Australian lime

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Finger Lime

Australian limes are species of the plant genus Citrus that are native to Australia. These species were formerly included in the genera Microcitrus and Eremocitrus.[1][2][3] They have been used as a food source by indigenous Australians as well as early settlers and are used in modern Australian cuisine, including marmalade and sauces.[4][5]

Species include:

  • Citrus australasica (Finger Lime), a species from rainforest regions of northern New South Wales and Southern Queensland with elongated yellow-green to purple fruits.
  • Citrus australis (Round Lime or Dooja), a species from south-eastern Australia with round, green fruits
  • Citrus glauca (Desert Lime), from arid inland areas of inland Australia. Small round fruits are produced in summer.

A number of cultivars have been developed in recent years. These can be grafted on to standard citrus rootstocks. They may be grown as ornamental trees in the garden or in containers.[6] Grafted standards are available for some varieties.[1] The cultivars include:

  • 'Australian Outback' (or 'Australian Desert'), developed from several Desert Lime varieties
  • 'Australian Red Centre' (or 'Australian Blood'), a hybrid cross of Finger Lime and mandarin
  • 'Australian Sunrise', a hybrid cross of Finger Lime and a calomondin which is pear shaped and orange inside
  • 'Rainforest Pearl', a pink-fruited form of Finger Lime from Bangalow, New South Wales

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lindsay, Lenore. "Australian Limes". Australian Plants Onlline. Australian Native Plants Society (Australia). Archived from the original on 5 December 2010. Retrieved 2010-11-16. 
  2. ^ "Eremocitrus". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 2010-11-16. 
  3. ^ "Microcitrus". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 2010-11-16. 
  4. ^ "Taming Wild Limes". Ecos Magazine (CSIRO publishing) (107). 2001. 
  5. ^ "Australian native citrus-wild species, cultivars and hybrids". Primary Industries and Resources SA. Retrieved 2010-11-16. 
  6. ^ "From the outback to ‘out the back’". CSIRO. 12 August 2005. Retrieved 2010-11-16.