version of the show, featuring many pricing games that have also appeared on that version.

1997 version[edit]

The show[edit]

This version borrowed many elements from the American version (from set, game styles and music that sounds like a salsa version of the U.S. theme). Regil was pointed out by American host Bob Barker in the VIP of the audience of a U.S. episode in 1997 and was a candidate to host the US version during the 2007 tryouts. This show also included a light border in its intro, a la the U.S. show, but other elements were borrowed from the UK Bob Warman's show, like in-show sponsorship and a car in the Showcase Showdown.

One Bid[edit]

The four players in Contestants' Row compete in a One Bid qualifying game to determine which contestant will play the next pricing game. A prize usually worth MXN$2,500 or less is shown and, beginning with the last player to be called down (or the player farthest-left during the first One Bid), each contestant gives a single bid for the item. The order of bidding moves from left to right. Contestants must bid in whole pesos and may not bid the same amount as any player bid previously for that item. The player whose bid is closest to the actual retail price of the prize without going over wins the prize and plays the next pricing game.

If all four contestants overbid, a buzzer sounds before the price is revealed. The host announces the lowest bid, the bids are erased and the bidding process is repeated in the same manner with the contestants instructed to bid lower than the lowest of the original bids.

Pricing games[edit]

  • A la 1, A las 2, A las 3 (Easy as 1 2 3)
  • A lo dado, dado (Dice Game)
  • Al Final del Arcoiris (Golden Road)
  • 4 Rounds (Punch a Bunch)
  • 3 Strikes (Rules in effect in 1997 on US version used with three strikes in the bag; the one-strike rule, adopted in 1998, was not used in this version)
  • Cambalache (Switch?)
  • Cero A La Derecha (Grand Game)
  • Cinco Precios (Five Price Tags, never played for a car)
  • Contra Reloj (Race Game)
  • Cuestión Centavos (Penny Ante)
  • Dale Al Centro (Bullseye)
  • Dame Carta (Card Game)
  • De Par en Par (Money Game)
  • Dígito Aventura (Any Number)
  • ¿Dόnde Quedό La Bolita? (Shell Game)
  • Échatelo A la Bolsa (It's in the Bag)
  • El Apretón (Squeeze Play)
  • El Cofre del Tesoro (Fortune Hunter)
  • El Gato Encerrado (Secret "X")
  • El Misterio de los Números Perdidos (Mystery of lost numbers, not based in any US game)
  • El Panal (Spelling Bee)
  • El Revoltijo (2 for the Price of 1)
  • El Tiempo Es Oro (Clock Game)
  • Engarroteseme Ahí (Freeze Frame)
  • Entre Azúl y Buenas Noches (Magic #)
  • Escoge Un Par (Pick-a-Pair)
  • Hoyo En Uno o Dos (Hole in One or Two)
  • Juego de Poker (Poker Game)
  • La Caja Fuerte (Safe Crackers)
  • La Ganga (Barker's Bargain Bar/Bargain Game)
  • La Línea de la Fortuna (Line em Up)
  • La Llave Maestra (Master Key)
  • La Montaña Siniestra (Cliff Hangers, played with grocery items instead small prizes)
  • La Movida (Make Your Move)
  • La Zona Ganadora (Range Game)
  • Los Cazadores del Precio Perdido (Pathfinder)
  • Melón o Sandía (Double Prices, the top price represents "Melón" [cantaloupe] whereas bottom price represents "Sandía" [watermelon], rules are to say "Melón" or "Sandía" by both the contestant and audience to guess which price)
  • Número A La Casa (Pick-A-Number)
  • Para Un Lado O Para El Otro (Side by Side)
  • Plinko (Played with grocery items instead small prizes)
  • Rodar y Rodar (Let 'em Roll)
  • Te Doy Diez (Ten Chances; used wipes-off boards ala UK Bob Warman's show.)
  • Tentación (Tempatation)
  • Trece de La Suerte (Lucky $even)
  • Toma O De (Give or Keep)
  • Uno Arriba, Uno Abajo (One Away)

Showcase Showdown[edit]

The Showcase Showdown was played the same way as on the American version. If the wheel stopped at the MXN$1, the contestant won a bonus prize of MXN$1,000 and a bonus spin. In the bonus spin, if the wheel stopped on MXN$0.05, the contestant won a bonus prize of MXN$5,000; if it stopped on MXN$0.15, he won a bonus prize of MXN$15,000; and if it stopped on MXN$1, he won a new car.

The Showcase[edit]

The showcase followed the same rules as the U.S. version when the show aired in 1997, with a 100 peso rule for both showcases (the US version's rule changed in 1998 to USD 250, but the rule stayed at MXN$100). The closest bid without going over wins the showcase. If there was a double overbid neither wins the showcase. There was a double showcase winner twice. The first time, the difference was MXN$83, and the second time, it was MXN$36.


2010 version[edit]

The Show[edit]

This version incorporated elements from the American, British, French and Italian versions. From October 4, 2010 until January 21, 2011 there were repeating programs, was sponsored by the supermarket chain Chedraui, and cars were supplied by General Motors, the intro was similar to French show.

