AACTA Award for Best Film

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Best Film
AACTA Award
Awarded for best Australian film of the year
Country Australia
Presented by Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA)
First awarded 1969
Currently held by The Great Gatsby (2013)
Official website http://www.aacta.org

The AACTA Award for Best Film is an award presented by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA), a non-profit organisation whose aim is to "identify, award, promote and celebrate Australia's greatest achievements in film and television."[1] The award is presented at the annual AACTA Awards, which hand out accolades for achievements in feature film, television, documentaries and short films.[2] From 1969–2010, the category was presented by the Australian Film Institute (AFI), the Academy's parent organisation, at the annual Australian Film Institute Awards (known as the AFI Awards).[3] When the AFI launched the Academy in 2011, it changed the annual ceremony to the AACTA Awards, with the current award being a continuum of the AFI Award for Best Film.[3]

From 1969–1975, the award was presented as a gold, silver, bronze or grand prix prize, or in some years, a cash prize.[4][5] The first winner, Jack and Jill: A Postscript, was nominated in the "general" category of the 1969 awards, and received a silver prize.[6][7] Because non-feature films dominated the Australian film industry at that time, the film was submitted in the general category.[6][7] Despite this, it is considered the first winner by the Academy. From the 1976 Australian Film Awards, the award became competitive, and has been given as such since then.[8]

To be eligible, the film must be Australian; consist of a dramatised story of at least 70 minutes duration; and be publicly exhibited in a commercial cinema for a minimum of seven consecutive days, in at least two capital cities (one of which is Sydney or Melbourne).[9] The producer of the film is considered the nominee, and is presented the award upon winning.[10]

Winners and nominees[edit]

In the following table, the years listed correspond to the year of film release; the ceremonies are usually held the same year.[A] Films in bold and in dark blue background have received a gold, silver, bronze or grand prix prize, or a cash prize; those in bold and in yellow background have won a regular competitive award. Films that are neither highlighted nor in bold are the nominees. When sorted chronologically, the table always lists the winning film first and then the other nominees.[11][12]

