Australia national wheelchair rugby team

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Australia AU

Australia

IWRF Ranking 1 (2014)
Coach Brad Dubberley Nov 2006-
Paralympic Games
Appearances 5
Medals Silver medal with cup.svg Silver: 2000 Summer Paralympics
Silver medal with cup.svg Silver: 2008 Summer Paralympics
Gold medal with cup.svg Gold: 2012 Summer Paralympics
World Championships
Appearances 6
Medals Bronze medal with cup.svg Bronze: 2002
Silver medal with cup.svg Silver: 2010
Gold medal with cup.svg Gold: 2014
Appearances
Medals


Wheelchair rugby is a sport with national representation at the Paralympic games. The Australian Team is known as the 'Steelers'.[1]

Australia has competed at every Paralympics Games since the sport gained full Paralympic Medal status at the 2000 Summer Paralympics.[2] The Steelers also competed in the 1996 Summer Paralympics where wheelchair rugby was a demonstration sport.[3] The 'Steelers' defeated Canada at the 2012 London Games to win its first gold medal.[4] In 2014, it won its first World Championship by defeating Canada. In winning the world championship, the Steelers became the second nation in history to hold both the Paralympic and world championship titles concurrently.[5] The Australian Paralympic Committee currently manages the Steelers high performance program.[6]

The sport is not included at the Special Olympics or the Deaflympics.[7]

Wheelchair rugby Atlanta Paralympics (11)
Brad Dubberley Head Coach since 2006.
Brad Dubberley Head Coach since 2006

The game[edit]

The sport is one of the few contact sports available for wheelchair sport athletes and was originally known as "Murderball".[2] It was developed in Canada during the 1970s and made its way to Australia in 1981.[8]

The sport uses a volleyball for the ball and combines elements of basketball, soccer and ice hockey. The game is played on a basketball sized court.[9] Each team has four players on the court at any one time.[2] It has drawn large crowds at events such as the Paralympics.

Athlete classifications[edit]

Wheelchair Rugby is open to athletes with quadriplegia.[10] Athletes competing in wheelchair rugby are classified according to their ability. Players are classified using a points system starting at 0.5 for athletes with the least ability through to 3.5 for athletes with the most ability.[10]

A team can have four players on the court but must not exceed 8 classification points (the combined total of the player's individual classifications).[10]

Paralympic Games[edit]

Performances 1996–2012[edit]

1996 Atlanta[edit]

Australian Wheelchair Rugby team at the 1996 Atlanta Paralympics

Australia represented by:
MenBrett Boylan (2.0), Garry Croker (1.0), Andrew Greenaway (1.5), Rodney Hamilton, David Jacka (0.5), Peter Lock (2.5), Steve Porter (2.5), Baden Whitehead (2.0) ; Coaches – Darryl Wingard (Head Coach)
. Wheelchair rugby was a demonstration sport at the 1996 Summer Paralympics. George Hucks was a member of the Australian team. During a practice in Atlanta prior to the start of the games, Hucks broke his kneecap. Hucks, from South Australia, was the team's best player. This was a major loss for the team. Hucks was flown home and another player was flown into Australia to replace him. Australia did not win a single match in wheelchair rugby. They lost to New Zealand 23–39, to Great Britain 33–34, to Canada 24–39, to the USA 18–31 and to Sweden 25–29.[11]
Wheelchair rugby at the 1996 Summer Paralympics for detailed results.

2000 Sydney[edit]

Silver medal winning Australian wheelchair rugby "Steelers" at their medal presentation ceremony at the 2000 Sydney Paralympic Games

Australia represented by:

MenBryce Alman (2.0), Brett Boylan (2.0), Cliff Clarke, Garry Croker (1.0), Brad Dubberley (3.5), Nazim Erdem (0.5), Peter Harding, George Hucks (3.0), Tom Kennedy, Craig Parsons, Steve Porter (2.5), Patrick Ryan (2.5) Coaches – Terry Vinyard (Head Coach), Glenn Stephens and Nicholas Bailey (Assistant Coaches) Officials – Kim Elwood (Manager), David Bonavita, Wendy Poole
The team won the silver medal after losing to the World and Paralympic champions, United States by one point in the final.[12][13][14]
Wheelchair rugby at the 2000 Summer Paralympics for detailed results.

2004 Athens[edit]

Australia represented by:
MenBryce Alman (2.0), Ryley Batt (2.5), Grant Boxall (2.5), Brett Boylan (2.0), Brad Dubberley (3.5), Nazim Erdem, George Hucks (3.0), George Kersnovske (2.0), Steve Porter (2.5), Patrick Ryan (2.5), Ryan Scott (0.5), Scott Vitale (1.5) ;Coaches – Terry Vinyard (Head Coach), Glenn Stephens (Assistant Coach) Officials – Kim Ellwood (Manager), Robert Doidge, Maria Spiller
[12]
Australia finished 5th in the tournament.
Wheelchair rugby at the 2004 Summer Paralympics for detailed results.

2008 Beijing[edit]

Australia represented by:
MenBryce Alman (2.0), Ryley Batt (2.5), Grant Boxall (2.5), Shane Brand (1.5), Cameron Carr (2.0), Nazim Erdem (0.5), George Hucks (3.0), Steve Porter (2.5), Ryan Scott (0.5), Greg Smith (2.0), Scott Vitale (2.0); CoachesBrad Dubberley (Head Coach) Officials – Kim Ellwood (Section Manager), Rob Doidge, Noni Shelton, Angela Mansell[12]

Three of the team made their Paralympic debut and Steve Porter attended his fourth Games. The Sttelers won the silver medal losing to the United States 53–44 in the final.[15]
Wheelchair rugby at the 2008 Summer Paralympics for detailed results.

