Axel Rauschenbach

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Axel Rauschenbach
Bundesarchiv Bild 183-1988-1106-005, Mandy Wötzel, Axel Rauschnbach.jpg
Wötzel and Rauschenbach in 1988
Personal information
Country represented Germany
East Germany
Born (1967-07-14) 14 July 1967 (age 47)
Dresden, East Germany
Former partner Anuschka Gläser
Mandy Wötzel
Former coach Monika Scheibe
Skating club Eislaufverein Chemnitz

Axel Rauschenbach (born 14 July 1967) is a German pair skater who competed for Germany and, before its reunification, East Germany. With Mandy Wötzel, he is the 1989 European silver medalist, the 1989 & 1990 East German national champion, and 1991 German national champion.

Personal life[edit]

Rauschenbach was born 14 July 1967 in Dresden, East Germany. He married Anett Pötzsch and is the stepfather of Claudia Rauschenbach.

Career[edit]

Rauschenbach began competing with Mandy Wötzel by 1987. They trained in Chemnitz and represented East Germany early in their career.

Wötzel/Rauschenbach won the silver medal at the 1989 European Championships but missed the 1989 World Championships. That year, Rauschenbach's skate blade struck Wötzel's head while they were performing side-by-side camel spins.[1] After she recovered, they continued competing. They represented Germany at the 1992 Winter Olympics, where they placed 8th. In 1992, he ended their partnership to work at a bank.[2]

A year later, Rauschenbach teamed up with Anuschka Gläser. They won the 1994 German national title and represented Germany at the 1994 Winter Olympics, where they placed 13th.

Results[edit]

With Anuschka Gläser[edit]

International
Event 1993–94
Winter Olympics 13th
World Championships 14th
European Championships 10th
Skate America 7th
Nations Cup 5th
National
German Championships 1st

With Mandy Wötzel[edit]

International
Event 1987–88 1988–89 1989–90 1990–91 1991–92
Winter Olympics 8th
World Championships 8th 7th
European Championships 5th 2nd 5th
Skate America 3rd
Trophée de France 2nd 1st
National
German Championships 1st 2nd
East German Champ. 2nd 1st 1st

References[edit]