Contents
AFI Awards (1969–2010)
AACTA Awards (2011–present)
1960s • 1970s • 1980s • 1990s • 2000s • 2010s
  Winner of a gold, silver or bronze prize (1969–1975)
  Winner of a competitive award (1976–present)
Year Film Producer
AFI Awards
1960s
1969
(11th)
Jack and Jill: A Postscript[B] Phillip Adams and Brian Robinson
1970s
1970
(12th)
Three to Go: Michael[C] Gil Brealey
1971
(13th)
Homesdale[D] Grahame Bond and Richard Brennan
1972
(14th)
Stork[E] Tim Burstall
1973
(15th)
27A[F] Haydn Keenan
1973
(15th)
Libido: The Child[F] Christopher Muir and John B. Murray
197475
(16th and
17th)
Sunday Too Far Away[G] Gil Brealey and Matt Carroll
197475
(16th and
17th)
Petersen[H] Tim Burstall
197475
(16th and
17th)
Between Wars[H] Michael Thornhill
1976
(18th)
The Devil's Playground Fred Schepisi
1976
(18th)
Caddie Anthony Buckley
1976
(18th)
Picnic at Hanging Rock Hal and Jim McElroy
1976
(18th)
Pure Shit Bob Weis
1977
(19th)
Storm Boy Matt Carroll and Jane Scott
1977
(19th)
Break of Day Patricia Lovell
1977
(19th)
Don's Party Phillip Adams
1977
(19th)
The Picture Show Man Joan Long
1978
(20th)
Newsfront David Elfick
1978
(20th)
Mouth to Mouth John Duigan and Jon Sainken
1978
(20th)
Patrick Richard Franklin and Antony I. Ginnane
1978
(20th)
The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith Fred Schepisi
1979
(21st)
My Brilliant Career Margaret Fink
1979
(21st)
Cathy's Child Pom Oliver and Errol Sullivan
1979
(21st)
In Search of Anna Esben Storm
1979
(21st)
Mad Max Byron Kennedy
1980s
1980
(22nd)
Breaker Morant Matt Carroll
1980
(22nd)
Manganinnie Gilda Baracchi
1980
(22nd)
...Maybe This Time Brian Kavanagh
1980
(22nd)
Stir Richard Brennan
1981
(23rd)
Gallipoli Patricia Lovell and Robert Stigwood
1981
(23rd)
The Club Matt Carroll
1981
(23rd)
Winter of Our Dreams Richard Mason
1981
(23rd)
Wrong Side of the Road Graeme Isaac and Ned Lander
1982
(24th)
Lonely Hearts John B. Murray
1982
(24th)
Goodbye Paradise Jane Scott
1982
(24th)
Monkey Grip Patricia Lovell
1982
(24th)
We of the Never Never Greg Tepper and John B. Murray
1983
(25th)
Careful, He Might Hear You Jill Robb
1983
(25th)
Man of Flowers Jane Ballantyne and Paul Cox
1983
(25th)
Phar Lap John Sexton
1983
(25th)
The Year of Living Dangerously Jim McElroy
1984
(26th)
Annie's Coming Out Don Murray
1984
(26th)
My First Wife Jane Ballantyne and Paul Cox
1984
(26th)
Silver City Joan Long
1984
(26th)
Strikebound Miranda Bain, Richard Lowenstein and Timothy White
1985
(27th)
Bliss Anthony Buckley
1985
(27th)
A Street to Die Bill Bennett
1985
(27th)
Fran David Rapsey
1985
(27th)
Unfinished Business Rebel Penfold-Russell
1986
(28th)
Malcolm Margaret Fink
1986
(28th)
Short Changed Ross Matthews
1986
(28th)
The Fringe Dwellers Sue Milliken
1986
(28th)
The More Things Change... Jill Robb
1987
(29th)
The Year My Voice Broke Terry Hayes, George Miller and Doug Mitchell
1987
(29th)
Ground Zero Michael Pattinson
1987
(29th)
High Tide Sandra Levy
1987
(29th)
The Tale of Ruby Rose Bryce Menzies, Andrew Wiseman
1988
(30th)
The Navigator: A Medieval Odyssey David Elfick
1988
(30th)
Boulevard of Broken Dreams Frank Howson, Jacques Khouri and William J. Vass
1988
(30th)
Grievous Bodily Harm Richard Brennan
1988
(30th)
Mull D. Howard Grigsby
1989
(31st)
