Australian Motorist Party

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Australian Motorist Party
President Geoff Develin
Chairman Geoff Develin[1]
Spokesperson David Cumbers[2]
Founded June 13, 2008 (2008-06-13)[2]
Headquarters Fyshwick, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia[2]
Website
amp.org.au
Politics of Australia
Political parties
Elections

The Australian Motorist Party (A.M.P.) is an Australian political party dedicated to representing motorist and road users, as well pedestrians, throughout Australia. It was founded by groups of concerned motorists.[3][4]

Policies[edit]

  • Safety of drivers and pedestrians
  • Issues involving young drivers such as education and training.
  • Public transport
  • Cost of driving
  • Fuel taxes and alternative fuel sources

History[edit]

The A.M.P. was formed in May 2007[5] and became an official registered party in 2008.[2] They put forward 6 candidates for the 2008 ACT elections and used a bus equipped with a public address system to promote their new political party.[6] Burl Doble and Geoff Rake ran for seats in Brindabella. Ginninderra had Denis Walford and Andrew Simmington running and Joe Hlubucek and David Cumbers ran in Molonglo.[4] None of the candidates won the seats they were running for on election night, but Walford made a speech to A.M.P. president, Geoff Develin, to stay positive. In the 2012 ACT Elections the party ran candidates in each of the 3 electorates, most notably in Ginninderra, Summernauts organiser Chic Henry contested the seat and secured a sizeable 6.6% of the vote. The party once again, however failed to have any candidates elected. [7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Staff (May 5, 2008). "Liberals Opt for Planning Boss". Journal of Turkish Weekly. International Strategic Research Organization. Retrieved May 27, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d Staff (2012). "Political parties - Register of political parties - Elections ACT". ACT Electoral Commission. ACT Government. Retrieved May 27, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Australian Motorist Party". AMP. Australian Motorist Party. 2010. Retrieved November 19, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b Staff (September 10, 2008). "Motorist party no 'single issue group'". ABC News. Sydney, New South Wales, Australia: Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved November 19, 2011. 
  5. ^ cranky (May 26, 2007). "New Party to contest ACT Election". the-riotact.com. Riot Act. Retrieved May 27, 2012. 
  6. ^ Staff (September 28, 2008). "Motorist Party driving the bus to territory election.". The Canberra Times (Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia: Fairfax Media). OCLC 220340116. Retrieved May 27, 2012. (subscription required)
  7. ^ Staff (October 21, 2008). "Party hails energy and optimism of man in the driving seat.". The Canberra Times (Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia: Fairfax Media). OCLC 220340116. Retrieved May 27, 2012. (subscription required)

External links[edit]