One Bid[edit]

The four players in Contestants' Row compete in a One Bid qualifying game to determine which contestant will play the next pricing game. A prize usually worth MXN$6,000 or less is shown and, beginning with the last player to be called down (or the player farthest-left during the first One Bid), each contestant gives a single bid for the item. The order of bidding moves from left to right. Contestants must bid in whole pesos and may not bid the same amount as any player bid previously for that item. The player whose bid is closest to the actual retail price of the prize without going over wins the prize and plays the next pricing game. However, a "cha-ching" sound signifies a perfect bid; whoever gave that exact bid would win a 1,000 peso bonus in addition.

If all four contestants overbid, a buzzer sounds before the price is revealed. The host announces the lowest bid, the bids are erased and the bidding process is repeated in the same manner with the contestants instructed to bid lower than the lowest of the original bids.

Pricing games[edit]

Differences from the U.S. version are listed.

  • A la 1, A las 2, A las 3 (Easy az 1 2 3)
  • 4 Rounds (Punch a Bunch, played with grocery items instead small prizes.)
  • 3 Strikes (October 2008 rules with 6-digit cars; first number given free, one strike in the bag.)
  • 5 Precios en Busca de Un Premio (Five Price Tags, never played for a car.)
  • Águila o Sol (Flip Flop, first number was given for free.)
  • Cambalache (Switch?)
  • Cambiadero (Switcheroo. Played for a car, three 3-digit prizes, and one 2-digit prize.)
  • Cero de La Fortuna (Grand Game with six items)
  • Contra Reloj (Race Game)
  • Contrapeso (Balance Game)
  • ¿Cuánto Fue? (Check-Out)
  • Cubreprecios (Cover Up)
  • Dígito Aventura (Any Number)
  • ¿Dόnde Quedό La Bolita? (Shell Game, played with groceries instead small prizes.)
  • Échatelo A la Bolsa (It's in the Bag)
  • El Apretón (Squeeze Play)
  • El Cofre del Tesoro (Fortune Hunter; game had been retired from U.S. version at the time)
  • El Derroche (Hi Lo)
  • El Gato Encerrado (Secret "X")
  • El Panal (Spelling Bee, except in earliest playings was played with groceries.)
  • El Tiempo Es Oro (Clock Game, 45 seconds played)
  • ¡Está Carísimo! (That's Too Much!)
  • Hoyo En Uno o Dos (Hole in One or Two)
  • La Caja Fuerte (Safe Crackers)
  • La Ganga (Barker's Bargain Bar; game was removed from U.S. rotation at the time; now known as Bargain Game)
  • La Llave Maestra (Master Key, played with groceries.)
  • La Montaña Siniestra (Cliff Hangers, played with grocery items.)
  • La Morralla (Pocket ¢hange)
  • La Zona Ganadora (Range Game)
  • Límite de Crédito (Credit Card; game was removed from U.S. rotation at the time.)
  • Melón o Sandía (Double Prices; rules are same as above)
  • Número A La Casa (Pick-a-Number)
  • Para Un Lado O Para El Otro (Side by Side)
  • Pasa El Peso (Pass the Buck)
  • Paso A Pasito (Step Up)
  • Plinko (Played for a MXN$100,000 cash prize, and played with grocery items.)
  • Rodar y Rodar (Let 'em Roll)
  • Tanque Lleno (Gas Money; 2008-09 rules used in that price of car had to be picked first, then the contestant had to discard the four wrong prices.)
  • Trece de La Suerte (Lucky $even; a MXN$13 rule was in effect)
  • Uno Arriba, Uno Abajo (One Away)
  • Vamos A Mitas (1/2 Off)
  • Vienes o Te Vas (Coming or Going)

Showcase Showdown[edit]

La Ruleta (The Showcase Showdown) followed faithfully to the United States version in the first and second Showcase Showdowns, with the wheel's patterns faithful to the counterpart to the north (100, 15, 80, 35, 60, 20, 40, 75, 55, 95, 50, 85, 30, 65, 10, 45, 70, 25, 90, 5). The bonus for MXN$1 (one or two spins) was worth MXN$1,000.

The bonus spin was administered in the same way as the original Mexican version. If the wheel stopped on the MXN$.05, the bonus was MXN$5,000. If the wheel stopped on MXN$1, a new car was awarded. If the wheel stopped on MXN$.15, the contestant won MXN$15,000.

At the end of the second Showcase Showdown, the two winners participated in a spinoff to determine the player who advances to the one-player Showcase. There were no bonuses for going MXN$1 in this spin.

Gran Paquete (The Showcase)[edit]

The Showcase was played in the one-player format similar to European versions and the 1994 syndicated version of the show, with the price ranges between MXN$2,500 and MXN$30,000, and whatever the contestant stopped was the range the contestant had to come from the actual retail price of the Showcase without going over to win it. The closest win was MXN$16 from the actual retail price.

References[edit]