Evil Angels (A Cry in the Dark)[13] Verity Lambert
1989
(31st)
Dead Calm Terry Hayes, George Miller and Doug Mitchell
1989
(31st)
Ghosts... of the Civil Dead Evan English
1989
(31st)
Island Paul Cox and Santhana K. Naidu
1990s
1990
(32nd)
Flirting Terry Hayes, George Miller and Doug Mitchell
1990
(32nd)
Blood Oath Charles Waterstreet and Denis Whitburn
1990
(32nd)
Struck by Lightning Terry J. Charatsis and Trevor Farrant
1990
(32nd)
The Big Steal Nadia Tass and Davide Parker
1991
(33rd)
Proof Lynda House
1991
(33rd)
Death in Brunswick Timothy White
1991
(33rd)
Dingo Rolf de Heer, Giorgio Draskovic, Marie-Pascale Osterrieth, Marc Rosenberg
1991
(33rd)
Spotswood Richard Brennan and Timothy White
1992
(34th)
Strictly Ballroom Tristram Miall
1992
(34th)
Black Robe Robert Lantos, Sue Milliken and Stéphane Reichel
1992
(34th)
Romper Stomper Ian Pringle and Daniel Scharf
1992
(34th)
The Last Days of Chez Nous Jan Chapman
1993
(35th)
The Piano Jan Chapman
1993
(35th)
Map of the Human Heart Tim Bevan and Vincent Ward
1993
(35th)
On My Own Leo Pescarolo and Elisa Resegotti
1993
(35th)
The Heartbreak Kid Ben Gannon
1994
(36th)
Muriel's Wedding Lynda House and Jocelyn Moorhouse
1994
(36th)
The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert Al Clark, Michael Hamlyn
1994
(36th)
Bad Boy Bubby Rolf de Heer, Domenico Procacci, Giorgio Draskovic
1994
(36th)
The Sum of Us Hal McElroy
1995
(37th)
Angel Baby Jonathan Shteinman and Timothy White
1995
(37th)
All Men Are Liars John Maynard
1995
(37th)
Hotel Sorrento Richard Franklin and Peter Fitzpatrick
1995
(37th)
That Eye, the Sky Hal McElroy
1996
(37th)
Shine Jane Scott
1996
(38th)
Children of the Revolution Tristram Miall
1996
(38th)
Love and Other Catastrophes Helen Bandis, Stavros Kazantzidis and Yael Bergman
1996
(38th)
Mr. Reliable Hal McElroy
1997
(39th)
Kiss or Kill Bill Bennett
1997
(39th)
Blackrock David Elfick, Rick Enright and Melanie Ritchie
1997
(39th)
Doing Time for Patsy Cline Chris Kennedy
1997
(39th)
The Well Sandra Levy
1998
(40th)
The Interview Bill Hughes
1998
(40th)
The Boys Robert Connolly and John Maynard
1998
(40th)
Head On Jane Scott
1998
(40th)
Radiance Ned Lander and Andy Myer
1999
(41st)
Two Hands Marian Macgowan
1999
(41st)
Praise Martha Coleman
1999
(41st)
Siam Sunset Max Dann and Andrew Knight
1999
(41st)
Soft Fruit Helen Bowden
2000s
2000
(42nd)
Looking for Alibrandi Robyn Kershaw
2000
(42nd)
Better Than Sex Frank Cox and Bruna Papandrea
2000
(42nd)
Bootmen Hilary Linstead
2000
(42nd)
Chopper Michele Bennett
2001
(43rd)
Lantana Jan Chapman
2001
(43rd)
The Bank John Maynard
2001
(43rd)
The Dish Santo Cilauro, Tom Gleisner, Michael Hirsh, Jane Kennedy and Rob Sitch
2001
(43rd)
Moulin Rouge! Baz Luhrmann, Fred Baron and Martin Brown
2002
(44th)
Rabbit-Proof Fence Phillip Noyce, Christine Olsen and John Winter
2002
(44th)
Australian Rules Mark Lazarus
2002
(44th)
Beneath Clouds Teresa-Jayne Hanlon
2002
(44th)
The Tracker Julie Ryan and Rolf de Heer
2003
(45th)
Japanese Story Sue Maslin
2003
(45th)
Alexandra's Project Rolf de Heer and Antonio Zeccola
2003
(45th)
Gettin' Square Martin Fabinyi, Timothy White, Trisha Lake
2003
(45th)
The Rage in Placid Lake Marian McGowan
2004
(46th)
Somersault Anthony Anderson and Jan Chapman
