Avtek 400A

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400A
AVTEK 400.jpg
Role Business aircraft
Manufacturer Avtek
Designer Al Mooney
First flight 17 September 1984
Number built 1

The Avtek 400A was a prototype turboprop-powered business aircraft developed in the United States in the early 1980s. It was of unusual and distinctive configuration - a low-wing monoplane with two pusher engines mounted above the wings, and a large canard mounted atop the forward fuselage. The aircraft's sleek, futuristic design earned it a guest appearance on the Airwolf TV series as the X-400, the plane used by the villain Lou Stappleford in the episode Eagles.

The Avtek's structure made extensive use of advanced composite materials throughout.

In 1998, Avtek declared bankruptcy without the prototype having completed the testing required for US FAA type certification. The company's assets were purchased by AvtekAir, who as of 2004 were planning to revive the project under the designation AvtekAir 9000T.

Specifications (Avtek 400A pre-production prototype)[edit]

Data from Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1988-89[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 5-9 passengers
  • Length: 39 ft 4 in (11.99 m)
  • Wingspan: 35 ft 0 in (10.67 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 5 in (3.47 m)
  • Wing area: 144 sq ft (13.4 m2) inc. foreplane
  • Airfoil: Avtek 12
  • Empty weight: 3,779 lb (1,714 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 6,499 lb (2,948 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-3L turboprop, 680 hp (507 kW) LH rotation
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-3R RH rotation
  • Propellers: 4-bladed Hartzell constant-speed fully feathering pusher propellers, 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) diameter

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 255 kn (293 mph; 472 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 297 kn (342 mph; 550 km/h) at 10,000 ft (3,000 m)
364 knots (674 km/h; 419 mph) at 22,000 ft (6,700 m)
338 knots (626 km/h; 389 mph) at 41,000 ft (12,000 m)
  • Stall speed: 83 kn (96 mph; 154 km/h)
  • Range: 1,038 nmi; 1,194 mi (1,922 km) with NBAA/IFR reserves
  • Service ceiling: 42,490 ft (12,950 m)
  • Rate of climb: 4,630 ft/min (23.52 m/s)

References[edit]

  1. ^ John W.R. Taylor, ed. (1988). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1988-89. London: Jane's Information Group. ISBN 0-7106-0867-5. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 916. 

External links[edit]