Augsburg Confession Variata

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The Altered Augsburg Confession (Lat. Confessio Augustana Variata) is a later version of the Lutheran Augsburg Confession that includes substantial changes in the teaching of holy communion and the presence of Christ in bread and wine.

Philipp Melanchthon made several changes during the years to the original Augsburg Confession of 1530. Most of the changes are about the language of the confession. In 1540 and 1542, he, however, rewrote some parts of the confession in order to reconcile with Calvinists and John Calvin himself did sign the 1540 version of the confession. The most important difference is in the theology of Real Presence. The Unaltered Augsburg Confession states:

  • "Concerning the Lord's Supper, they teach that the body and blood of Christ are truly present, and are distributed (communicated) to those that eat in the Lord's Supper. And they disapprove of those that teach otherwise."

Altered Augsburg Confession states:

  • "Concerning the Lord's Supper, they teach that 'with' bread and wine are truly exhibited the body and blood of Christ to those that eat in the Lord's Supper."

Lutheran churches often specify that they agree to the Unaltered Augsburg Confession as opposed to the altered version.

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