Autistic Pride Day

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Autistic Pride Day, an Aspies for Freedom initiative, is a celebration of the neurodiversity of people on the autism spectrum on June 18 each year.[1][dead link] Autistic pride recognises the innate potential in all people, including those on the autism spectrum.

Autistic pride[edit]

In June, the organisations around the world celebrate Autistic Pride Day, with events around the world, to persuade "neuro-typicals", people not on the autism spectrum, that autistic people are "unique individuals" who should not be seen as cases for treatment.[1][dead link]

Autistic pride asserts that autistic people have a unique set of characteristics that provide them many rewards and challenges. Although autism is an expression of neurodiversity, some people promoting Autistic pride[according to whom?] believe that some of the difficulties that they experience are as the result of societal issues. For instance, campaigns to gain funding for autism related organizations promote feelings of pity.[2][not in citation given][3][not in citation given] Researchers and people with high-functioning autism have contributed to a shift in attitudes away from the notion that autism is a deviation from the norm that must be treated or cured, and towards the view that autism is a difference rather than a disability.[4] New Scientist magazine released an article entitled "Autistic and proud" on the first Autistic Pride Day that discussed the idea.[5]

Themes[edit]

  • 2005 Acceptance not cure — main event of 2005 was in Brasília, capital of Brazil.
  • 2006 Celebrate Neurodiversity — main events of 2006 were an Autistic Pride Summer Camp in Germany and an event at the Scienceworks Museum in Melbourne, Australia.
  • 2007 Autistics Speak. It's time to listen
  • 2008 Not known
  • 2009 Not known
  • 2010 Perspectives, not fear
  • 2011 Recognize, Respect, Include

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "What's in store: Autistic Licence". London: Times Online. December 31, 2005. Retrieved 2007-11-24. 
  2. ^ Saner E (2007-08-07). "'It is not a disease, it is a way of life'". The Guardian (London). Archived from the original on 20 August 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-07. 
  3. ^ Shapiro, Joseph (June 26, 2006). "Autism Movement Seeks Acceptance, Not Cures". NPR. Retrieved 2007-11-23. 
  4. ^ Baron-Cohen S (2000). "Is Asperger syndrome/high-functioning autism necessarily a disability?". Dev Psychopathol 12 (3): 489–500. doi:10.1017/S0954579400003126. PMID 11014749. 
  5. ^ Trivedi, Bijal (18 June 2005). "Autistic and proud of it". New Scientist. Retrieved 2007-11-24. 

External links[edit]