Auburn Doubledays

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Auburn Doubledays
Founded in 1982
Auburn, New York
AuburnDoubledays.png AuburnDoubledaysCapLogo.PNG
Team logo Cap insignia
Class-level
Current Short-Season A (1982–present)
Minor league affiliations
League New York-Penn League (1982–present)
Division Pinckney Division
Major league affiliations
Current Washington Nationals (2011-present)
Previous

Toronto Blue Jays (2001–2010)

Minor league titles
League titles 2007, 1998
Division titles 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2011
Team data
Nickname Auburn Doubledays (1996–present)
Previous names Auburn Astros (1982–1995)
Ballpark Falcon Park II (1995–present)
Previous parks Falcon Park I (1958–1994)
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
Auburn Community Owned Non-Profit Baseball Association, Inc.
Manager Gary Cathcart
General manager Mike Voutsinas

The Auburn Doubledays[1] are a minor league baseball team in Auburn, New York, USA, that is owned and operated by Auburn Community Baseball. They are a member of the Short-Season Class A New York-Penn League and have been a farm team of the Houston Astros (1982–2000), the Toronto Blue Jays (2001–2010), and Washington Nationals (from 2011).[2]

The Doubledays are the most recent name of the Auburn entry in the New York-Penn League that dates back to 1958. From 1982–1995, the team operated as the Auburn Astros.

The Doubledays play home games at Leo Pinckney Field at Falcon Park. The "new" Falcon Park opened in June 1995, replacing the original Falcon Park which was built in 1927 on the same site. Falcon Park seats 2,800 fans. In 2008, new blue box seats were installed.

The team and its mascot are named after Abner Doubleday, the Civil War general and Auburn native apocryphally credited with inventing the game of baseball. Abner wears number 96 in honor of the birth of the team in 1996.

History[edit]

Baseball in Auburn dates back to at least 1958. The current franchise began operations in 1982.

In 1998 the Doubledays and the Oneonta Yankees were named Co-Champions of the NY Penn League after Central New York was hit with a torrential rain storm and the fields at both parks were deemed unplayable.

The Doubledays won the Pinckney Division title for six straight years in 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007, but failed to win the league championship for the first five of those years. After losing in the first round of the playoffs for the first three years of their streak, they advanced to the New York – Penn League Championship series before being swept by the Staten Island Yankees. In 2003, the Doubledays led all of baseball in winning percentage (.757).

The Doubledays finally won the NY Penn League title in 2007, sweeping the Brooklyn Cyclones in the League Championship series. The final game featured a stellar pitching performance by Brett Cecil and a home run by J.P. Arencibia.[3] This was the first league championship for the city of Auburn since 1973.

Players who played in Auburn[edit]

Catcher[edit]

1st Base[edit]

2nd Base[edit]

3rd Base[edit]

Shortstop[edit]

Right Field[edit]

Center Field[edit]

Left Field[edit]

Starting Pitchers[edit]

Bullpen[edit]

Wall of Fame[edit]

See Auburn Community Baseball.

Auburn Baseball Prior Affiliates[edit]

See Auburn Community Baseball.

Roster[edit]

Auburn Doubledays roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

  • 28 Cory Bafidis
  • 26 Jake Joyce
  • 27 David Napoli
  • 11 Robert Orlan
  • 31 Ryan Ullmann

Catchers

  • 25 Austin Chubb
  •  6 Andruth Ramirez
  • 44 Matt Reistetter

Infielders

  •  2 Cody Dent
  •  8 Cody Gunter
  • -- Brennan Middleton
  • -- Manny Rodriguez
  • 23 Jean Carlos Valdez

Outfielders

  • 12 Brenton Allen
  • -- Gilberto Ramirez
  •  1 Greg Zebrack

Manager

  • 24 Gary Cathcart

Coaches

60-day disabled list {{{Disabled}}}
Injury icon 2.svg 7-day disabled list
* On Washington Nationals 40-man roster
∞ Reserve list
§ Suspended list
‡ Restricted list
# Rehab assignment
Roster updated April 3, 2014
Transactions
More MiLB rosters
Washington Nationals minor league players

Batboy: Brenden Weingarten

References[edit]

External links[edit]