Audi Type T

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Audi Type T
Audi Typ T.jpg
Overview
Manufacturer Audi
Also called Audi Dresden
Audi 15 / 75
Production 1931-1932
Assembly Germany
Powertrain
Engine 3838 cc 8-cylinder
(design Rickenbacker)
Dimensions
Wheelbase 3,100 mm (120 in)
Length 4,480 mm (176 in)
Width 1,780 mm (70 in)
Height 1,760 mm (69 in)

The Audi Type T was a large, 6-cylinder-powered sedan/saloon car introduced by Audi in 1931. It was in most respects a scaled-down version of the manufacturer's Type SS "Zwickau", which had appeared two years earlier.[1]

Jørgen Skafte Rasmussen, the Danish-born entrepreneurial industrialist who had purchased Audi-Werke in 1928, had previously, in 1927, purchased the manufacturing plant of the bankrupt Detroit-based Rickenbacker business and shipped it home to Germany. He installed it in a factory he owned just outside Zschopau, near to Audi's own Zwickau plant. The plan was to build large, relatively inexpensive US-style engines for sales to other German auto-makers. The plan failed in that Rasmussen failed to secure any orders for the engines, so he instead produced two models of his own which used engines produced using the Rickenbacker plant. The Audi Type T (Zwickau) was the second and smaller of these.[2]

The vehicle had a six-cylinder engine with 3,838 cc of displacement. It developed a maximum output of 75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp) at 3,200 rpm, which was conveyed to the rear wheel through a four-speed manual transmission controlled using a central floor-mounted lever.[3]

The car had two leaf-sprung solid axles and four-wheel hydraulic brakes. It was available as four-door "Limousine" (sedan) or two-door convertible. 76 were made.

Specifications[edit]

Production 1931-1932
Engine 6-cylinder, 4-stroke
Bore x stroke 82.55 mm (3.3 in) x 120.65 mm (4.8 in)
Capacity 3838 cc
Power 75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp)
Top speed 100 km/h (62 mph)
Empty weight 1,800 kg (3,968 lb) (chassis)
Electrical 12-volt
Wheelbase 3,100 mm (122.0 in)
Track front/rear 1,440 mm (56.7 in) / 1,480 mm (58.3 in)

Sources[edit]

  • Oswald, Werner: Deutsche Autos 1920–1945, Motorbuch Verlag Stuttgart, 10. Auflage (1996 edition), ISBN 3-87943-519-7
  • Oswald, Werner (2001). Deutsche Autos 1920–1945, Band (vol) 2 (in German). Motorbuch Verlag. ISBN 3-613-02170-6. 
  1. ^ Oswald, pp. 42 & 45
  2. ^ Oswald, p. 42
  3. ^ Oswald, p. 45