Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957

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Eurovision Song Contest 1957
Country  Austria
National selection
Selection process Internal Selection
Selected entrant Bob Martin
Selected song "Wohin, kleines Pony?"
Finals performance
Final result 10th, 3 points
Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest
Wiki Eurovision Heart (Infobox).svg 1958►

Austria took part for the first time in the Eurovision Song Contest 1957. The country was represented by Bob Martin with the song "Wohin, kleines Pony?" written by Kurt Svab and Hans Werner.

Before the contest[edit]

Austria actually wanted to take part in the Eurovision Song Contest 1956 but was, like Denmark and the United Kingdom disqualified because no entry was subimitted before the submission deadline. For the 1957 contest, Bob Martin was selected internally to represent his country with the song “Wohin, kleines Pony?” (Where, little pony?), a typical schlager for that time with a cowboy theme.

At Eurovision[edit]

Carl de Groof conducted the song at the Eurovision Song Contest. It was the fifth song presented that tonight following Italy with “Corde della mia chitarra” and proceeding the Netherlands with “Net als toen”. At the close of voting, Austria had received three points in total (two from the United Kingdom and one from the Netherlands) and would be the debuting country in the Eurovision Song Contest to finish last. As only the winner was announced in 1956, Austria is also the first country at all to finish last in the competition. Austria gave six of its ten points to the Netherlands, which marked the second highest vote for the winning country that evening.

Voting[edit]

Every country had a jury of ten people. Every jury member could give one point to his or her favourite song.

Commercial success and critical reception[edit]

Bob Martin has never recorded the song[1] and it was therefore also never released as a single. After the contest, a German newspaper stated that Austria's three points “for this musical confectionery, a mixture of a schmaltzy song and a cowboy song à la Bruce Low were a decent proof that the judges “could not be improved by the random taste of the masses”.[2]

Sources[edit]

  • Jan Feddersen: Ein Lied kann eine Brücke sein, Hoffmann und Campe 2002

References[edit]

  1. ^ Diggiloo Thrush - 1957
  2. ^ Jan Feddersen: Ein Lied kann eine Brücke sein, Hoffmann und Campe 2002, p. 24