Ausar Auset Society

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Ausar Auset Society
Formation 1973
Type Religious / Spiritual
Headquarters Brooklyn, New York, USA
Shekhem Ur Shekhem
Ra Un Nefer Amen

The Ausar Auset Society is a Pan-African religious organization founded in 1973 by Ra Un Nefer Amen for the purpose of providing members a societal framework through which the Kemetic spiritual way of life can be lived [1] and to promote Rosicrucian values. [2] [3]

It is based in Brooklyn, New York, with chapters in several major cities in the United States as well as international chapters in London, England, Toronto, Canada and Bermuda, West Indies. The organization provides afrocentric-based spiritual training to the African American community in particular and to the African diaspora in general. The religion uses elements of Ancient Egyptian religion such as the Tree of Life (Paut Neteru) as the basis of its cosmogony and philosophical underpinning.

Organizational structure[edit]

Each Ausar Auset Society branch or study group (Hesp/Nome) replicates the society's structure established by Ra Un Nefer Amen in New York and falls under the leadership of either a Paramount King, Paramount Queen Mother, or Chief(tess) who has his/her own hierarchy of officials and autonomy over their respective region.

Ausarian religion[edit]

According to the Ausarian theology of ancient Egypt, the symbol for realizing the divine potential is Ausar (known in English by the Greek name Osiris). A means through which this realization can be achieved is through meditation which is symbolized by Auset (Isis). These principles are embodied in the story of Ausar. In the story, the Supreme Being manifested itself in the world as Ausar, who rules through adherence to the divine law of Ma'at. Ausar’s younger brother Set becomes jealous and murders him, cuts his body into several pieces and usurps the throne. Ausar’s devoted wife Auset gathers the parts of her husband’s dis-membered body and magically conceives their son, Heru (Horus). Heru eventually overthrows his evil uncle Set with the aid of Tehuti (the deity representing Wisdom) and reclaims the throne, and thereafter rules the land of the living while Ausar rules the land of the deceased (underworld). A version of the story can be found in The Egyptian Book of the Dead. There is also a version of the story in Awakening of Osiris: The Egyptian Book of the Dead. The Egyptian Book of the Dead, along with The Ancient Egyptian Pyramid Texts and the Book of Knowing the Creations of Ra and Overthrowing Apep form the scriptural frame of reference for Ausar Auset Society teachings.

Central to the Ausarian religious system are the 11 Divine Laws which have been extrapolated from the Tree of Life. A full explanation and analysis of each of these Laws can be found in Amen's book Ma'at, The 11 Laws of God. An important theme of this book is that the essence of these 11 Laws must be programmed into the Spirit of the individual through specific meditation techniques. Impressing these Laws upon the spirit will ensure that an individual's identity is with his or her true Self when he or she is confronted with a challenging situation rather than with the false self-image that gives control over to the emotions.

A proper understanding for the cultivation of the 11 Laws consists of the following:[4]

  1. All activities in the universe are carried out by energy.
  2. The Spirit is the energy component of God and all beings.
  3. Energy everywhere in the universe is governed by laws, as proven by science.
  4. As an entity of energy, Man’s Spirit which is in charge of the realization of all events in her/his life—physiological and social—is controlled by laws.
  5. God’s and Man’s Spirit carries out all activities in the world through 11 modalities (faculties) of energy.
  6. Each of the 11 modalities of energy is regulated by its own law.
  7. These laws, which are stored in the Divine division of Man’s Spirit, must be transferred into the mind to guide the Life-Force.
  8. As a result, success, health, and the treasures of a spiritual life can be acquired.

Another important concept that is integral to the teachings of Ausar Auset Society is that Man's entire Being is a composite made up of the Self and the Not-Self, as both are required in order to exist in the physical world. An individual's true identity, however, is the Self which consists of Consciousness and Will (Not-Self consists of Energy and Matter) as there is no energy or matter in Man's true Self. Since Spirit is considered Not-Self, Man's true Self cannot be Spirit. Also, every thought, emotion and sensation belongs to the Not-Self and generally represents a manifestation of the Animal Spirit in Man. The Animal Spirit, along with the Mental Spirit and the Divine Spirit, represents a triune view of Man's Being. The Divine Spirit, which is pre-programmed with Divine Law, corresponds to Man's true Self while both the Mental Spirit (Man's intellect and reasoning ability) and the Animal Spirit correspond to the Not-Self. Therefore, failure to control one's emotions, for example, represents a submission to the animal part of Being as well as a waste of one's Life Force.

Some publications[edit]

  • Amen, Ra Un Nefer, Harlem River Arrangement: The I Ching Transcripts, 1984
  • Amen, Ra Un Nefer, Metu Neter Vol. 1, 1990
  • Amen, Ra Un Nefer, Ma'at, The 11 Laws of God, 2003
  • Amen, Ra Un Nefer, Meditation Fundamentals Software, 2007
  • Amen, Ra Un Nefer, Nuk Au Neter: The Kamitic Holy Scriptures, 2008
  • Living Legacy DVD: The History of the Ausar Auset Society, 2009

References[edit]

  1. ^ Asante & Mazama (2005). Encyclopedia of Black Studies. Sage Publications. p. 104. 
  2. ^ Reynolds, John Lawrence (2006). Secret societies: inside the world's most notorious organizations. Arcade Publishing. p. 152. ISBN 978-1-55970-826-5. 
  3. ^ Edwards, Linda (2001). A brief guide to beliefs: ideas, theologies, mysteries, and movements. Westminster John Knox Press. p. 454. ISBN 978-0-664-22259-8. 
  4. ^ Amen (2010). Healing Is In The Spirit. Kamit Media TransVisions. pp. 72–73. 

External links[edit]