Augustin Hadelich

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Augustin Hadelich
Augustin Hadelich.jpg
Background information
Born (1984-04-04) April 4, 1984 (age 30)
Cecina, Italy
Genres Classical
Occupations Violinist
Instruments Ex-Kiesewetter 1723 Stradivarius
Labels AVIE, Naxos
Website augustin-hadelich.com

Augustin Hadelich (born April 4, 1984 in Italy) is a German classical violinist.

Biography[edit]

Augustin Hadelich was born in Cecina, Italy, to German parents. He started playing the violin at the age of 5. His two older brothers were already playing cello and piano at the time.[1] Augustin Hadelich's early teachers included his father, as well as Uto Ughi, Christoph Poppen, Igor Ozim, and Norbert Brainin.[2] He holds a diploma (summa cum laude) from the Istituto Mascagni in Livorno, Italy, as well as a Graduate Diploma and an Artist Diploma from The Juilliard School, where he was a student of Joel Smirnoff.

In 1999, when Augustin Hadelich was fifteen years old, a fire on his family's farm in Italy severely burned his upper body. He stopped playing for almost a year and started to perform again in 2001. [3]

Augustin Hadelich lives in New York City.

Career[edit]

In July 2010, Augustin Hadelich made his New York Philharmonic Debut at the Bravo! Vail Valley Music Festival playing the Mendelssohn concerto. About the performance, the Denver Post wrote: “[Mr. Hadelich] wowed the capacity audience…with his self-assured, technically fluent and musically sensitive approach. And when he breezily performed Paganini’s Caprice No. 17 as an encore, he easily confirmed his place on the shortlist of today’s top violin virtuosos…” (full review) He was immediately re-engaged by the New York Philharmonic to play in Vail in 2011 and to make his subscription debut at Lincoln Center in October 2012. After his debut with the Boston Symphony at Tanglewood in August 2012, Augustin Hadelich was invited to make his Boston Symphony subscription debut in September 2013, performing Brahms Double Concerto with cellist Alban Gerhardt and conductor Christoph von Dohnányi.

In January 2014, he stepped in for an ailing Christian Tetzlaff to make his Disney Hall subscription debut performing the Beethoven violin concerto with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and Edo de Waart conducting. The Los Angeles Times review stated that Hadelich "made the Beethoven concerto sing. His shaping of the opening passage startled with its silvery tone, pinpoint intonation and surprising turns of phrase — and there was not a note thereafter that was not thought out, characterized and beautifully projected." and went on to say "There is a succinct word for a performance like this, "masterly".[4] Other important debuts in the 2013-14 season include the Philadelphia Orchestra, Detroit Symphony, Oregon Symphony, and, in the UK, the Bournemouth and Royal Scottish National Orchestra. Recent seasons have included debuts with the symphony orchestras of Atlanta, Baltimore, Buffalo, Cincinnati, Dallas, Houston, National (Washington D. C.), New Jersey, Saint Louis, San Francisco, Seattle, Toronto and Vancouver, as well as the Los Angeles and Saint Paul Chamber Orchestras. In addition to Tanglewood and Bravo! Vail Valley, festival appearances in the United States include Aspen, Blossom and Chautauqua, where he made his American debut in 2001 and the Eastern Music Festival.

On August 30, 2009, Augustin Hadelich made his debut with the Cleveland Orchestra, playing Lalo's Symphonie Espagnole with the conductor Giancarlo Guerrero (review), and was immediately re-invited to perform with the Cleveland Orchestra in Miami in 2011.

