Audenshaw School

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Audenshaw School
Audenshaw school logo.svg
Motto Carpe Diem (Seize the Day)
Established 1932
Type Academy
Headteacher Mrs J Saw[1]
Location Hazel Sreet
Audenshaw
Greater Manchester
M34 5NB
England Coordinates: 53°28′00″N 2°07′08″W / 53.4668°N 2.1188°W / 53.4668; -2.1188
DfE URN 136273 Tables
Ofsted Reports Pre-academy reports
Students 1,272
Gender Boys (coeducational sixth form)
Ages 11–18
Colours Red, white and black             
Publication The Audit, The Sixth Form Journal
Website www.audenshawschool.org.uk

Audenshaw Academy Trust is an all-boys secondary school in Audenshaw, Greater Manchester, England, established in 1932 as Audenshaw Grammar School. An adjoining co-educational sixth form college was opened in 1997, the same year the school was granted foundation school status. On 1 September 2010 the school became an academy changing its name from 'Audenshaw School'. Audenshaw, a specialist Technology College, is the only non-denominational school in the Metropolitan Borough of Tameside.[2] The school is one of only 32 schools who were given permission to convert by the start of the new academic year.

The latest school Ofsted Report carried out in October 2014 gave Audenshaw School an overall, lower, rating of 4 (Inadequate). The previous report from November 2013 awarded the school a grade 3 (requires improvement). Prior to the November 2013 report the school had been rated as 'Outstanding'.[3]

The current headteacher is Mrs. Jeanette Saw (MInstAM, ADSBM). Mrs Saw was appointed by governors in June 2013; she is the first female Head of Audenshaw School and the first Headteacher to be appointed without any background in teaching (having previously been a School Business Manager). Prior to her appointment as Headteacher, Mrs Saw shared Associate Headship, for several months, with the current Deputy Headteacher Mr. Richard Andrew.[4]

Steve Turner was Headteacher at Audenshaw from Easter 2005 to Jan 2012, when he retired, he had previously been headteacher at Golborne High School. Under Turner, Audenshaw was deemed to be 'Outstanding' by Ofsted in 2006.[5]This was shortly after he had taken over from Mr Crompton, who (Mr Crompton) was widely regarded as one of the best Headteachers of his generation.

Alan Crompton was headteacher from 1994 to 2005, when he retired and was succeeded by Steve Turner. In 1999, Audenshaw School won the inaugural – and only – schools' series of Channel 4's daytime quiz show Fifteen to One.[6] During Crompton's tenure the school twice received "outstanding" ratings in reports by the Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted), taking it into the "best of the best" list published by Ofsted in 2004. However, In 2007, it was one of the 200 schools in England with the lowest staying-on rate for further education, when only 26.4% of year 11 pupils entered the sixth form.[7] On 10 October 2007, the school celebrated its 75th anniversary and invited Anne, Princess Royal to tour the new cadet facilities and officially "open" the Sixth Form. She also planted the first of 75 celebratory trees in the presence of the entire student body.

History[edit]

On 29 July 1932, Audenshaw Grammar School for Boys was opened, providing facilities for 300 pupils.[8][9] The first headteacher was John Lord, who was in charge until 1955. He was followed by Ronald Porter (1955–1961), then Kenneth Exley (1961–1979).[10]

In the early-1970s pupils of Audenshaw Grammar School formed a Canal Restoration Society with the objective of cleaning, restoring and reopening the then derelict Ashton Canal. Successful in their aim, the canal was reopened on 13 May 1974 by Denis Howel, then Member of Parliament for Birmingham Small Heath and the Minister for Sport.[11]

In 1981 Graham Locke succeeded Exley as headteacher and in 1989, Audenshaw became one of the first Grant Maintained (GM) schools in England.[12] The parents voted for the maintenance – 86% of those eligible voted; 91% of them voting in favour of the school receiving grant maintenance.[13] Locke was headteacher until 1994 and the school's sports hall is named after him. Terry Hall has been the Chair of Governors since 1988. Locke was appointed to the Order of the British Empire for his role in making Audenshaw a grant-maintained school and for services to the community and Hall was made an MBE in 1997 for services to education.[10] Along with Graham Locke, Hall led the school to GM status and more recently to Foundation status. He is the founder Member of the Grant Maintained Standing Advisory Committee (GMSAC).

