Attap dwelling

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
A house with atap roof and walls. Image:Tropenmuseum
Detail of atap roof thatching.

An attap dwelling is traditional housing found in the kampongs of Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. Named after the attap palm, which provides the wattle for the walls, and the leaves with which their roofs are thatched,[1] these dwellings can range from huts to substantial houses. Until the nineteenth century even significant public buildings such as temples were built in this manner. The attap dwelling was used as the inspiration for the natural cross ventilation system for Newtown Suites, by WOHA Architects, Singapore.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Normand-Prunieres, p. 4

Sources[edit]