2004
(46th)
Love's Brother Jane Scott
2004
(46th)
Old Man Who Read Love Stories Julie Ryan
2004
(46th)
Tom White Daniel Scharf
2005
(47th)
Look Both Ways Bridget Ikin, Barbara Masel and Andrew Myer
2005
(47th)
Little Fish Robert Mullis, Devesh Chetty and Kirk D'amico
2005
(47th)
Oyster Farmer Anthony Buckley and Piers Tempest
2005
(47th)
The Proposition Chris Brown, Jackie O'Sullivan, Chiara Menage and Cat Villiers
2006
(48th)
Ten Canoes Rolf de Heer and Julie Ryan
2006
(48th)
Candy Margaret Fink and Emile Sherman
2006
(48th)
Jindabyne Philippa Bateman, Garry Charny and Catherine Jarman
2006
(48th)
Kenny Clayton Jacobson and Rohan Timlock
2007
(49th)
Romulus, My Father Robert Connolly and John Maynard
2007
(49th)
The Home Song Stories Michael McMahon and Liz Watts
2007
(49th)
Lucky Miles Jo Dyer and Lesley Dyer
2007
(49th)
Noise Trevor Blainey
2008
(50th)
The Black Balloon Tristram Miall and Toni Collette
2008
(50th)
The Jammed Dee McLachlan and Andrea Buck
2008
(50th)
The Square Joel Edgerton, Matthew Dabner
2008
(50th)
Unfinished Sky Cathy Overett and Anton Smit
2009
(51st)
Samson and Delilah Kath Shelper
2009
(51st)
Balibo Anthony LaPaglia, John Maynard, Dominic Purcell and Rebecca Williamson
2009
(51st)
Beautiful Kate Bryan Brown and Leah Churchill-Brown
2009
(51st)
Blessed Al Clark, Barbara Gibbs, Phil Hunt, Marian Macgowan and Compton Ross
2009
(51st)
Mao's Last Dancer Jane Scott
2009
(51st)
Mary and Max Melanie Coombs
2010s
2010
(52nd)
Animal Kingdom Liz Watts
2010
(52nd)
Beneath Hill 60 Bill Leimbach
2010
(52nd)
Bran Nue Dae Robyn Kershaw and Graeme Isaac
2010
(52nd)
Bright Star Jan Chapman and Caroline Hewitt
2010
(52nd)
The Tree Sue Taylor and Yael Fogiel
2010
(52nd)
Tomorrow, When the War Began Andrew Mason and Michael Boughen
AACTA Awards
2011
(1st)
Red Dog Nelson Woss and Julie Ryan
2011
(1st)
The Eye of the Storm Antony Waddington, Gregory J. Read and Fred Schepisi
2011
(1st)
The Hunter Vincent Sheehan
2011
(1st)
Mad Bastards David Jowsey, Alan Pigram, Stephen Pigram and Brendan Fletcher
2011
(1st)
Oranges and Sunshine Camilla Bray, Emile Sherman and Iain Canning
2011
(1st)
Snowtown Anna McLeish and Sarah Shaw
2012
(2nd)
The Sapphires Rosemary Blight and Kylie du Fresne
2012
(2nd)
Burning Man Andy Paterson and Jonathan Teplitzky
2012
(2nd)
Lore Karsten Stöter, Liz Watts, Paul Welsh and Benny Drechsel
2012
(2nd)
Wish You Were Here Angie Fielder
2013
(3rd)
The Great Gatsby Baz Luhrmann, Catherine Martin, Douglas Wick, Lucy Fisher, and Catherine Knapman
2013
(3rd)
Dead Europe Emile Sherman, Iain Canning, and Liz Watts
2013
(3rd)
Mystery Road David Jowsey
2013
(3rd)
The Rocket Sylvia Wilczynski
2013
(3rd)
Satellite Boy David Jowsey, Julie Ryan, and Catriona McKenzie
2013
(3rd)
The Turning Robert Connolly, Maggie Miles, and The Turning Ensemble
2014
(4th)
The Babadook Kristina Ceyton and Kristian Moliere
2014
(4th)
Charlie's Country Nils Erik Nielsen, Peter Djigirr, and Rolf de Heer
2014
(4th)
Predestination Paddy McDonald, Tim McGahan, Peter Spierig, and Michael Spierig
2014
(4th)
The Railway Man Chris Brown, Andy Paterson, and Bill Curbishley
2014
(4th)
Tracks Emile Sherman, and Iain Canning
2014
(4th)
The Water Diviner Andrew Mason, Troy Lum, and Keith Rodger