Alan Crompton was headteacher from 1994 to 2005, when he retired and was succeeded by the current headteacher. In 1999, Audenshaw School won the inaugural – and only – schools' series of Channel 4's daytime quiz show Fifteen to One.[6] During Crompton's tenure the school twice received "outstanding" ratings in reports by the Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted), taking it into the "best of the best" list published by Ofsted in 2004. Following Mrs Saw's appointment as Headteacher, it was rated as 'Requires Improvement' by Ofsted in November 2013. The School was re-inspected by Ofsted in October 2014 and was rated as 'Inadequate'. In 2007, it was one of the 200 schools in England with the lowest staying-on rate for further education, when only 26.4% of year 11 pupils entered the sixth form.[7] On 10 October 2007, the school celebrated its 75th anniversary and invited Anne, Princess Royal to tour the new cadet facilities and officially "open" the Sixth Form. She also planted the first of 75 celebratory trees in the presence of the entire student body.

Audenshaw is no longer a grammar school. There are about 1,100 boys and over 100 girls (in the sixth form).

Audenshaw School was granted Academy Status by the Secretary of State for Education on 1 September 2010. The school is one of only 32 schools who were given permission to convert by the start of the new academic year.

Results[edit]

In 2009, the Tameside Local Education Authority was ranked 117th out of 148 in the country – and 8th out of Greater Manchester's 10 LEAs – based on the percentage of pupils attaining at least 5 A*–C grades at General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) including maths and English (41.8% compared with the national average of 47.6%).[14] In 2008, Audenshaw was the most successful school in the borough, with 64% of its pupils achieving at least five GCSEs A*–C, ahead of the second-place St Thomas More RC College with 59%.[15] The same year, Audenshaw School also led the field in terms of A-level results of Tameside's three schools providing sixth form education; Audenshaw had an average of 1004.9 points per pupil, nearly 250 points ahead of the second-place Ashton Sixth Form College.[16] The 2008 results put Audenshaw School in the top echelon of English schools.[17]

The 2011/12 (72%) 2012/13 (68%) and 2013/2014 (62%) show a three year decline which the governing body has been unable to stem (Ofsted Report, October 2014).

Year 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
Students with 5+ GCSE at A*–C
including Maths and English
66% 64% 64% 64% 57% 64%
Source: BBC Online

Noted alumni[edit]

Sporting
Other

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Audenshaw School, retrieved 2013-07-01 
  2. ^ Sixth Form, audenshawschool.org.uk, retrieved 2009-09-02 
  3. ^ http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/provider/files/2299361/urn/136273.pdf, retrieved 2009-09-02  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. ^ Andrew, Audenshaw, retrieved 2014-01-31 
  5. ^ Ofsted, ofsted, retrieved 2009-09-02 
  6. ^ a b Fifteen-to-One – Schools 01, Quizplayers.com, retrieved 2009-09-02 
  7. ^ a b House of Commons Hansard Written Answers for 15 Oct 2007 (pt 0028), Parliament.uk, 15 October 2007, retrieved 2009-09-02 
  8. ^ a b c d Tameside Metropolitan Borough Council, Facts about Audenshaw, Tameside.gov.uk, retrieved 2009-09-03 
  9. ^ The 1930s, Tameside Advertiser, 9 October 2003, retrieved 2009-09-02 
  10. ^ a b c Audenshaw School: History, AudenshawSchool.com, retrieved 2009-09-02 
  11. ^ Frangopulo 1977, p. 50.
  12. ^ Audenshaw School, AudenshawSchool.org.uk, retrieved 2009-09-02 
  13. ^ House of Commons Hansard Debates for 13 Nov 1991, Parliament.uk, 13 November 1991, retrieved 2009-09-02 
  14. ^ How different areas performed, BBC News, 15 January 2009, retrieved 2009-09-02 
  15. ^ Secondary schools in Tameside, BBC News, 15 January 2009, retrieved 2009-09-02 
  16. ^ Secondary schools in Tameside, BBC News, 15 January 2009, retrieved 2009-09-02 
  17. ^ Top A-level results, BBC News, 15 January 2009, retrieved 2009-09-02 
  18. ^ School Rugby: Sharks give Audenshaw School 'Insider' track (84), rfutouchline.com, November 2006, retrieved 2011-03-28 
  19. ^ Ostick, Chris (9 July 2010), Lancs in five-wicket victory over Yorks, Manchester Evening News, retrieved 2010-07-10 
  20. ^ Mark Hunter, Liberal Democrats, retrieved 2009-09-03 
  21. ^ "Sir Ralph Riley", The Guardian (guardian.co.uk), 13 October 1999, retrieved 2009-09-03 
  22. ^ "I am IMDb: The millionaire film geek from Denton behind the world's top movie website", The Manchester Evening 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Frangopulo, Nicholas Joseph (1977), Tradition in Action: The Historical Evolution of the Greater Manchester County, Wakefield: EP, ISBN 0-7158-1203-3 

External links[edit]