Augustus Frank

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Augustus Frank
Augustus Frank.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 29th district
In office
March 4, 1863 – March 3, 1865
Preceded by Alfred Ely
Succeeded by Burt Van Horn
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 30th district
In office
March 4, 1859 – March 3, 1863
Preceded by Judson W. Sherman
Succeeded by John Ganson
Personal details
Born (1826-07-17)July 17, 1826
Warsaw, New York, U.S.
Died April 29, 1895(1895-04-29) (aged 68)
New York City, U.S.
Resting place Warsaw Town Cemetery
Warsaw, New York
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Agnes McNair Frank
Relations George Washington Patterson
William Patterson
Children William Augustus
Mary Louise Frank
Parents Augustus Frank
Jane (Patterson) Frank
Profession Merchant
Railroad Executive
Banker
Politician

Augustus Frank (July 17, 1826 – April 29, 1895) was an American merchant, railroad executive, banker and politician. He served as a United States Representative from the U.S. state of New York during the American Civil War.

Early life[edit]

Augustus Frank House in Warsaw, NY

Frank was bown in Warsaw, Wyoming County, the son of Augustus and Jane (Patterson) Frank.[1] He attended the common schools and engaged in mercantile pursuits.[2]

Career[edit]

In 1856, he was a delegate to the Republican National Convention. He was elected and served three terms as a Republican Congressman from New York, serving from March 4, 1859, to March 3, 1865, in the 36th, 37th, and 38th Congresses. He was not a candidate for renomination in 1864. He was instrumental in the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment which abolished slavery.[3][4]

After his final term in Congress, Frank became the director of the Wyoming County National Bank in 1865. In 1867 and 1868, he was a member of the New York constitutional convention. From 1870 to 1872, Frank was one of the managers of the Buffalo State Asylum for the Insane in Buffalo, New York. He organized the Bank of Warsaw in 1871 and served as its president until his death in 1895.[5]

Frank was the director and vice president of the Buffalo and New York City Railroad Company in 1887-1893, [6][7][8] and was also director of the Rochester Trust and Safe Deposit Company. In 1894, he was a delegate at large to the State constitutional convention.[9][10] Frank was State commissioner for the preservation of public parks and was a member of the board of directors of the Buffalo, Rochester and Pittsburgh Railroad.[11]

He died in New York City on April 29, 1895, and is interred in Warsaw Cemetery in Warsaw, New York.[12][13]

Family life[edit]

In 1867, Frank married Agnes McNair. The couple had two children, William Augustus and Mary Louise Frank. Their son died in infancy.[14]

Frank was the nephew of two other U.S. Representatives, William Patterson[15] and George Washington Patterson.[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Biographical Review Publishing Company (1895). Biographical Review; this Volume Contains Biographical Sketches of Leading Citizens of Livingston and Wyoming Counties, New York. Biographical Review Publishing Company. p. 659. 
  2. ^ W. E. Morrison (1880). History of Wyoming County, N.Y.: With Illustrations, Biographical Sketches, and Portraits of Some Pioneers and Prominent Residents. W. E. Morrison. p. 288. 
  3. ^ Warsaw Centennial Association (1903). History of the Centennial Celebration, Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, June 28-July 2, 1903. Western New-Yorker. p. 181. 
  4. ^ "Frank House". University of Nebraska Kearney. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  5. ^ Warsaw Centennial Association (1903). History of the Centennial Celebration, Warsaw, Wyoming County, New York, June 28-July 2, 1903. Western New-Yorker. p. 181. 
  6. ^ New York (State). Board of Railroad Commissioners (1888). Annual Report, Volume 2. New York (State). Board of Railroad Commissioners. p. 154. 
  7. ^ New York (State). Board of Railroad Commissioners (1893). Annual Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners of the State of New York for the Fiscal Year Ending. Weed, Parsons and Company. p. 138. 
  8. ^ New York (State) Board of Railroad Commissioners (1894). Report, Volume 2. New York (State) Board of Railroad Commissioners. p. 140. 
  9. ^ Peck, William Farley (1908). History of Rochester and Monroe County, New York: From the Earliest Historic Times to the Beginning of 1907, Volume 1. Pioneer publishing Company. p. 209. 
  10. ^ New York (State). Constitutional Convention and, Choate, Joseph Hodges (1895). Journal of the Constitutional Convention of the State of New York. 1894. Argus Company, printers. p. 11. 
  11. ^ "Biographical Sketches of all of the Senators and Congressmen who Voted for the 13th Amendment". Seth Keller. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  12. ^ "The Abolitionist Tour". Warsaw History. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  13. ^ Spencer, Thomas E. (1998). Where They're Buried: A Directory Containing More Than Twenty Thousand Names of Notable Persons Buried in American Cemeteries, with Listings of Many Prominent People who Were Cremated. Genealogical Publishing Com. p. 239. 
  14. ^ Morrison, W. E. (1880). History of Wyoming County, N.Y.: With Illustrations, Biographical Sketches, and Portraits of Some Pioneers and Prominent Residents. W. E. Morrison. p. 288. 
  15. ^ "PATTERSON, William, (1789 - 1838)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
  16. ^ "PATTERSON, George Washington, (1799 - 1879)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 

External links[edit]


United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Judson W. Sherman
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 30th congressional district

1859–1863
Succeeded by
John Ganson
Preceded by
Alfred Ely
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 29th congressional district

1863–1865
Succeeded by
Burt Van Horn