In 2010, Alex Ross wrote in the New Yorker Magazine: "Hadelich, who is twenty-five, has all the fast-fingered brilliance that modern conservatory culture requires; the musicality and the freewheeling fantasy that he brings to bear, though, cannot be taught... Here is a young artist with no evident limitations".[5] The Washington Post wrote in 2011: "...the essence of Hadelich’s playing is beauty: reveling in the myriad ways of making a phrase come alive on the violin, delivering the musical message with no technical impediments whatsoever, and thereby revealing something from a plane beyond ours. This was the best recital I’ve heard this season."[6]

International appearances include the Badische Staatskapelle/Karlsruhe, Deutsche Radio Philharmonie, Dresden Philharmonic, SWR Orchestra/Stuttgart, Helsinki Philharmonic, Netherlands Philharmonic, Orchestre Philharmonique de Monte-Carlo, Orchestre Philharmonique de Strasbourg, Orquesta Sinfónica Nacional de México, Orquestra Sinfônica do Estado de São Paulo, RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra/Dublin, Tokyo Symphony, and chamber orchestras in Budapest, Cologne, Hamburg, Lucerne and Stuttgart, among others. He has collaborated with such renowned conductors as Roberto Abbado, Teddy Abrams, Herbert Blomstedt, Lionel Bringuier, Justin Brown, James Conlon, Christoph von Dohnányi, JoAnn Falletta, Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Alan Gilbert, Hans Graf, Giancarlo Guerrero, Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Jakub Hrusa, Yakov Kreizberg, Jahja Ling, Hannu Lintu, Jun Märkl, Sir Neville Marriner, Fabio Mechetti, Juanjo Mena, Yehudi Menuhin, Andrés Orozco-Estrada, Peter Oundjian, Vasily Petrenko, Christoph Poppen, Carlos Miguel Prieto, Larry Rachleff, Michael Stern, Yan Pascal Tortelier, Bramwell Tovey, Mario Venzago and Jaap van Zweden.

Augustin Hadelich has given recitals at Carnegie Hall, at the Frick Collection in New York (NY Times review), Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C (Washington Post review), the Chamber Music Societies of Detroit and Philadelphia, the Vancouver Recital Society, at the Louvre in Paris, and at Kioi Hall in Tokyo, to name a few. As chamber musician, he has been a participant at the La Jolla, Hong Kong, Marlboro, Ravinia, and Seattle festivals, in addition to a collaboration with Midori at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater.

Special projects in the 2013-14 season include Tango Song and Dance, a multimedia recital project with pianist Joyce Yang and guitarist Pablo Sáinz Villegas, which will premiere at the Kennedy Center on April 21, 2014; as well as the world premiere of Mystery Sonatas, a new work for solo violin by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer David Lang, commissioned by Carnegie Hall and to be performed there on April 29, 2014.

Awards[edit]

Augustin Hadelich was the Gold medalist at the 2006 International Violin Competition of Indianapolis, where he also received the special prizes for the best performance of a Romantic concerto, Classical concerto, Beethoven sonata, violin sonata other than Beethoven, Bach work, commissioned work, encore piece and Paganini caprice. Other awards include an Avery Fisher Career Grant (2009), a Borletti-Buitoni Trust Fellowship (2011), and Lincoln Center’s Martin E. Segal Award (2012).

Discography[edit]

Augustin Hadelich has recorded four highly acclaimed CDs for AVIE. Flying Solo, featuring solo violin works by Bartók, Paganini, Ysaÿe and Bernd Alois Zimmermann, was released in October 2009 and chosen by The New Yorker’s Alex Ross as his CD of the Week;[7] Echoes of Paris, featuring works for violin and piano by Debussy, Poulenc, Prokofiev and Stravinsky, was released in February 2011, and received an Editor’s Choice from Gramophone magazine;[8] Histoire du Tango, featuring works for violin and guitar with the spanish guitarist Pablo Sáinz Villegas by De Falla, Paganini, Piazzolla and Sarasate, was released in March 2013 and has been praised by National Public Radio.[9] In June 2013, Augustin recorded the concertos of Sibelius and Thomas Adès with Hannu Lintu and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, scheduled for release on AVIE in March 2014. He also recorded two CDs for Naxos in 2007: Haydn’s complete violin concertos with the Cologne Chamber Orchestra, and Telemann’s complete fantasies for solo violin.

Instrument[edit]

Augustin Hadelich plays on the 1723 “Ex-Kiesewetter” Stradivari violin, on loan from Clement and Karen Arrison through the Stradivari Society of Chicago. From October 2006 until August 2010 he played on the 1683 "ex-Gingold" Stradivari, which was on loan to him from the Indianapolis Competition.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]