Notes[edit]

A^ : From 1958–2010, the awards were held during the year of the films release. However, the 1974–75 awards was held in 1975 for films released in 1974 and 1975, and the first AACTA Awards were held in 2012 for films released in 2011.[14][15]
B^ : Jack and Jill: A Postscript received a silver prize, and was nominated in the "general category" in 1969.[16]
C^ : Three to Go: Michael received the Grand Prix award for the film in 1970.[17]
D^ : Homesdale was the winner of the Grand Prix award in 1971, and was the last film to receive this prize.[18]
E^ : Stork was awarded the Australian Film Development Corporation Award for the Best Fiction Film over 65 minutes, and was given a five-thousand dollar cash prize.[19]
F1 2 : Libido: The Child and 27A were joint recipients of the gold prize for fiction in 1973.[20]
G^ : Sunday Too Far Away won the golden reel prize, and an additional A$5000, at the 1974–75 Awards.[21][22]
H1 2 : Although not considered to be nominees, Petersen and Between Wars won the silver and bronze prizes, respectively.[21][22] They are not highlighted in dark blue, in order not to confuse the reader in regards to who the winner is, and in order of precedence gold was always the highest honour, followed by silver then bronze.[4]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "AACTA – The Academy". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  2. ^ "AACTA – The Academy – The Awards". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "AACTA – The Academy – Background". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  4. ^ a b French, Lisa; Poole, Mark (2009). Shining a Light: 50 Years of the Australian Film Institute. Australian Teachers of Media. p. 27. ISBN 1-876467-20-7. 
  5. ^ "IMDb Australian Film Institute Awards". The Internet Movie Database. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  6. ^ a b Staff (3 December 1969). "P.M. Presents Film Awards". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  7. ^ a b French, Lisa; Poole, Mark (2009). Shining a Light: 50 Years of the Australian Film Institute. Australian Teachers of Media. p. 110. ISBN 1-876467-20-7. 
  8. ^ "AACTA – Past Winners: 1969". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  9. ^ "Part2: Rule 5 – Special Conditions for Feature Film". 2013 AACTA Awards Rule Book. Australian Film Institute. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  10. ^ "Part2: Rule 5.4 – Special Rules for Best Film". 2013 AACTA Awards Rule Book. Australian Film Institute. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  11. ^ Winners and nominees by year:
  12. ^ Additional winners and nominees references:
    • French, Lisa; Poole, Mark (2009). Shining a Light: 50 Years of the Australian Film Institute. Australian Teachers of Media. p. 165. ISBN 1-876467-20-7. 
    • French, Lisa; Poole, Mark (2009). Shining a Light: 50 Years of the Australian Film Institute. Australian Teachers of Media. p. 166. ISBN 1-876467-20-7. 
    • French, Lisa; Poole, Mark (2009). Shining a Light: 50 Years of the Australian Film Institute. Australian Teachers of Media. p. 167. ISBN 1-876467-20-7. 
    • French, Lisa; Poole, Mark (2009). Shining a Light: 50 Years of the Australian Film Institute. Australian Teachers of Media. p. 168. ISBN 1-876467-20-7. 
  13. ^ "A Cry in the Dark (1988) – Release dates". IMDb.com. Retrieved 2012-06-15. 
  14. ^ "AACTA – Past Winners – 1970–1979 – 1974–1975". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  15. ^ Bodey, Michael (8 November 2011). "Industry academy announces new awards". The Australian (News Limited (News Corporation)). Retrieved 5 June 2012. 
  16. ^ Staff (3 December 1969). "Film award for life of bullocky". The Age. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  17. ^ "MILESAGO – Awards". Milesago. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  18. ^ "AACTA – Past Winners – 1970–1979 – 1971". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  19. ^ "AACTA – Past Winners – 1970–1979 – 1972". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  20. ^ "AACTA – Past Winners – 1970–1979 – 1973". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  21. ^ a b Staff (24 March 1975). "Shearer feature gets good clip of 'Oscars'". The Age. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 
  22. ^ a b Staff (24 March 1975). "Shearers' strike film wins top Aust award". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 3 June 2012. 

External links[edit]