2012 London[edit]

Team co-captains - Cameron Carr and Ryan Scott - interviewed after winning 2012 Team of the Year at the Australian Paralympian of the Year ceremony

Australia represented by:
Men - Nazim Erdem (0.5), Ryan Scott (0.5)(Co-captain), Jason Lees (1.0), Cameron Carr (2.0)(Co-captain), Andrew Harrison (2.0), Greg Smith (2.0), Cody Meakin (2.0), Josh Hose (3.0), Ben Newton (3.0), Ryley Batt (3.5), Chris Bond (3.5) ; CoachesBrad Dubberley (Head Coach); Officials - Paul Kiteley (Section Manager), Chevvy Cooper (Technical Support)), Angela Mansell (Personal Care Assistant),Simon Mole (Physiotherapist)[16]
Six players made their first Paralympic Games appearance:[17] Australia defeated Canada 66-51 to win their first Paralympics gold medal.
Wheelchair rugby at the 2012 Summer Paralympics for detailed results.

World Championships[edit]

Performances 1995–2014[edit]

1995 Nottwil, Switzerland[edit]

Australia represented by:
Men - ?  ; Coaches -

1998 Toronto, Canada[edit]

Australia represented by:
Men - ?  ; Coaches - Darryl Wingard (Head Coach), David Bonavita (Assistant Coach)

2002 Gothenburg, Sweden, Canada[edit]

Australia represented by:
Men - ?  ; Coaches - Terry Vinyard (Head Coach), Glenn Stephens (Assistant Coach)

2006 Christchurch New Zealand[edit]

Australia represented by:
Men - ?  ; Coaches - Evan Bennett (Head Coach)

Ryley Batt is regarded as one of the leading players in the world.
Ryley Batt is regarded as one of the leading players in the world since 2004

2010 Vancouver, Canada[edit]

MenNazim Erdem (0.5), Ryley Batt (3.5), Josh Hose (3.0), Jason Lees (1.0), Bryce Alman (2.0), Ryan Scott (0.5), Steve Porter (2.5), Cameron Carr 2.0, Andrew Harrison (2.0) ; Coaches - Brad Dubberley (Head Coach)

2014 Odense , Denmark[edit]

Australia represented by:
Men Nazim Erdem (0.5), Ryley Batt (3.5), Josh Hose (3.0), Jason Ellery (2.0), Michael Ozanne (0.5), Jason Lees (1.0), Chris Bond (3.5), Ryan Scott (0.5), Curtis Palmer (2.5), Cameron Carr (2.0), Jayden Warn (3.0) ; Coaches - Brad Dubberley (Head Coach), Greg Smith (Assistant Coach) ; Officials Elisha Gartner (Team Manager)

Asia-Oceania Championship[edit]

Performances 2003-2013[edit]

[19]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Australian steelers team named for London 2012". Wheelchair Sports Australia. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c "Wheelchair Rugby". Wheelchair Sports Australia. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  3. ^ Media Guide : London 2012 Paralympic Games. Sydney: Australian Paralympic Committee. 2012. 
  4. ^ "Steelers down Canada to win gold". ABC Online. 10 September 2012. Retrieved 10 September 2012. 
  5. ^ "Australia beats Canada to win Wheelchair Rugby World championships". ABC News. 11 August 2014. Retrieved 23 August 2014. 
  6. ^ "Wheelchair rugby". Australian Paralympic Committee website. Retrieved 27 August 2014. 
  7. ^ Depauw, K. P., & Gavron, S. J. (2005). Disability sport. (p. 141) Lower Mitcham, South Australia: Human Kinetics Publishers.
  8. ^ "Murderball – a great tale of wheelchair rugby". The Roar. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  9. ^ Depauw, K. P., & Gavron, S. J. (2005). Disability sport. (p. 152) Lower Mitcham, South Australia: Human Kinetics Publishers.
  10. ^ a b c "Wheelchair rugby". Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  11. ^ Golden days of Atlanta : Xth Paralympic Games Atlanta, Georgia, August 15–25, 1996. Sydney: Australian Paralympic Federation. 1996. 
  12. ^ a b c Australian Media Guide : 2000 Paralympic Games. Sydney: Australian Paralympic Committee. 2000. 
  13. ^ Annual Report 2000. Sydney: Australian Paralympic Committee. 2000. 
  14. ^ "Australian 2000 Paralympic Team". Pandora WSebsite. Retrieved 17 June 2012. 
  15. ^ "Australian Paralympic Committee Annual Report" (PDF). Australian Paralympic Committee. 2007–2008. Retrieved 13 June 2012. 
  16. ^ Media Guide - 2012 London Paralympic Games. Sydney: Australian Paralympic Committee. 2012. 
  17. ^ "Aussie Wheelchair Rugby team announced for London". Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 30 May 2012. 
  18. ^ "Australia wins first ever IWRF World Championship". Australian Paralympic Committee News. 11 August 2014. Retrieved 27 August 2014. 
  19. ^ "Australia". 2014 IWRF World Championship Wheelchair Rugby website. Retrieved 27 August 2014. 

External links[edit]

Australian Paralympic Committee Wheelchair Rugby Program