Augie Auer

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August H. "Augie" Auer Jr (10 June 1940 – 10 June 2007[1]) was an atmospheric scientist and meteorologist in New Zealand.

As a boy growing up in St. Louis, Missouri, Auer was reportedly fascinated by weather. After a freak winter storm caused havoc in his home town, he decided to become a meteorologist. He studied meteorology at Colorado State University before getting a job at the University of Wyoming.[2]

Auer was a Professor of Atmospheric Science at the University of Wyoming for 22 years.[3] A land use typing method to classify land as urban or rural, based on work he published in 1978, is used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and by the Jamaican National Environment and Planning Agency.[4] His most frequently cited research paper involves ice crystals in clouds.[5]

In 1990, Auer emigrated to New Zealand, becoming Chief Meteorologist for the Meteorological Service of New Zealand Limited from 1990 to 1998.[3] He also presented the weather forecast on TV3 News for several years, often preferring to use colloquialisms instead of technical jargon. Auer was frequently quoted in the New Zealand press regarding weather and climate issues,[6] and was regarded in New Zealand as a "well-known and colourful meteorologist".[7]

In 2006, he helped found the New Zealand Climate Science Coalition in order to argue against claims for man-made global warming,[8][9] leading the MetService to publicly disavow the views of their former Chief Meteorologist.[10] Following the transfer of "climate science" issues from the then New Zealand Meteorological Service into the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) in 1992, Augie become critical of its statements, including those of former associate Jim Salinger.[11]

In a 19 May 2007 interview with The Timaru Herald newspaper, Auer said a combination of misinterpreted and misguided science, media hype, and political spin had created the current hysteria and it was time to put a stop to it, adding "It is time to attack the myth of global warming." According to Auer:

On 10 June 2007, Auer died suddenly while dining with family in Melbourne, Australia, while celebrating his 35th wedding anniversary and his 67th birthday.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Weatherman Augie Auer dies in Melbourne". The New Zealand Herald. 2007-06-11. Retrieved 2007-06-11. 
  2. ^ Falconer, Phoebe (16 June 2007). "Obituary: Augie Auer". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 17 September 2011. 
  3. ^ a b Speakers New Zealand Presents - Augie Auer.
  4. ^ Revision to the Guideline on Air Quality Models: Adoption of a Preferred Long Range Transport Model and Other Revisions, Federal Register 68(72), Apr. 15, 2003. Natural Resources Conservation Authority Ambient Air Quality Guideline Document, Nov. 2006. The Jamaican report writes that Auer's method for distinguishing between urban and rural land usage is preferable to other methods in applications involving dispersion of pollution because it is "directly related to the surface characteristics of the affected area that affect dispersion rates" (p. 5–16).
  5. ^ Auer, August H., Jr.; Veal, Donald L. (1970). "The Dimension of Ice Crystals in Natural Clouds". Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 27 (6): 919–926. doi:10.1175/1520-0469(1970)027<0919:TDOICI>2.0.CO;2. ISSN 1520-0469.  96 citations in Google Scholar.
  6. ^ Google news archive search for "Augie Auer"
  7. ^ "Climate-change debate taking a new direction", Hawke's Bay Today, May 11, 2006.
  8. ^ "Group rejects 'unfounded' global warming claims". The New Zealand Herald. 1 May 2006. Retrieved 17 September 2011. 
  9. ^ "New science coalition to challenge global warming". National Business Review. 1 May 2006. Retrieved 17 September 2011. 
  10. ^ "MetService keen to leave Augie out in the warm". The New Zealand Herald. 20 December 2006. Retrieved 17 September 2011. 
  11. ^ Call for NIWA to be disbanded, Press Release: New Zealand Climate Science Coalition, Sunday, 1 April 2007, 3:14 pm, retrieved 25 April 2009.
  12. ^ "Global warming debunked". The Timaru Herald. 2007-05-19. Archived from the original on 2 June 2007. Retrieved 2007-06-11. [dead link]
  13. ^ "Controversial weatherman Augie Auer dies". stuff.co.nz. 2007-06-11. Archived from the original on 12 June 2007. Retrieved 2007-06-11. [dead link]

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